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Terms and translations in German drafts.

translation german draftterms

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#1 HautenDandy

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Posted 06 August 2016 - 05:03 AM

I hope this to be an ongoing topic, not only for my self but for anyone who has access to delightful German drafts without the knowledge of German.


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#2 HautenDandy

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Posted 06 August 2016 - 05:10 AM

So first off I have a draft that says  1/10 h.Gw + 3

 

Can I take the h. to mean Halfte?



#3 posaune

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Posted 06 August 2016 - 07:04 AM

yes Haelfte
1/10 of the half hip + 3 cm
lg
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#4 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 06 August 2016 - 03:22 PM

Ok - give me a bit of time to get things together.  Don't forget to look at the stuff peterle and I have already put together.  Plus I will gather together some help I received from Schneidergott about the very old sewing terms.

 

G


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#5 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 07 August 2016 - 01:32 AM

Just found this, from peterle and pfaff260 from 2013:

 

"When you decide to draft nett:  In Inlays and turnings http://www.cutterand...p?showtopic=399 is a sketch of Rundschau Trousers. The full lines are the drafted pattern lines, the dotted lines are the sewing lines. Fertige Naht/Nähte means finished seams, witch means you have to sew directly on the line. So there is no seam allowance at the darts and the center back seam!

Grey areas  are inlays for fitting (Einschlag) and turnings (Saum).They are not included in the pattern and are added when cutting the fabric.

Knowing this, it´s possible to draft the pattern nett, but it´s very easy to make mistakes (been there, done that). Easier and faster and more reliable is pfaff260´s method."


Edited by Schneiderfrei, 07 August 2016 - 01:33 AM.

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#6 Henry Hall

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Posted 07 August 2016 - 08:04 AM

Just for clarity's sake, 'saum' is literally 'seam' and refers to the finished edge or 'hem' created by the turned allowance on the waistcoat in that thread.


Edited by Henry Hall, 07 August 2016 - 08:05 AM.

Each phenomenon which is taken up should be treated with as much thoroughness as possible at that standpoint... One thing at a time and that done well!

 

- Otto Jespersen (How to Teach a Foreign Language).


#7 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 07 August 2016 - 08:26 PM

Thanks Henry I have usually read Hem for Saum.


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#8 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 07 August 2016 - 08:55 PM

German Drafting Terms related to upper body garments - such as a Weste (waistcoat):

 

 

 

Kh Körperhöhe                            Body Height

Kg Körpergrosse                         (Old term)

 

Bu Brustumfang                          Chest Circumference

Ow Oberweite                              (Old term)   

 

Tu    Taillenumfang                      Waist Circumference

Uw Unterweite                             (Old term)              

 

 

Rh            Rückenhöhe                           Back height 

Tl             Tailenlaenge                           Waist length

RL            Rückenlänge                          Back length

Hs            Hals spiegel                            Neck half width

At             Armlochtiefe                           Armhole depth

Rb            Rückenbreite                          Back width
Ad            Armlochdurchmesser            
Armhole diameter?

Bb            Brustbreite                             Chest width

Ba            Bauchbreite                            Belly width

 

Av   Armvortrittslinie = front limit of the armhole  I thought there was a term for the hinter (back) but I can't find it.

 

Gesamtmaß: = Finished Width


Edited by Schneiderfrei, 08 August 2016 - 11:17 PM.

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#9 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 07 August 2016 - 10:06 PM

I would like to ask the full German term for Ba?


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#10 peterle

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Posted 07 August 2016 - 10:36 PM

Just for clarity's sake, 'saum' is literally 'seam' and refers to the finished edge or 'hem' created by the turned allowance on the waistcoat in that thread.

 

Sorry but no. Saum does not mean seam. Saum just means hem and the turned in material on the lower edge of a garment. Nothing else.

 

Naht means seam, Naht-Zugabe means seam-allowance.

 

 

I would like to ask the full German term for Ba?

 

The full term is Bauchbreite.



#11 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 08 August 2016 - 12:11 AM

I knew that . . . .a while ago. :)


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#12 Henry Hall

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Posted 08 August 2016 - 12:18 AM

 

Sorry but no. Saum does not mean seam. Saum just means hem and the turned in material on the lower edge of a garment. Nothing else.

 

Naht means seam, Naht-Zugabe means seam-allowance.

 

Sorry, but yes. Saum does mean seam, even though naht is more commonly used. In both Dutch and German there is a fuzziness between naad/zoom and naht/saum that doesn't exist in English.


Edited by Henry Hall, 08 August 2016 - 12:19 AM.

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Each phenomenon which is taken up should be treated with as much thoroughness as possible at that standpoint... One thing at a time and that done well!

 

- Otto Jespersen (How to Teach a Foreign Language).


#13 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 08 August 2016 - 12:31 AM

Now HD, the harder terms arrive, those terms that describe how to manipulate the measurements.  Here are some that are not very obvious (to me).  Many more are those that suggest measure/draw/mark.

 

Auschnitt - neckline

 

Einschlag – Seam allowance

 

Einstellung = measurement inwards also Einstellen, abstellen, abtragen

 

Kneifen, kneifbetrag = pinch (v), pinch amount

 

Sperrung = separation amount

 

winkeln, abwinkeln = Square

 

Zugabe = additional amount (whether it be for seam or inlay or ease).

 

 

This was from Schneidergott, and refers to some quite old instruction terms:

 

"Abgesperrt" means "blocked" in older texts. In this particular case the waistband doesn't allow the cloth/ back trouser to go up, so everything is pushed downwards. [this is where you cut open the paper pattern to enlarge the piece]

 

"Gesperrt" or "sperren" of a pattern means "to open (-ed up)".

 

"Kneifen" for that matter means the opposite, you close/ overlap a part of a pattern. [to make the piece smaller]

 

 

This also from Schneidergott:

 

In old texts the waist/ Taillenumfang is called Unterweite.

 

Leibweite is something you'll find in really old texts.


Edited by Schneiderfrei, 10 August 2016 - 01:27 AM.

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#14 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 08 August 2016 - 12:45 AM

Hello peterle,

 

Could you help once again with:

 

Mehrweiterkontrolle?


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#15 posaune

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Posted 08 August 2016 - 01:27 AM

Mehrweitenkontrolle = you controll how much ease you have added.
example: Goal is 5.5 cm ease per half pattern for a coat.
You add up the different measures from Armhole Bustwidth, backwidth of your pattern and subtract 1/2 of bustcirc.
Result is the Mehrweite.
There is Umbug - this is a hem too only once folded over.
lg
posaune
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#16 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 08 August 2016 - 02:01 AM

I thought 'weiten' was my misspelling, Viel Danke posaune


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#17 peterle

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Posted 08 August 2016 - 05:09 AM

 

Sorry, but yes. Saum does mean seam, even though naht is more commonly used. In both Dutch and German there is a fuzziness between naad/zoom and naht/saum that doesn't exist in English.

 

I can´t say it for Dutch, but in German Saum only means hem. Just looked it up in three different dictionaries for current German (Duden, Brockhaus and Meyers Konversationslexikon) and Wikipedia. It only means "the turned fabric at the lower edge of a garment to prevent fraying". Saum and Naht are completely distinguished in German.


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#18 Henry Hall

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Posted 08 August 2016 - 06:30 AM

Well, my Langenscheidt says otherwise. I'm not going to pursue it though.


Each phenomenon which is taken up should be treated with as much thoroughness as possible at that standpoint... One thing at a time and that done well!

 

- Otto Jespersen (How to Teach a Foreign Language).






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