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Trouser Making - Sequence?


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#1 lngn2

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Posted 22 September 2017 - 11:07 PM

I got access to an overlocker yesterday and used it to serge the seam allowances on some trews I'm making - what a difference to using the single needle 'overlock' stitch on my sewing machine (and indeed to doing it by hand). Anyway it got me thinking - what's the correct point to do this?! As I see it options are:

 

-Immediately after cutting out (at that point hopefully no need to use the cutter on the serger so seam allowances stay true to the pattern).

-After initial ironwork but before making up (the overlocking would prevent stretching otherwise). Risk that seam allowances get trimmed.

-One the garment has been basted up or sewn?

 

Any thoughts or guidance would be much appreciated. I will post a thread on the trews once they're done..!



#2 greger

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Posted 23 September 2017 - 02:55 AM

All of the above sometimes.

If you will be getting rid of some inlays, then later. 



#3 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 23 September 2017 - 06:02 AM

Immediately after cutting out and basting the lining underneath. Make nice seams with your scissors and have a correct pattern.


Edited by Der Zuschneider, 23 September 2017 - 06:03 AM.

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#4 Schneidergott

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Posted 23 September 2017 - 06:28 AM

What DZ said.

Leave the lining a bit bigger so you can work in a little length (lining tends to shrink a bit even after it has been pressed off before it gets cut). You can easily cut away the excess lining with the overlocker without making the cloth inlay smaller.

I also baste through the front crease line to hold the lining in place first. I found it prevents the lining from creasing inside when you press in the front crease.


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#5 lngn2

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Posted 23 September 2017 - 07:25 AM

Thank you both - that's really helpful. The more I think about tailoring the more I realise there is to learn (and how much really isn't written anywhere!)

#6 Terri

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Posted 23 September 2017 - 10:58 PM

I lay out the cut out fashion fabric on the lining and then cut .5mm away from the wool.
When the lining is installed, the crease is basted, then the lining cut edge is matched to the cloth edge. Ease lengthwise in lining is also put in then the seams are serged.
I have found it necessary to not just steam press the lining, but spritz/mist it with water and press it dry to preshrink it. Of course our garments are worn more often, sweated in a lot and cleaned more often than personal items would be.
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#7 jeffrey2117

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Posted 23 September 2017 - 11:38 PM

Hello,

 

    I would suggest using a longer piece of scrap material to check the adjustments on your overlock machine prior to sewing the garment.  I found that sometimes I have to make adjustments depending on the cloth.

 

Regards,

 

Jeffrey2117


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#8 lngn2

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Posted 24 September 2017 - 06:37 AM

Terri, Jeffrey - thank you. These actually aren't lined as they're fairly heavy but something for me to consider on ordinary trousers! Jeffrey - yes indeed - it was the first time I have had access to one and the results on calico vs wool were quite different!
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#9 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 24 September 2017 - 01:25 PM

A good thing is to iron the fabric before you lay the pattern on the fabric. It takes some shrinking in the length. This is important before you cut for coats and vests. Trousers you give more inlay on the bottom anyway.


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#10 greger

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Posted 24 September 2017 - 03:06 PM

When it comes to linings I cut with pinks. If it fraze easily a larger seam allowance. If it is really bad then over cast, blanket stitch, serging, zigzag. Of course it helps to pick good linings so as to not waste time. 


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#11 Schneidergott

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Posted 26 September 2017 - 06:54 AM

When it comes to linings I cut with pinks. If it fraze easily a larger seam allowance. If it is really bad then over cast, blanket stitch, serging, zigzag. Of course it helps to pick good linings so as to not waste time. 

 

When lining the fronts of trousers you put them so that the knee is on the selvedge of the lining, so you don't have to pink the edges. This way you can use the entire width of the lining and it's less wasteful.


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"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
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http://www.dressedwell.net/ It's snarky, but fun.


#12 Terri

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Posted 26 September 2017 - 10:13 PM

Somehow this seems odd and wrong. I have seen people do it, but there's something about not having consistent grains that goes against the grain to me ;)

Edited by Terri, 26 September 2017 - 10:13 PM.

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#13 tombennett

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Posted 26 September 2017 - 10:48 PM

If we are talking about SG's last comment I have been doing my linings the same, and, as a wearer of my trousers I haven't noticed any issue, whether comfort, strength or drape with having straight grain for the trouser legs and cross-grain for the linings.


Edited by tombennett, 27 September 2017 - 09:21 PM.

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#14 SPOOKIETOO

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Posted 27 September 2017 - 09:37 PM

Terri - that was my first thought the first time I ran across this practice. But then I thought it thru. Trousers will invariably bag at the knee if one sits often, even though they are cut on grain. I can't help but think the additional cross-wise grain would help with this issue.
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#15 posaune

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Posted 27 September 2017 - 09:58 PM

I do this all the time - no problems. I LIKE sometimes going against the grain - especially beside sewing! hehehe
lg posaune
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#16 Terri

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Posted 27 September 2017 - 10:48 PM

Its good to know that there are so many of you going against the grain!
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#17 Terri

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Posted 27 September 2017 - 10:51 PM

I may try cutting the trouser lining on the cross grain next season. It would be interesting to see if it makes any difference after 7 months of wearing and cleaning, compared to what we usually do.

If shrinkage is generally greater on the lengthwise grain, it may work in my favour.
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#18 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 28 September 2017 - 10:23 AM

I may try cutting the trouser lining on the cross grain next season. It would be interesting to see if it makes any difference after 7 months of wearing and cleaning, compared to what we usually do.

If shrinkage is generally greater on the lengthwise grain, it may work in my favour.

 

Don't try it. The selvedge has to be on the knee. Knees will not bag. Lining is used rational that way.


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