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Tailoring Apprentice Starts a Pair of Trousers

Anderson & Sheppard Trousers

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#1 tailleuse

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Posted 20 January 2016 - 04:22 AM

From The Notebook.

 

Anderson-Sheppard-Matthew-trousers-3-683


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#2 tailleuse

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Posted 21 January 2016 - 03:33 AM

I usually start with a folded rectangle of cloth. I chalk around the pattern and cut.  Has he cut the wool this way:

 

--To save fabric?

--To add inlays?

--To chalk in the seam allowances?

--None of the above?


Edited by tailleuse, 21 January 2016 - 03:33 AM.

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#3 Henry Hall

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Posted 21 January 2016 - 07:56 AM

Don't you start with rectangle of cloth for trousers?


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#4 tailleuse

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Posted 21 January 2016 - 08:06 AM

Don't you start with rectangle of cloth for trousers?

 

Yes. I pin the cloth, lay down the pattern, measure from the selvedge or the fold to the pattern's grain line at a few points and then chalk around the pattern (my patterns usually include the seam allowances).  Then I remove the pattern and cut on the chalked lines.  If I need to tailor tack anything such as pocket lines I re-chalk any lines if necessary, sew the loops, separate the plies and cut the thread.

 

The young man in the photo appears to have cut out the shape and now is chalking, which is why I asked if he had included inlays or was marking the seam allowances.


Edited by tailleuse, 21 January 2016 - 08:12 AM.

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#5 tombennett

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Posted 21 January 2016 - 08:13 AM

Don't you start with rectangle of cloth for trousers?

 

 

Henry, didn't you know you can now buy trouser blanks. 


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#6 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 21 January 2016 - 08:30 AM

I'd like to order some, in my shape!


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#7 tailleuse

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Posted 21 January 2016 - 10:56 AM

 

 

Henry, didn't you know you can now buy trouser blanks. 

 

 

I'd like to order some, in my shape!

 

 

Do you understand my question? I think that he may already have cut the legs out and is now using the pattern again to take the shape for the seam allowances. But some of them look very narrow.


Edited by tailleuse, 21 January 2016 - 10:57 AM.

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#8 Terri

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Posted 21 January 2016 - 09:45 PM

It seems odd.
I can't see the advantage of rough cutting a shape unless he actually has ordered a blank, or are you pulling my leg? My trouser leg.....

that photo has such an awkward feel to me.
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#9 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 21 January 2016 - 09:52 PM

Why wouldn't he chalk the pattern outline first, then cut the seam allowance?

 

But what particularly bothers me is how often does the right side perfectly match the left in reality.  I know from painful experience that mine certainly do not.

 

 So my point is.  How much fitting went into the production of the pattern? Because it does look like there are two cloth pieces under the paper.


Edited by Schneiderfrei, 21 January 2016 - 09:57 PM.

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#10 tombennett

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Posted 22 January 2016 - 12:07 AM

 

 

 

 

Do you understand my question? I think that he may already have cut the legs out and is now using the pattern again to take the shape for the seam allowances. But some of them look very narrow.

 

 

Yes, I did. I was just being a little silly, sorry. :Big Grin:  It looks to me that he is marking the CB inlay as well as the seam allowances all round, which, as everyone points out is a little strange.  Beyond that I haven't a clue as to his workflow or, thoughts.


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#11 tailleuse

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Posted 22 January 2016 - 12:48 AM

 

 

Yes, I did. I was just being a little silly, sorry. :Big Grin:  It looks to me that he is marking the CB inlay as well as the seam allowances all round, which, as everyone points out is a little strange.  Beyond that I haven't a clue as to his workflow or, thoughts.

 

I enjoyed the silliness.  :)  I thought in my earlier post that it was clear that I cut from a folded rectangle and I just wanted to see if anyone else could guess at what he was doing.

 

I assume it's a perfectly acceptable method. It seems inconceivable that he could have helped with several trousers and been given the go-ahead to make his own with nice cloth if he was on the wrong track.

 

Is it possible he's chalking all the seam allowances in order to be very precise, the way one would with a muslin? One difference between him and me is that I've always worked with a tested pattern created to fit a man's dress form. There was no fitting, hence no need for inlays.


Edited by tailleuse, 22 January 2016 - 01:04 AM.

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#12 tailleuse

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Posted 22 January 2016 - 12:55 AM

It seems odd.
I can't see the advantage of rough cutting a shape unless he actually has ordered a blank, or are you pulling my leg? My trouser leg.....

that photo has such an awkward feel to me.

 

I like to put up posts from The Notebook because it's the only blog I know that features apprentices from a respected Savile Row establishment. It's interesting to see how other people work, although I wish I understood what he was doing.  It's too bad the blog doesn't have a comments section, but I understand why they wouldn't want to get caught up in that.

 

I appreciate that they show apprentices at work.  Can you imagine being a junior employee in training and having your work discussed on the web?  


Edited by tailleuse, 22 January 2016 - 01:09 AM.

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#13 Henry Hall

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Posted 22 January 2016 - 02:36 AM

 

 

Henry, didn't you know you can now buy trouser blanks. 

 

Is this true, or are you having me on?


"Luxury must be comfortable, otherwise it is not luxury." - Coco Chanel.


#14 Henry Hall

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Posted 22 January 2016 - 02:41 AM

 

 

 

 

Do you understand my question? I think that he may already have cut the legs out and is now using the pattern again to take the shape for the seam allowances. But some of them look very narrow.

 

I do now. I suspect this is an afterthought photo because he'd already reached the cutting out stage before one was taken for the blog. Who knows what magic goes on at Anderson & Sheppard :unknw:


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#15 greger

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Posted 22 January 2016 - 03:15 AM

Confusing the general public, so they make errors if they copy "his" method. That, or he made an error. Maybe this is how he adds dress.
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#16 tombennett

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Posted 22 January 2016 - 03:52 AM

I did wonder whether he was adding dress but on analysis it doesn't look like he is, he's going all around; he's marking the pocket on the foreparts in the frame, but also adding s.a.  ummm  :Thinking:


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#17 tailleuse

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Posted 24 January 2016 - 01:55 AM

Confusing the general public, so they make errors if they copy "his" method. 

 

Don't try this at home, folks.  Literally.  :LMAO:


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