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corrections for bow legs-striped fabric


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#1 Terri

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Posted 03 April 2010 - 04:46 AM

I am curious about your opinion on what works best for you when correcting your draft/pattern for bow legs.

How do you deal with this correction and pressing the crease in a striped fabric? The trousers I am making are narrow(16 1/2") hem with cuffs, 1920's style, flat fronted with a crease. The fabric is striped as I mentioned.

Is it more practical to manipulate the fabric with iron work or pattern adjustments or both?

#2 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 03 April 2010 - 05:26 AM

Bow legs with stripe fabric can be tricky, depends of the distance between the knees as well.
You should find this information in cutting books. I am sure Sator is scanning some information.
Don't start cutting, wait for the information.
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#3 jukes

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Posted 03 April 2010 - 07:41 AM

See "Adaption of trouser Blocks" at the top of this thread. After taking out the wedge at the knee you will have to blend in the runs on the inside and outside leg seams to disguise the alteration. It will be tricky to keep the stripe run straight

#4 Terri

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Posted 03 April 2010 - 09:01 AM

After taking out the wedge at the knee you will have to blend in the runs on the inside and outside leg seams to disguise the alteration.


Yes, I have done this before (in plain fabrics) and it is a successful manipulation- but there is an obvious limit to how much you can take out without making another problem.
If I do that alteration with the stripe, it throws the leg off the stripe or straight grain from the knee down. Should the crease remain centred (halfway between inseam and outseam) even though the leg is displaced- which would mean the crease does not follow the stripe? or would it be better to follow the stripe in the wool and the crease will be off centre-closer to the outseam?

Luckily the bow in the legs is not large, but it is noticeable, and the fabric isn't a bold stripe, but still, I'd like to make them look as best as I can on the body.
Oh and no, I don't have any say in the fabric choice. :)

#5 jukes

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Posted 03 April 2010 - 04:43 PM

If the bow leg is not too large, you could stretch the outside leg seam and shrink the inside leg seam with the iron to form the bow leg, then when pressing the crease the stripes should appear to run straight, however this will not hold when they are dry cleaned. So the best bet maybe a combination of the wedge at the knee in the pattern and a bit of iron work.

Another method would be to drop the waist line, fork line, Knee line and hem line at the fork and inside leg seam a 1/4" on the fore parts only, when joined to the under sides it will form the bow and your stripes will still be straight. This will work if bow is not too severe.

Edited by jukes, 03 April 2010 - 07:04 PM.


#6 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 04 April 2010 - 12:39 AM

If the distance between the knees is more than 6 cm then better don't use stripe fabric.
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#7 jcsprowls

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Posted 04 April 2010 - 01:12 AM

^ I second what DZ just said.

Some fabrics are not suitable for the body they're going onto or the style that best flatters that body.

I also do not ascribe to the belief that "all men should" <insert_whatever (e.g. wear white shirts, gray suit, etc)>. IOW: get at the root of why this person thinks he wants a striped suit.

If it's a work uniform (I consider a costume to be a uniform) then the stripe doesn't need to conform to his leg shape. A movie or some other highly photographed/filmed/publicized role... maybe.

Effectively, what I'm getting at is that you don't have to solve everyone's problem. It's easier to redirect an un-informed patron than it is to live up to their expectations. Then, again, if you get something out of it (e.g. the chance to develop invaluable expertise) it might be worth a few concessions.

Edited by jcsprowls, 04 April 2010 - 01:19 AM.

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#8 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 04 April 2010 - 02:16 AM

Or, there's option C. Break his legs and reset them straight. :diablo: :Whistle:
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#9 Terri

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Posted 04 April 2010 - 02:26 AM

If the bow leg is not too large, you could stretch the outside leg seam and shrink the inside leg seam with the iron to form the bow leg, then when pressing the crease the stripes should appear to run straight, however this will not hold when they are dry cleaned. So the best bet maybe a combination of the wedge at the knee in the pattern and a bit of iron work.

Another method would be to drop the waist line, fork line, Knee line and hem line at the fork and inside leg seam a 1/4" on the fore parts only, when joined to the under sides it will form the bow and your stripes will still be straight. This will work if bow is not too severe.



Thanks, this gives me something to think about.

(I consider a costume to be a uniform) then the stripe doesn't need to conform to his leg shape.


Well- it is my work on display so I am aiming for the best I can make things-we have a very high standard here.

Then, again, if you get something out of it (e.g. the chance to develop invaluable expertise)

Exactly.

Designers are choosing fabrics for character as much as anything, and they often haven't a clue whether the actor has figure issues(and if I haven't taken the measurements, or seen the person before, neither do I). It is my job to make things work (within reason)- whether the fabric is lightweight or heavy or the actor is symmetrical or not- all part of the job-
Thanks again.

#10 jcsprowls

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Posted 04 April 2010 - 11:51 AM

If this is for stage, then other actors will need to wear the costume at some point in the future - whether for a revival of this show or as the basis of some future show.

If it were me, I would not strive for a custom fit. I would make a stock style; and, make it easy to alter.

I get the notion of professional excellence. But, only you can determine what is a balance you can live with.
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#11 Terri

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Posted 05 April 2010 - 12:04 AM

I get the notion of professional excellence. But, only you can determine what is a balance you can live with.


Well yes- believe me, I can and do let things go when it makes no sense to continue- there are limits.

If the distance between the knees is more than 6 cm then better don't use stripe fabric.

We'd be changing the fabric in that case.

But the question was serious- I wanted to know if there were suggestions other than not bothering to deal with it- The future use is less important to me than the immediate one. :)

#12 JMB

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Posted 06 April 2010 - 02:23 AM

Or, there's option C. Break his legs and reset them straight. :diablo: :Whistle:


J. Mac:

Even if you were to break his legs and reset them, they would neither be straight nor of even length. Chances are the femurs might shatter spontaneously below the hip sockets at some later date and make him a paraplegic. Very hard for a tailor to get the measure of a man in a wheelchair. This is a human being, not a thoroughbred; but, then, they shoot horses, don't they?

JMB




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