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(Neo) Edwardian pictures.


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#19 greger

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Posted 23 April 2010 - 04:49 PM

I think we are at a phase where we are back to something like the 1960s, which was itself a kind of return of the fashion cycle to that of the Edwardian era. Both the Edwardian era and the 1960s were peaks in stylishness as far the 20th century went. Clean fits and narrower lapels were the order of the day in both periods. Let's hope this decade can make the most of it.



Hope this is true and sticks around for a while.

People who say that mid width lapels are correct- bah humbug. All lapels are good. The ones I like the most are the widest.

#20 Frog in Suit

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Posted 23 April 2010 - 05:58 PM

Never saw a Bowler in the sixties.

I kinda don't think they were around in the fifties, either.

Maybe they were for special occaions back then.

Fedoras I never liked. Bowlers are nice.


I should have made it clear that I was referring to the U.K., more precisely to London.
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#21 NJS

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Posted 24 April 2010 - 10:38 PM

I agree with Frog in Suit. Indeed, so far as London is concerned, bowler/coke and homburg hats were very much still in evidence in the 1960s and later. In fact many believe that it was one of the banking disasters of the 1980s that put paid to them. Some people such as Lord Justice Harman of the Court of Appeal daily still wore a topper into the 1960s and stockjobbers wore toppers until 1986. In coutry towns, men normally wore tweed hats or caps. Hats are seldom worn now but a hard hat on its own does not make the New Edwardian style. Indeed the New Edwardian bowlers/cokes were higher in the crown than those usual by the 1950s-1960s. However, there are some great images here; although it is not a style that I should adopt for myself.
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#22 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 25 April 2010 - 08:07 AM

I think we are at a phase where we are back to something like the 1960s, which was itself a kind of return of the fashion cycle to that of the Edwardian era. Both the Edwardian era and the 1960s were peaks in stylishness as far the 20th century went. Clean fits and narrower lapels were the order of the day in both periods. Let's hope this decade can make the most of it.


This is what I exactly think as well. A great time to tailor now. Neo-Edwardian and the 60thies, but also the 20thies style I like.
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#23 NJS

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Posted 25 April 2010 - 01:05 PM

Well, I do not entirely agree. I think that the period between about 1925 to 1935 epitomised the enduring classic style for lounge suits. The general Edwardian patterns are still used but the lounge suit styles (as explified in pictures) were a little undecided - because they were for informal wear. The 1960s' lounge suit styles were skimped. The best tailors now, to my mind, hark back to the search for proportion in length and breadth of the inter-war era: just seeking a compliment for the form beneath; bearing in mind that the lounge suit had, by then, become the general purpose clothing of everyday.

Edited by NJS, 25 April 2010 - 01:07 PM.

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#24 Sator

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Posted 25 April 2010 - 08:22 PM

Personally, I find there is no such thing as the "best" decade in the 20th century. There are things to be liked about each and every decade. For me, I would rather wear a Connery era Bond Conduit cut than a 1930s cut simply because it looks less dated and more contemporary:

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#25 NJS

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Posted 25 April 2010 - 10:09 PM

That's a 'still' from From Russia With Love, isn't it? Great suits in that film, I agree. But to illustrate my point, here is a 'still' of Clive Brook (with Mary Carlisle) in Love In Exile from 1936. Not everyone went for the sack-look. Indeed, Brook was one of the elegantest of all the stars of the Holywood's Golden Age. Unfortunately, he is not as well-remembered as some of the rest because he returned to England with his family in around 1940. However, the suit that he is wearing here would today raise eyebrows - but eyebrows raised in admiration. To my mind the 1960s' suits have dated somewhat - button-spacing; lapel width, pocket flap size - (pace Sator) but a suit such as that worn by Brook here, will never date. :Shame On You:

Posted Image

I agree that there is not really any especial decade just examples of good and bad from every period. Our task is to select the best from each.

Edited by NJS, 25 April 2010 - 10:22 PM.

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#26 Sator

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Posted 25 April 2010 - 11:50 PM

I actually quite enjoy the dramatic wide lapels of the 1930s. Then I find the baggy trousers of the era (the age of Oxford bags) aren't to my taste. I personally find the mixture of baggy double pleated trousers and a body-fitting coat here to be strange. If you look at the whole history of the dress suit for a hundred years or more before 1935 (I think the coat is from 1935), both coat and trousers were equally fitted (just take a look at a picture of Beau Brummell). Suddenly, in the 1930s fashion dictated that trousers be baggier, and even dress trousers were cut that way. There are things I admire about that Pope & Bradley coat but the suit overall is hardly free of period fashion extremes. The 1930s are not a fashion neutral era, but rather the best things about the fashions of this time are to be enjoyed in their own right. You have to be a very starry eyed 1930s fanatic to believe that this era represents Permanent Style and that all other eras represent mere fleeting fashion.

#27 NJS

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Posted 26 April 2010 - 12:45 AM

I actually quite enjoy the dramatic wide lapels of the 1930s. Then I find the baggy trousers of the era (the age of Oxford bags) aren't to my taste. I personally find the mixture of baggy double pleated trousers and a body-fitting coat here to be strange. If you look at the whole history of the dress suit for a hundred years or more before 1935 (I think the coat is from 1935), both coat and trousers were equally fitted (just take a look at a picture of Beau Brummell). Suddenly, in the 1930s fashion dictated that trousers be baggier, and even dress trousers were cut that way. There are things I admire about that Pope & Bradley coat but the suit overall is hardly free of period fashion extremes. The 1930s are not a fashion neutral era, but rather the best things about the fashions of this time are to be enjoyed in their own right. You have to be a very starry eyed 1930s fanatic to believe that this era represents Permanent Style and that all other eras represent mere fleeting fashion.


I don't really like any of the fashion quirks of the thirties; baggy trousers, exaggerated lapels etc., but I think that, possibly more than at any time before or since, there were plentiful images created ('still' and moving) of public figures (for example, film stars, such as Brook) who knew how to dress and there were plenty of skilled people around to dress them. Neither of these things is any longer true and, probably never will be again because the world has gone mad for templates of low-life and it's easy: you don't even need to try to look like a slob: just be unkempt and the 'designers' will do the rest.

I dislike the phrase Permanent Style (not because of its originator but because of an ignorant and opinionated blogger who has latched onto it) but I know what it denotes and I think that it just means fitted bespoke tailoring (including any devices to hide physical defects)in a form that ignores the passing fads and fancies. I think that Brook's suit (indeed the whole outfit) could easily pass muster in the best company today.

Edited by NJS, 26 April 2010 - 12:54 AM.

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#28 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 26 April 2010 - 01:36 AM

That's a 'still' from From Russia With Love, isn't it? Great suits in that film, I agree. But to illustrate my point, here is a 'still' of Clive Brook (with Mary Carlisle) in Love In Exile from 1936. Not everyone went for the sack-look. Indeed, Brook was one of the elegantest of all the stars of the Holywood's Golden Age. Unfortunately, he is not as well-remembered as some of the rest because he returned to England with his family in around 1940. However, the suit that he is wearing here would today raise eyebrows - but eyebrows raised in admiration. To my mind the 1960s' suits have dated somewhat - button-spacing; lapel width, pocket flap size - (pace Sator) but a suit such as that worn by Brook here, will never date. :Shame On You:

Posted Image

I agree that there is not really any especial decade just examples of good and bad from every period. Our task is to select the best from each.


Even if you can't see much I love the silhouette of the crisp white suit, maybe someone has another picture of the man.
www.berlinbespokesuits.com

#29 NJS

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Posted 26 April 2010 - 01:48 AM

Here is a link to several pictures of Brook:
http://www.gettyimag...ssetType=image#
Just click on them to bring them up to a larger size (including the one I posted above). I have been in touch with his grandson over the possibility of a biography but, sadly, there seems little commercial interest from publishers. Nevertheless, I might do it anyway!

Edited by NJS, 26 April 2010 - 01:49 AM.

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#30 greger

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Posted 26 April 2010 - 05:46 AM

Hmm, I like this one.

Posted Image

Some of the pictures in that collection were to dark for looking at the clothes. Many of them need to be photoshoped. This guy went to an excellent tailor. Better than most.

#31 greger

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Posted 26 April 2010 - 06:06 AM

After the seventies I don't think there was much contribution to tailoring as there had been before. No doubt there are still some improvements, but not like there used to be.

Back in the 60s and 70s there were a lot of tailors that weren't that good. In fact, rather poor. Some are really good at illustrating their times through several decades, while others were hit and miss, and still, others, that I think were best to stay away from. It is no different today as to the skills that some have and others don't. Plus, taste are different from person to person, which means some love what I hate. With out a doubt the best tailors have the most knowledged and skill so they can best illustrate the theme of the day, and even contribute to it. And then there are those who can marry several decades together very well, while others who try that the marriage is on the rocks even before it began. Indeed, much of tailoring is art.

#32 NJS

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Posted 26 April 2010 - 07:15 AM

Hmm, I like this one.

Posted Image

Some of the pictures in that collection were to dark for looking at the clothes. Many of them need to be photoshoped. This guy went to an excellent tailor. Better than most.


For some reason, I am having difficulty bringing up the images posted here. Anyone else having this difficulty?
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#33 Artist's Eye

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Posted 26 April 2010 - 08:27 AM

The dinner jacket worn by Sean Connery in Dr No has neo Edwardian tones with the use of satin turned back cuffs.

The actor may have also worn it in the opening of 'From Russia with love' as well, but I can't be sure as the scene is quite dark.

Tom Ford revived the look for the last James Bond, but his cuffs and lapels lacked the verve of the Conduit version.
Tom's curves were too even in their arch, and being too even in their fullness, the lapels lacked a climax.

click on Conduit thumbnail to enlarge:

Attached Files


Edited by Artist's Eye, 26 April 2010 - 08:29 AM.

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#34 Artist's Eye

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Posted 26 April 2010 - 08:59 AM

Found a couple of images to illustrate the differences I mentioned with the first and last James Bond.

Attached File  Ford.jpg   12.4KB   32 downloads
Attached File  Sinclair.jpg   48.27KB   32 downloads

Once again, click on thumbnails to enlarge.

Edited by Artist's Eye, 26 April 2010 - 09:00 AM.

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#35 carpu65

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Posted 26 April 2010 - 12:48 PM

For me, I would rather wear a Connery era Bond Conduit cut than a 1930s cut simply because it looks less dated and more contemporary:


Not only less dated and contemporary,
but NATURAL, LIGHT,CLEAN and PLEASENT.

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#36 carpu65

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Posted 26 April 2010 - 01:12 PM

The dinner jacket worn by Sean Connery in Dr No has neo Edwardian tones


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