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Unusual Reefer Styles


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#1 Sator

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Posted 18 May 2009 - 06:22 PM

It has been said here a couple of times that these days block patterns get tweaked a few millimeters here and there between seasons. I must say that I love looking at old cutting manuals and fashion plates because you get the feeling that in the old days they painted with bolder strokes. You see a lot of imagination being excercised. We all know who it is that has poured cold water on this: the penny counting accountant who discovered that these interesting cuts cost too much to make up.

Here are some imaginative and generally quite tasteful variations on the reefer coat style (to use the traditional British cutter's term).

The first one is a curved edge on a button-two reefer. The two upper buttons are set further apart:





Here is a button-four, show five reefer. Notice that the top show buttons are not set apart in the modern fashion:



This next reefer has a button-two configuration but the bottom edge curves away:





The next style is also no longer seen today. It is a button-one reefer but with no less than three show buttons. Again, the top two buttons are not set apart in the modern manner:



Finally, here is a button-one reefer with only one show button. It last resurfaced in the 1980s, but it is sometimes shown in old fashion plates as another possible variation:



Here is another example of a reefer from 1906, this time with an obliquely angled front edge:



Another fascinating feature seen on old fashioned plates is the freedom seen on reefers with pockets.

Here are examples of a markedly slanted chest pocket:







Here is a reefer with vertical side pockets:



#2 PocketTriangle

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Posted 19 May 2009 - 12:13 AM

Interesting post! It seems like today, men's fashion is divided between soulless rehashes of old patterns and ridiculous ideas that no one would ever want (e.g. bright red dinner jackets). It's great to see some pictures from yesteryear when tailors explored subtle yet novel and interesting variations on time-tested themes.

#3 yachtie

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Posted 23 May 2009 - 06:37 AM



I could see this as working today. the others would be more problematic

I've worn jackets with the bottom button fastened only and there are wearability problems. the whole stance would have to be moved up to be able to have the jacket sit well when seated. Nice in theory as the lapel line is lengthened but there's a hard stop above the waist.

#4 I.Brackley

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Posted 23 May 2009 - 04:30 PM

Finally, here is a button-one reefer with only one show button. It last resurfaced in the 1980s, but it is sometimes shown in old fashion plates as another possible variation:

http://i201.photobuc...epo/Doppel1.jpg



I noticed this stance in an Ozwald Boateng collection from a few years back )
"The possibilities that exist in the portrayal of personality constitute the strongest, and in fact the only unanswerable argument for the supremacy of Custom Tailoring"

-F.T. Croonborg, c. 1917

#5 NJS

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Posted 23 May 2009 - 11:04 PM

I noticed this stance in an Ozwald Boateng collection from a few years back )


I have often thought that OB takes his inspiration from the New Edwardian style of Neil Munro 'Bunny' Roger - who probably also was a sartorial template for Avenger John Steed.
<b></b>NJS<b></b>

#6 greger

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Posted 02 June 2009 - 02:36 PM

In the past customers came to their tailors with ideas of their own or what they saw from a visitor or from their travels. And then tailors had some of their own ideas for certain customers. Today, few people go to tailors and we don't see much because of that. Some tailors only do the standards, but some like a challenge. In the old days some of the big tailor shops had one shop for the standard and another shop, so not to scare the average customer, for the wild and zaney.

Today what we mostly see is what designers do for one season and next season something else. When there were lots of tailors you would see many kinds of lapels, for example. 3-D has many shapes avaliable, but we only see a few. There were many kinds of reefers in the past. Nowadays, people are culivated like cows to buy something, being hearded and shuttled about from this corral to the next corral. Nobody thinks anymore. When I was a boy 50 years ago there was much to see. Today we see intirely different kinds of clothes, and I like seeing some of them, too.

#7 Sator

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Posted 02 June 2009 - 10:04 PM

It seems we have a lost a lot of species variation - in nature, something that is symptomatic of a ecosystem in crisis. Today's patterns seem to differ from the next only by millimeters. Block patterns are remarkable for their uniformity compared to those of the past.

#8 Sator

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Posted 15 December 2009 - 09:44 PM

Here is something interesting from Bernhard Weatherill of Bailley & Weatherill, a famous West End tailoring firm. This comes from the 15th May, 1963 edition of Allgemeine Schneiderzeitung.

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As it is such a fine coat, I think this is a good excuse to show this example from Louis Stanbury of Kilgour, French and Stanbury of Savile Row again:

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