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#19 Ttaaj

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 12:21 PM

Hello, you guys on the forum are so generous. I thank you for all your advice and information I been able to gather so far.

I am just starting out and would like to offer tailored suits and custom dresses for women. I don't have any clients at this point. I will be working out of my home to start with. What would be the best way, in your opinions to acquire clients? I personally like the quality approach. Should I be provide a swatch book for my clients? Would cold calling be the best method to get clients? How many samples would be sufficient to show for clients?

Thanks for any advice you can give me.

#20 lucianemil

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Posted 02 July 2011 - 05:46 AM

this post begs for a reboot.

so far i got this clear in my head.
a small business needs from the start to cater for a specific small niche.
provide a product with better fit than RTW, excell in design,
use good fabric to even better and finer,
and very fine trimmings.

the sewing machines need be industrial (because they are cheaper than Berninas anyway).
these machines need servicing for no downtime.
spare parts easy to get.

the person who starts a busyness like this,
must master the craft,
break it down in manageable chuncks,
than hire some help.
the entrepreneur is now the cutter,
the designer,
and the supervisor of the small staff.

this person must also sell the product.
shop around for supply
hire an accountant.
he needs to learn to delegate.
he needs to learn to comunicate. :wacko:
he needs to handle complaints from customers.

and all that for a small cottage business.
am i right to assume that the first skill to master must be
fast and stick to your guns decision making?

nothing new here, but please post questions to be answered.
this post needs a reboot!!

#21 Nishijin

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Posted 02 July 2011 - 07:17 AM

When you're on your own, working as craftman, you are 1/3 technical master, 1/3 salesman and 1/3 designer/artist, and another 1/3 business manager (finance, previsional planning...). Yes, that's 4 thirds, that's why you can't make 40hours weeks. When you start hiring, nothing changes in this, except your have to work more in every domain, and you also have to become a teacher and be a good team leader.

Being the boss of a small company is a hard job indeed.
http://www.paulgrassart.com

Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society.
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#22 saveira

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Posted 11 July 2011 - 09:50 PM

Hello, I also operate a small business sewing tailored suits and all types of dresses for women, recently I started teaching the topic of sewing for women. During my initial stages of starting up the business, I advertised in the newspaper, nothing big, just a small area. I made some call cards and everywhere I went, I gave these call cards to people. 90% of my clients came to me due to another client telling them about me. I was very fortunate to stumble upon this site, here is where I actually learned to cut a proper draft, since then I am so confident, nothing is impossible for me to cut, and I fit each client (at lease 90% of them) properly. I am often complimented.

Here are some advice for starting up your business:
(1) Draft some patterns before hand (Jackets, skirts, ladies pants etc) draft as many as you could ranging from bust 30 to bust 54, Hips 34 to Hips 54 etc.
(2) Get two new note books and make up a form. In one of the note book organise a form for it, this form should include date, name, due date, cost, downpayment and all the measurements you require from the customer, included a space for comments etc.
(3) In the note book, staple or glue stick the form on one side of the page and use the other side of the page to enter the description of the styles ( if you are making 5 suits, enter the colour and the description of each suit etc.
(4) The other note book is for fitting purposes, every adjustments you make for the customer relative to fitting, enter it in the note book with the customer name, this helps you to fit the customer better next time.
(5) Give call cards to all your customers (6) If you are buying the material, a swatch book is excellent and hanging up a few samples ( about 4 suits, each with a different type of collar ) in your shop is a good idea.
(7) If the customer is buying the material, you should get a few fashion magazines to show them so they can choose their styles.
(8) Organise a price list before hand so that customer can see it

I hope this help you a bit.



for

Hello, you guys on the forum are so generous. I thank you for all your advice and information I been able to gather so far.

I am just starting out and would like to offer tailored suits and custom dresses for women. I don't have any clients at this point. I will be working out of my home to start with. What would be the best way, in your opinions to acquire clients? I personally like the quality approach. Should I be provide a swatch book for my clients? Would cold calling be the best method to get clients? How many samples would be sufficient to show for clients?

Thanks for any advice you can give me.



#23 Ttaaj

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Posted 13 July 2011 - 02:11 PM

Thank you for your advice, I will continue to work forward with these bits in mind.



Hello, I also operate a small business sewing tailored suits and all types of dresses for women, recently I started teaching the topic of sewing for women. During my initial stages of starting up the business, I advertised in the newspaper, nothing big, just a small area. I made some call cards and everywhere I went, I gave these call cards to people. 90% of my clients came to me due to another client telling them about me. I was very fortunate to stumble upon this site, here is where I actually learned to cut a proper draft, since then I am so confident, nothing is impossible for me to cut, and I fit each client (at lease 90% of them) properly. I am often complimented.

Here are some advice for starting up your business:
(1) Draft some patterns before hand (Jackets, skirts, ladies pants etc) draft as many as you could ranging from bust 30 to bust 54, Hips 34 to Hips 54 etc.
(2) Get two new note books and make up a form. In one of the note book organise a form for it, this form should include date, name, due date, cost, downpayment and all the measurements you require from the customer, included a space for comments etc.
(3) In the note book, staple or glue stick the form on one side of the page and use the other side of the page to enter the description of the styles ( if you are making 5 suits, enter the colour and the description of each suit etc.
(4) The other note book is for fitting purposes, every adjustments you make for the customer relative to fitting, enter it in the note book with the customer name, this helps you to fit the customer better next time.
(5) Give call cards to all your customers (6) If you are buying the material, a swatch book is excellent and hanging up a few samples ( about 4 suits, each with a different type of collar ) in your shop is a good idea.
(7) If the customer is buying the material, you should get a few fashion magazines to show them so they can choose their styles.
(8) Organise a price list before hand so that customer can see it

I hope this help you a bit.



for



#24 tutorversal

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Posted 11 August 2016 - 07:44 PM

The least risky growth strategy for any business is to simply sell more of its current product to its current customers.






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