Jump to content


Photo

Catwalk Misfits


  • Please log in to reply
57 replies to this topic

#1 Sator

Sator

    Administrator

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,998 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sydney, Australia

Posted 18 June 2010 - 05:35 PM

I was looking again at the May issue of Rundschau, and it just struck me that these days just how terrible the cut and fit of so many runway coats are. It is equally terrible that Rundschau seems to quite uncritically give them space in their journal. You'd never see these sorts of things from journals like The Tailor & Cutter or Rundschau in the old days. Even 1980s Rundschau issues seem much more critical in what they select.

This suit from D&G made it onto the cover, no less, of the journal. Look at those awful drags around the front of the coat. The chest and shoulders, on the other hand fit like an overcoat:

Posted Image

This comes from the same May issue:

Posted Image

Is it just me that finds it really sad that stuff like this is allowed to pass as being "fashion"?

#2 Martin Stall

Martin Stall

    Wizard

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 979 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Spain

Posted 18 June 2010 - 05:48 PM

You ain't seen nothing yet.

I mean COME ON! The guy didn't even button his shirt all the way down!

Attached Files


Edited by Martin Stall, 18 June 2010 - 05:50 PM.

Sure, I believe your work rocks, but... have you considered, how are you going to sell that stuff?

http: under construction...

#3 Sator

Sator

    Administrator

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,998 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sydney, Australia

Posted 18 June 2010 - 05:52 PM

^ At least they seem to have managed an "anatomical" fit. :Big Grin:

#4 Sator

Sator

    Administrator

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,998 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sydney, Australia

Posted 18 June 2010 - 05:59 PM

1960s:

Posted Image

2010 (Rundschau April, 2010):

Posted Image

Both are fashion forward, but there is no comparison in the level of overall garment making skill on display. The modern one looks amateurish by comparison - the fit terrible. They have turned tastelessness into an art form. :Shocked:

#5 Sator

Sator

    Administrator

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,998 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sydney, Australia

Posted 18 June 2010 - 06:22 PM

Also, why do I get the feeling that most men's coats from these designers are cut off ladies' patterns? Here, for instance, is a bolero jacket (from Rundschau, April 2010):

Posted Image

But the front gapes way too much and it's nowhere near as cute as this one:

Posted Image

#6 Martin Stall

Martin Stall

    Wizard

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 979 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Spain

Posted 18 June 2010 - 07:37 PM

^ At least they seem to have managed an "anatomical" fit. :Big Grin:


Harumpf. I see draep.
Sure, I believe your work rocks, but... have you considered, how are you going to sell that stuff?

http: under construction...

#7 Sator

Sator

    Administrator

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,998 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sydney, Australia

Posted 18 June 2010 - 08:16 PM

Also known as the droop cut. It permits a greater amount of extra standing room especially when hand sewn. :blush:

#8 Martin Stall

Martin Stall

    Wizard

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 979 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Spain

Posted 18 June 2010 - 09:58 PM

By the way Sator, (forgive me or being a dinosaur) but can you please explain how to post an image in a thread, as opposed to a thumbnail or hosted img?
Sure, I believe your work rocks, but... have you considered, how are you going to sell that stuff?

http: under construction...

#9 Sator

Sator

    Administrator

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,998 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sydney, Australia

Posted 18 June 2010 - 10:36 PM

I don't really know if you can embed a photo without it being a hosted image - on any forum software, not just IPB. To embed hosted images and video:

Images

Video

#10 Martin Stall

Martin Stall

    Wizard

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 979 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Spain

Posted 19 June 2010 - 01:11 AM

Thanks Sator.
Sure, I believe your work rocks, but... have you considered, how are you going to sell that stuff?

http: under construction...

#11 Kim Pattern

Kim Pattern

    Umsie

  • Senior Apprentice
  • Pip
  • 83 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 19 June 2010 - 02:17 AM

hahaha sorry about songzio. Some of my colleague work for songzio. :pardon:

#12 Martin Stall

Martin Stall

    Wizard

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 979 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Spain

Posted 19 June 2010 - 02:22 AM

He did that design? Then your colleagues must be very well dressed I imagine.
Sure, I believe your work rocks, but... have you considered, how are you going to sell that stuff?

http: under construction...

#13 Kim Pattern

Kim Pattern

    Umsie

  • Senior Apprentice
  • Pip
  • 83 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 19 June 2010 - 02:23 AM

2010 (Rundschau April, 2010):

Posted Image


How would you fix that crease in the waist line? is this possible to have no crease in that region in the one button jacket which has lowered button and very slender waist?

#14 Kim Pattern

Kim Pattern

    Umsie

  • Senior Apprentice
  • Pip
  • 83 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 19 June 2010 - 02:42 AM

He did that design? Then your colleagues must be very well dressed I imagine.



nope. he's not a designer but a maker. But I'm not sure he made that piece in the picture.
Anyway, Songzio's cloth are 100% machine made thus has poor canvas in the clothes. So cannot be as good as clothes from tailoring houses.
I agree that most of our designer's jacket has that crease at waist in the one-button jacket.
They all show simliar problem. Plus, it seems designers' intention to show some extra bulky or drapy look in the gray jacket which might look ridiculous to cutter's eye. I think desginer's collection piece cannot be as perfect as high class tailoring house. They have to digest tons of making schedule and designer sometimes have different eye compare to tailors. For example, that crease on the waist line is defintely a problem, but it seems many designers don't care about it. I see it even in dolce & gabanna's jacket. :blush:
  • Sator likes this

#15 CoronarJunkee

CoronarJunkee

    Apprentice

  • Super Pro
  • PipPip
  • 169 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Berlin, Germany

Posted 19 June 2010 - 02:55 AM

How would you fix that crease in the waist line? is this possible to have no crease in that region in the one button jacket which has lowered button and very slender waist?


I'd say that the front is too long compared to the back and the jacket is lacking width in the waist area and gets dragged outwards. Also, due to the too long front, the closed button drags up the jacket front a bit towards the natural waistline (so that the tension line is horizontal and not lower in the front than in the back). At the same time, the canvas pushes the front downwards from the shoulder and that accentuates the creases. At the hips, it's awful. looks like the canvas is wavy under the outer material.

And the guys shoulders are too straight for the jacket (or the used shoulder pads). Or better : the jacket isn't cut for this guy but for a standard body with a different shoulder slope. This makes the fronts swing a bit back-/outwards and closing the button creates the creases/tension near the armhole.

At least that's my opinion.
So I would :
-cut straighter shoulders
-cut a longer back or a shorter front (depending on if you want the waist higher or lower)
-let out a bit on both panel seams beneath the waist to allow for the hips

I didn't experience it but it is certainly possible to achieve a very waisted look without a drag at the waistline. It has to have the desired shape already before the button is closed. As a proof, you just have to look at women's jackets of the 50s which don't necessarily have more seams (in the front) than a man's jacket. (I know, i know, the make up is different but I think you could achieve a similar result for a man's jacket) You would have to shape the fabric quite a bit to get the ease where needed but with a canvas cut accordingly, maybe in 2 pieces...?

And now, let's see what the pro's (I'm a pro, too, but not THAT kind of pro) say :-)

Cheers
David
  • Sator likes this

#16 Nishijin

Nishijin

    Master

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,704 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Paris, France.
  • Interests:Mainly tailoring it seems, but my friends know better...

Posted 19 June 2010 - 03:19 AM

How would you fix that crease in the waist line? is this possible to have no crease in that region in the one button jacket which has lowered button and very slender waist?


Here is my theory (given my small experience, I may be wrong) :
I think there is too much waist suppression in the front of the coat, and more specifically in the center front line. This coat is not "intended" to be worn buttoned.

It also seems that the chest width is exagerated (this can be intended for "style"), which may have caused the problem in the first place... (if the designer added "ease" at the wrong place : back enlarged, waist suppressed... and forgot the center front line...)


There might be a problem at the neck point too, which seems too crooked (I confess I find it hard to "read" this on a coat with so much waist suppression).





Re bolero :
This is a bolero for men.

Posted Image
Credit : http://lopezina.skyr...-Lescarret.html

Note the high rise of the trousers, needed because of the short "waist" of a bolero...
  • Sator likes this
http://www.paulgrassart.com

Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society.
Mark Twain

#17 Nishijin

Nishijin

    Master

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,704 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Paris, France.
  • Interests:Mainly tailoring it seems, but my friends know better...

Posted 19 June 2010 - 03:31 AM

It has to have the desired shape already before the button is closed.


At fitting, I find it very usefull to check, after I made the necessary corrections, that the coat falls the way I want it without closing it. The button is a "safety", not the device that closes the coat.
To do that, you have to understand the role of each seam and dart.

Basic skills in molding (excuse my French... it is "moulage" in French, I suddenly have a doubt about the English word) are very usefull. I'm very surprised, as I would think a Dolce & Gabana designer had a training in molding...
  • Sator and Mooshi like this
http://www.paulgrassart.com

Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society.
Mark Twain

#18 Martin Stall

Martin Stall

    Wizard

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 979 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Spain

Posted 19 June 2010 - 03:32 AM

There is so much wrong with that one,. I don't even want to start.
  • Sator likes this
Sure, I believe your work rocks, but... have you considered, how are you going to sell that stuff?

http: under construction...




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users