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The Best of the 1950s


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#37 Sator

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Posted 28 September 2011 - 10:07 PM

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Gustav Mahler (1860-1911): "Tradition ist die Weitergabe des Feuers und nicht die Anbetung der Asche."

"Tradition is about passing on the flame, and not the worshipping of ashes"

#38 Sator

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Posted 28 September 2011 - 11:08 PM

Romy Schneider being fitted by Coco Chanel:

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Balenciaga:

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Unknown tailor/dressmaker - 1956:

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Gustav Mahler (1860-1911): "Tradition ist die Weitergabe des Feuers und nicht die Anbetung der Asche."

"Tradition is about passing on the flame, and not the worshipping of ashes"

#39 Sator

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Posted 30 September 2011 - 11:47 AM

Pierre Cardin 1959:

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Model Sophie Malgat in 1952:

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Gustav Mahler (1860-1911): "Tradition ist die Weitergabe des Feuers und nicht die Anbetung der Asche."

"Tradition is about passing on the flame, and not the worshipping of ashes"

#40 Sator

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Posted 30 September 2011 - 01:05 PM

Model Sophie Malgat in Life (tailor unknown):

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The model Dovima in 1955:

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I am not sure of when this comes from but it looks very 1950s:

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Gustav Mahler (1860-1911): "Tradition ist die Weitergabe des Feuers und nicht die Anbetung der Asche."

"Tradition is about passing on the flame, and not the worshipping of ashes"

#41 inceptor

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Posted 01 October 2011 - 03:44 AM

Thank you Sator for those models. I find some of them particularly interesting.
I will not give an opinion on all my favorite, but I note specialy on the red garment :
the position of the pockets, and the buttons in the front of the skirt who make a repetition with those of the jacket.
I think also that the model with the darts on the outside is very interesting to mark the cut (although I preferred a simple collar, it's a personal taste
but its achievement is notable-)
See these achievements (obviously handmade in the tradition) give ideas for current projects.

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#42 inceptor

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Posted 01 October 2011 - 03:50 AM

Created by Jacques Fath :

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#43 Sator

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Posted 18 November 2011 - 09:34 PM

Balenciaga, 1955:

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Gustav Mahler (1860-1911): "Tradition ist die Weitergabe des Feuers und nicht die Anbetung der Asche."

"Tradition is about passing on the flame, and not the worshipping of ashes"

#44 Sator

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Posted 18 November 2011 - 09:38 PM

Marilyn Monroe in the 1953 film Niagara. It's quite hard to find photos of her wearing suits:

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Gustav Mahler (1860-1911): "Tradition ist die Weitergabe des Feuers und nicht die Anbetung der Asche."

"Tradition is about passing on the flame, and not the worshipping of ashes"

#45 Dirk

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Posted 11 April 2012 - 04:35 AM

I would somewhat like to see a "Best of the 40's" or 30's. Though in the 30's women wore dresses quite a bit more than suits, they did involve tailoring, and it is always nice for a historian to look into the past as much as he can.

That is if tailoring was even as prevalent back then, as I don't know much of the history of womens tailoring.

Edited by Dirk, 11 April 2012 - 04:36 AM.


#46 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 11 April 2012 - 12:48 PM

There is a lot of sick waist suppression in the 50thies, don't work today anymore.

Schneidern heisst, viel Wissen, viel Arbeit und keine Kohle im Sack, dafuer aber viele Kunden, die alles besser wissen.  :Big Grin:


#47 trovatore

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Posted 20 April 2012 - 02:13 AM

There is a lot of sick waist suppression in the 50thies, don't work today anymore.


I wouldn't call that waist suppression "sick", just because it isn't currently in fashion.
Today's clothes aren't any more reasonable than the clothes of the past.
On the streets today you see women in extreme platform high heels that the women wearing those fifties suits would have thought absurd.
N'est ce pas?

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#48 Schneidergott

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Posted 21 April 2012 - 12:44 AM

All I can say is that, in general, women were better dressed in the 50s and 60s than they are now.
What you can see today are girls and women dressed in extremely tight clothes that are neither comfortable nor classy and don't make them look good. It's not a matter of financial possibilities, it's a matter of taste lost in the decades of leisure wear. And that of RTW companies, which make more money by selling extremely cheap stuff at relatively high prices.
But dressing in a way that is not in relation to ones body type/ physique is a problem that women and men share.

Just recently I had the questionable pleasure of meeting a young woman who insisted to emphasize the already over-proportioned lower part of her body (wide hips and long full legs) by wearing very short jackets, which hem hardly covered the waistband of her trousers.
According to her a longer jacket is something reserved for older women. She definitely had a very twisted vision of herself.

"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

"Es gibt keinen Grund mit Erfahrung zu prahlen, denn man kann etwas auch viele Jahre falsch machen!"
"There is no reason to boast of your experience, because it's possible to do things wrong for a long time!"


#49 ACECAPS

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Posted 21 April 2012 - 06:28 PM

can i have her phone number ?:spiteful:

#50 Dirk

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Posted 06 May 2012 - 10:25 PM

It seems like women today want to look as much a vixen and 'sexy' as possible (Not speaking of all women, naturally). It is really quite annoying to be honest, because most of the time it just makes them look like a streetwalker, stripped of their dignity, humility, modesty, et cetera. While if you look at these pictures of yore, the women have an inherent beauty of character, true elegance you could say, while certainly adding to the physical attraction.

Trovatore: I believe that Zuschneider doesn't mean sick, as in twisted, but as somebody from New England might say, "wicked".

Edited by Dirk, 06 May 2012 - 10:31 PM.


#51 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 07 May 2012 - 02:17 PM

Yes 'wicked' is a better word.

Schneidern heisst, viel Wissen, viel Arbeit und keine Kohle im Sack, dafuer aber viele Kunden, die alles besser wissen.  :Big Grin:


#52 tailleuse

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Posted 17 May 2012 - 09:04 AM

All I can say is that, in general, women were better dressed in the 50s and 60s than they are now.
What you can see today are girls and women dressed in extremely tight clothes that are neither comfortable nor classy and don't make them look good. It's not a matter of financial possibilities, it's a matter of taste lost in the decades of leisure wear. And that of RTW companies, which make more money by selling extremely cheap stuff at relatively high prices.
But dressing in a way that is not in relation to ones body type/ physique is a problem that women and men share.

Just recently I had the questionable pleasure of meeting a young woman who insisted to emphasize the already over-proportioned lower part of her body (wide hips and long full legs) by wearing very short jackets, which hem hardly covered the waistband of her trousers.
According to her a longer jacket is something reserved for older women. She definitely had a very twisted vision of herself.


Proper fit, taste and style have to be taught. Good clothes are expensive. I hate the hooker look. But what I really hate are tattoos.
Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)

#53 Schneidergott

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Posted 17 May 2012 - 04:29 PM

But what I really hate are tattoos.


Yeah, nothing says "I'm classy!" like a nice tramp stamp!:cheer:

"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

"Es gibt keinen Grund mit Erfahrung zu prahlen, denn man kann etwas auch viele Jahre falsch machen!"
"There is no reason to boast of your experience, because it's possible to do things wrong for a long time!"


#54 tailleuse

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Posted 30 May 2012 - 10:09 AM

Yeah, nothing says "I'm classy!" like a nice tramp stamp!:cheer:


On another forum I visit, there's a "Miscellaneous" section. Occasionally, someone will post an image of an absolutely hideous and garish thing they want incised into their flesh. Forever. Everyone else is saying, "Great!" I say:

DON'T DO IT! Posted Image Posted Image

I never check for responses. I'm sure they think I'm a huge rhymes with "Witch."

In 20 years or less, there's going to be a new genre of article: The Tattoo Remorse story. Wait and see.
Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)




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