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Ironwork for a Rundschau lounge coat


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#19 zokiTzar

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Posted 07 September 2010 - 08:12 PM

great post
even for beginner as me , you see this is of great importance
fro example this rechecking of adjacent seams on paper pattern it a big help but I never saw that in any of the books or posts?
stuff like this can help you not waste hours , especially if you are learning on your own like most of us newbies here are
thanks again

#20 Nishijin

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Posted 08 September 2010 - 12:02 AM

You should always check your seams when you have finished your pattern. There are very few seams which need easing, all others should have same length. With a bit of experience, you'll incorporate this directly while drafting.

You must not forget to take future ironwork in consideration, though. Sometimes, one side of a seam is stretched/shrinked, and not the other. So it is expected that they do not match on the pattern. With experience, you anticipate the amount of ironwork you'll put in.


Ironwork is not required for beginners. Rundschau already gives pretty good results without ironwork (I'm sure that is why it is so used in RTW).
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#21 Schneidergott

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Posted 20 December 2010 - 05:45 AM

In RTW factories they do ironwork/ shaping, too, just not by hand.
They use certain presses and bucks to get a shape into a garment or the single parts, like this one: http://www.hoffman-b... Dressieren.pdf
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#22 jcsprowls

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Posted 20 December 2010 - 08:13 AM

Um... we use presses, yes. But, sample shops - like mine - emulate the press shaping using irons & bucks.
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#23 Kim Pattern

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Posted 05 February 2011 - 11:38 PM

Schneidergott,

"Abb.55: The front is shrunk, this shortens the bridle as well as the lapel."

What does 'bridle' mean?

Sorry for poor English skill :(

#24 Schneidergott

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Posted 06 February 2011 - 12:07 AM

Schneidergott,

"Abb.55: The front is shrunk, this shortens the bridle as well as the lapel."

What does 'bridle' mean?



It's basically the lapel fold line which later gets secured by a stay tape (linen or straight lining tape)!

"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

http://www.dressedwell.net/ It's snarky, but fun.


#25 jukes

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Posted 08 February 2011 - 06:10 AM

Great article SG. Possibly the only in depth one on iron work. This should be pinned

#26 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 08 February 2011 - 03:13 PM

You should always check your seams when you have finished your pattern. There are very few seams which need easing, all others should have same length. With a bit of experience, you'll incorporate this directly while drafting.

You must not forget to take future ironwork in consideration, though. Sometimes, one side of a seam is stretched/shrinked, and not the other. So it is expected that they do not match on the pattern. With experience, you anticipate the amount of ironwork you'll put in.


Ironwork is not required for beginners. Rundschau already gives pretty good results without ironwork (I'm sure that is why it is so used in RTW).


Only with the Mueller-System you can handle 7oz and synthetic fabric, cause the big iron work is incorporated in the pattern, you only iron form, still with the same old technique but only light forming not messing with the fabric design, stripes and Caro. The system is used from almost all bespoke tailors in Germany. In East Germany they use an improved Rundschau-Mueller-System.
www.berlinbespokesuits.com

#27 Jake K

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Posted 09 February 2011 - 04:00 AM

Oh boy is it nice to finally see this in English!!

Thanks SG
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#28 Jake K

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Posted 09 February 2011 - 04:17 AM

It's basically the lapel fold line which later gets secured by a stay tape (linen or straight lining tape)!


A lot of people use a twill tape too. You pull it slightly while basting it on.
Jacob Kozinn
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