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Vintage Irons


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#1 J.Kelner

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Posted 30 September 2010 - 09:36 AM

What info might people have on old vintage electric irons?

I just found a GE Hotpoint Iron from (assumptively the 1930's according to other irons like it on websites) Catalog #159F62. 115 Volt, 500 Watt. No adjustement dials, just an on/off switch. It got fairly hot at the antique store, so I bought it.

I feared that when I brought it home it simply wouldn't get hot enough. But oh baby, was I wrong. When I brought it home, let it heat up, and tried it on a scrap piece of wool, it pressed it almost instantly. Woot, I thought! But then, I could smell the fibers starting to burn.

I added some sprinkles of water with my left hand. PSSTTT! Sure enough, within a few more seconds of rubbing and stretching, a hole formed in the fabric. Leftover fibers were clinging onto the iron's edges.

I got another spare piece, put a piece of dampened (almost drenched) Osnaburg cotton to try as a temporary pressing cloth, and sure enough, THOSE fibers started getting brown, too,even while fully dampened.

I then started noticing that the pointed nose of the stainless steel started blackening. This can't be right.

Are modern US electric circuits simply incompatible with old irons? Do I need a converter? I can't imagine being able to do something like THIS on fabric when it's burning so hot.

#2 J.Kelner

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Posted 30 September 2010 - 09:40 AM

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Edited by J. Kelner, 30 September 2010 - 09:41 AM.


#3 amateursarto

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Posted 30 September 2010 - 09:57 AM

This iron is even more powerful than that one. I have a similar one as well as a gravity fed iron.

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#4 J.Kelner

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Posted 30 September 2010 - 12:47 PM

Does yours do what this one was doing? I mean I'm serious, it was really harsh on the fabric.

#5 J.Kelner

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Posted 30 September 2010 - 01:02 PM

Hmm....

http://wiki.answers....o_a_120V_outlet

"Can you plug a 115V appliance into a 120V outlet?"

The short answer is yes. 110V appliances can work with up to 130V without being burnt, additionally, 220V appliances can work with up to 240V without being burnt.


Hmm. So that apparently isn't the issue, then. I wonder what the problem could be.

#6 Schneidergott

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Posted 30 September 2010 - 02:31 PM

Without a thermostat (which acts like an on/off switch) the iron keeps heating up, so you have to unplug it or switch it off to prevent damage to the fabrics or garments.
For additional safety use a moist pressing cloth!
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#7 Martin Stall

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Posted 30 September 2010 - 03:03 PM

I've seen external thermostats in London. That would solve your problem.
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#8 J.Kelner

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Posted 30 September 2010 - 05:02 PM

Awesome! This completely solves my question. Thanks. :)

#9 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 30 September 2010 - 09:31 PM

Yes, Mr. Kelner

What you want to do (and this takes... what's the word?... experience) is to let it heat up. periodically as it heats up you want to make the iron speak. You know it's the right temp as soon as striking the iron with moist fingers you get a good pitched "SPPPPPSSSSSS". Unplug and use the iron in quick movements to get your desired effect. You can't massage the cloth like you did in your video. Each movement must be solid and deliberate.
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#10 Martin Stall

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Posted 30 September 2010 - 09:40 PM

I feel a video instructional coming on....
Sure, I believe your work rocks, but... have you considered, how are you going to sell that stuff?

http: under construction...

#11 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 01 October 2010 - 05:38 AM

Yes, Mr. Kelner

What you want to do (and this takes... what's the word?... experience) is to let it heat up. periodically as it heats up you want to make the iron speak. You know it's the right temp as soon as striking the iron with moist fingers you get a good pitched "SPPPPPSSSSSS".


Exactly

I have a few irons of them mostly 10 - 16 pounds heavy. Always a Kloetzelleinen underneath, between cloth and iron.
You switch the iron on and once the iron spoke loud enough you switch it off.

Edited by Der Zuschneider, 01 October 2010 - 05:40 AM.

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#12 J.Kelner

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Posted 01 October 2010 - 09:34 AM

I feel a video instructional coming on....


I could make another attempt at it with the iron if you'd like? Might be fun..

#13 Martin Stall

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Posted 01 October 2010 - 09:40 AM

go. do.
Sure, I believe your work rocks, but... have you considered, how are you going to sell that stuff?

http: under construction...

#14 Torry Kratch

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Posted 03 August 2012 - 11:17 AM

It may be useful to someone my idea for a removable device on the corner of the ironing table.

Posted ImagePosted Image Posted ImagePosted Image Posted ImagePosted Image Posted ImagePosted Image

#15 jcsprowls

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Posted 04 August 2012 - 02:49 PM

I converted a thread stand - similar idea. I'll show you once I setup the new shop.
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