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Trouser creases?


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#1 David V

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Posted 11 June 2009 - 01:07 AM

When did trousers crease first begin being worn on the front of the leg?

#2 Schneidergott

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Posted 11 June 2009 - 07:48 AM

Rumour has it that the well known member of the Royal Family got caught in the rain during a trip in the countryside and found shelter at a farm. The farmers wife pressed the trousers dry with the crease in the front, and of course he liked it and so on... I have no actual date of that "event", though. Given his birth date it must have been at least 1910 or later.
I guess that Sator might be able to provide some old fashion plates that will prove that myth wrong. Not everything was started by that Duke.

"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

http://www.dressedwell.net/ It's snarky, but fun.


#3 PocketTriangle

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Posted 12 June 2009 - 12:52 AM

Just poking around on wikipedia, the earliest picture of trousers with creases is from 1897:



There may be some earlier ones, but the picture quality of old photographs makes it hard to tell if the trousers are creased or not.

#4 NJS

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Posted 12 June 2009 - 08:46 PM

Often trousers had side to side creases - a tradition continued into the 20th Century by King George V. The strapped pantaloons that had been usual throughout most of Victoria's reign obviously had no creases at all.

<b></b>NJS<b></b>

#5 Schneidergott

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Posted 13 June 2009 - 01:29 AM

This is what I found. Apparently it was a British King, namely Edward VII. In 1896 he got wet in the rain and handed the trousers to a tailor, who then pressed them with creases in the middle. So that picture from 1897 seems to be authentic.
The same King is given the credit of inventing trouser cuffs (He just turned them up to avoid the dirt).

This is the text from the internet:

Die Bügelfalte verdanken wir keinem geringerem als dem englischen König Edward VII. Dieser geriet angeblich 1896 in einen schrecklichen Regen, und brachte seine feuchte Hose zu einem bis dahin unbekannten Schneider. Dieser bügelte die Hose, hauptsächlich um die Feuchtigkeit rauszubekommen, denn der König, und sein Hofstaat warteten. So gab er sie mit Bügelfalte zurück, und der Hofstaat klatschte artig, als der König seine Hose wieder anhatte (sie mußten wohl solange warten). Könige hatten damals einen unheimlichen Einfluss auf die Mode, und so setzte sich die Bügelfalte durch. Dem gleichen König wird auch die Erfindung des Hosenumschlags nachgesagt. Er hat sie umgeschlagen, um seine Hose vor Schmutz zu schützen.

"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

http://www.dressedwell.net/ It's snarky, but fun.


#6 PocketTriangle

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Posted 13 June 2009 - 02:44 AM

Except in 1896, Edward was just prince of Wales, as Victoria was the reigning monarch.

The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography provides some more information on Edward VII:

"The king's close attention to dress and punctuality was legendary; he reprimanded incorrect dress or wrongly worn decorations without deference to rank or diplomacy, and complained bitterly and vocally when a servant, friend, politician—or the habitually unpunctual queen—was late. He was himself fairly conservative in his dress, attempting to delay the decline of the frock coat and to revive the fashion of knee breeches with evening dress. As prince of Wales he had popularized the modern dinner jacket with black tie, and as king his wearing of a tweed suit at Goodwood and a Norfolk jacket made them fashionable. From necessity he customarily wore the bottom button of his waistcoat undone and was followed in this in Britain and the empire but not on the continent or in the USA. His wearing of the Homburg felt hat on leisure occasions led to a marked change in the headgear of his male subjects, as, to a lesser degree, did his wearing of Tyrolean hats. However, his practice of creasing his trousers at the side rather than the front did not produce frequent emulation."

This seems to confuse the issue somewhat.

#7 NJS

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Posted 13 June 2009 - 06:39 AM

In all the pictures that I recall of both Ed VII and Geo V, their trousers are pressed side to side.
<b></b>NJS<b></b>

#8 pvpatty

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Posted 13 June 2009 - 08:32 PM

QUOTE (PocketTriangle @ Jun 13 2009, 02:44 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
From necessity he customarily wore the bottom button of his waistcoat undone and was followed in this in Britain and the empire but not on the continent or in the USA.[/b]"


I find this part interesting, given that we hold the unbuttoned bottom button rule to be sacrosanct.
Paul
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#9 Sator

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Posted 24 November 2009 - 02:40 PM

Here is something from The Tailor & Cutter, 1942:

Posted Image

#10 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 03:36 AM

It was about the mid-1890's, more specifically "1896". My tailoring manual from 1895 states to turn the trousers out to remove any crease, then by 1896 we start to see creases showing up in adverts and sales brochures and by 1897 looks pretty established. So they might have been about before then, but in my collection the earliest I can find is 1896.
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#11 jukes

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 03:52 AM

Just for fun, here's a sailor from HMAS Australia (Sator's cousin ?) during "The Big One":

http://i179.photobuc...uleyjm/HMAS.jpg

The accompanying text notes that trousers were kept rolled when not in use, but were sometimes pressed in this fashion.

Any other strange variant creases out there?

British Royal Navy had eight creases, not entirely sure but i think they represent the eight bells

#12 culverwood

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 09:37 PM

The first front crease I can see in my Vanity Fair pictures is of George Gourauld (American) in 1889 then Ernest Cassel in 1899, by 1905 most pictures show front creases.

Edited by culverwood, 25 November 2009 - 09:39 PM.


#13 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 26 November 2009 - 03:32 AM

The first front crease I can see in my Vanity Fair pictures is of George Gourauld (American) in 1889 then Ernest Cassel in 1899, by 1905 most pictures show front creases.


If what you are mentioning is the caricature of George Gouraud by Ape, I would have to state this is more of an artists rendering of light than actual creases. If you look at the right trouser leg the shadowing is more blended giving a more tube shape, the left leg shadowing is a little more abrupt giving the appearance of a crease.

Having a look through some more of my materials I believe the "Fashionable" acceptance of front trouser creases to be 1896 with some fashion forward wearing it as early as spring 1895. This does coincide with a tailoring shift in the making up of trousers. Prior to this date the cutting schools were advocating working the topside with an iron prior to basting up the sides. After 1894ish we see these same schools advocating topside iron work after sewing up the sides, thus certain materials would be prone to retaining the crease from the manipulation. Thus I think it was lazy iron work on the side of the lower class trades (not removing the creases) that lead to this. I could be wrong, but it is plausable.
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