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#19 Sator

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Posted 06 December 2010 - 08:47 AM

That's ultimately up to you.

My approach is to post things that are at least about 3 decades old. It's not like you can purchase these old articles, so the firm isn't being robbed of rightful income. So you can't tell people to go buy it at a particular place, since they are decades out of print. Few, if any libraries, even in Germany hold them. Even if English readers got hold of them, they wouldn't be able to read them anyway. So what do you do? You might under these circumstances argue that it is a non-commercial educational purpose and therefore "fair usage".

I also try my best to encourage people to subscribe to Rundschau and will show links to any books that are worth buying. Overall, I think we give the firm a high amount of international exposure.

If you are concerned you can add a note saying that you are sharing an English translation for educational, non-profit reasons under fair usage. You can also place a link encouraging readers to subscribe to Rundschau. If there are any complaints we can remove the article - along with the encouragement to subscribe to the journal.

#20 MANSIE WAUCH

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Posted 07 December 2010 - 06:21 AM

Sator, I promised to post more items on the forum, but I have been sidetracked into making my grandson a jacket for Christmas! He is only 7 years old and a big fan of 'Dr Who' from British television who wears a tweed hacking jacket. What a job! I have not touched a needle in eight years, I gave my industrail machine to two students who were starting up on their own.I sold off my cutting bench and stored everthing else in the attic.
As I have stated before, my area was bespoke pattern cutting to begin with, then into the wholesale industry, then on to teaching. I have only ever made about half a dozen 'tailored' jackets myself in that time, although I have been involved with plenty in the ready made section.

I have just about finished it now, needs buttonholes (machined, no time now to learn how to make them)then pressing off.
After all the sewing, my thumbs feel like they have been through a thumbscrew, my eyes still help me thread the needle though! All the everyday equipment that we take for granted was gone, I had to improvise with odds and ends of equipment, sewed the pockets with a domestic machine (I disappeared under the table a couple of times as the little plastic foot pedal slid around the floor.

I hope you don't think I digress here, I am just adding content for people to comment on.

Edited by MANSIE WAUCH, 07 December 2010 - 06:22 AM.


#21 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 07 December 2010 - 06:33 AM

Welcome to my world Mansie :D I have a sewing machine, suction table and all that jazz at my disposal, but I feel more connected by just picking up a needle and thread. Sure it takes longer, but I feel more satisfied when done. I also find hand sewing "therapeutic" and relaxing. I have noticed, sewing nishi's waistcoat that I have to get used to sitting crosslegged again :)
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Silly Cognoscenti, Drape is for windows!

#22 tailleuse

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Posted 31 December 2010 - 02:48 PM

Sator, I promised to post more items on the forum, but I have been sidetracked into making my grandson a jacket for Christmas! He is only 7 years old and a big fan of 'Dr Who' from British television who wears a tweed hacking jacket. What a job! I have not touched a needle in eight years, I gave my industrail machine to two students who were starting up on their own.I sold off my cutting bench and stored everthing else in the attic.
As I have stated before, my area was bespoke pattern cutting to begin with, then into the wholesale industry, then on to teaching. I have only ever made about half a dozen 'tailored' jackets myself in that time, although I have been involved with plenty in the ready made section.

I have just about finished it now, needs buttonholes (machined, no time now to learn how to make them)then pressing off.
After all the sewing, my thumbs feel like they have been through a thumbscrew, my eyes still help me thread the needle though! All the everyday equipment that we take for granted was gone, I had to improvise with odds and ends of equipment, sewed the pockets with a domestic machine (I disappeared under the table a couple of times as the little plastic foot pedal slid around the floor.

I hope you don't think I digress here, I am just adding content for people to comment on.


I assume your grandson has a sonic screwdriver.



Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#23 ct3d

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Posted 14 January 2011 - 04:34 PM

As of the latest change, someone like me is barred from even replying to topics, so no 'contributions' are even possible, especially when what I would have had to ask is something that doesn't fit into *any* of the categories I am allowed in. Oh well, why are you even asking for contributions to the forum?!?

#24 Sator

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Posted 15 January 2011 - 03:07 PM

I always started this thread hoping for professional level contribution to the forum. That's because that is what the target audience of the forum is.

The Professional Fora always were professional only areas. Nothing has really changed. As before, there are still places were amateurs are welcome and can post such as the Apprentice's Forum. Only those who can prove that their abilities are up to it are allowed to ask about coatmaking. Again that is nothing new. Nothing has changed.

#25 ct3d

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Posted 17 January 2011 - 04:37 PM

Only those who can prove that their abilities are up to it are allowed to ask about coatmaking. Again that is nothing new. Nothing has changed.

That's not quite true. It is enough to post a lot of meaningless stuff just to get the post count up into the next category. Those that don't abuse the forum that way are punished.

And by the way, I don't have questions about coat making. My contribution would have been one that you yourself start threads with on a regular basis. Oh well.

#26 Nishijin

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Posted 17 January 2011 - 07:13 PM

Groups allowing access to professional sections are not a question of post count, but of proving abilities. The post-count 'status' mimicking the cursus of an apprentice tailor is just for fun.
Joining someone to a group is made by Sator based on proven abilities only. Every known professional tailor of the forum is member of the "professional" group, while some of them have a very low post count (though we would be glad to see them posting more !).
http://www.paulgrassart.com

Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society.
Mark Twain

#27 Sator

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 09:16 AM

BTW the forum is set up to reward and to nuture - not to punish those amateurs who are talented. If you can prove to a moderator that you have the skills to participate in the Advanced Apprentice's Forum doors will open for you.

This further encourages amateurs to gradually take on new and increasingly more difficult tasks to mimic the sort of step wise progression you would be expected to make in real life apprenticeship. The feedback I had gotten from the pros here has been positive.

Remember this is not a home sewing forum, but one aimed at at working professionals and to nurture skills that make people employable (whether they actually seek employment is up to the individual).

#28 napoli

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Posted 16 June 2012 - 11:11 PM

Sorry to write here.

What do you thing about a new section called, opinion about this garment fit from a newspaper or something? How to improve etc.

Thank you

#29 Nishijin

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Posted 16 June 2012 - 11:15 PM

Very, very difficult exercise.

The garment is not always shown on the person it was made for, and when it is, the posture is frequently not the one it was cut for.

I've played a lot at fit-comment on pictures (on the request of the owner of the garment). I've leaned with experience that a lot of my comments where based on things I thought I saw on a picture, but which didn't exist in reality.

On fashion pictures, garment are usually pinned behind to look good, so any comment is futile...
http://www.paulgrassart.com

Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society.
Mark Twain

#30 napoli

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Posted 16 June 2012 - 11:21 PM

Very, very difficult exercise.

The garment is not always shown on the person it was made for, and when it is, the posture is frequently not the one it was cut for.

I've played a lot at fit-comment on pictures (on the request of the owner of the garment). I've leaned with experience that a lot of my comments where based on things I thought I saw on a picture, but which didn't exist in reality.

On fashion pictures, garment are usually pinned behind to look good, so any comment is futile...



Not always,

How would you rate this ( crap ) , this shirt is awful and is made by the " best " shirtmaker of Madrid with 50 years of experience, see how the shoulders are way off, the sleeves are double it´s ideal diameter,is baggy as hell and the fit is worse than from a rtw random size Zara. The jacket is simply a crime.

http://www.elaristocrata.com/

I don´t write there anymore. I am tired of see how my partner was bribed for this " tailors " and my dignity doesn´t allowed me to follow.

Edited by napoli, 16 June 2012 - 11:22 PM.


#31 Nishijin

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Posted 16 June 2012 - 11:24 PM

I just have zero interest in analysis like "see how this is crap". You just learn nothing from them, it's a pure waste of time.

I'm more interested in comments like "how can we make this better". But I know that it's damn hard to do, because pictures are frequenly misleading.


If anything, I think something that could be usefull for beginners would be analysing the posture of people on pictures.
http://www.paulgrassart.com

Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society.
Mark Twain

#32 greger

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Posted 17 June 2012 - 08:35 AM

How would you rate this ( crap ) , this shirt is awful and is made by the " best " shirtmaker of Madrid with 50 years of experience, see how the shoulders are way off, the sleeves are double itīs ideal diameter,is baggy as hell and the fit is worse than from a rtw random size Zara. The jacket is simply a crime.

http://www.elaristocrata.com/

I donīt write there anymore. I am tired of see how my partner was bribed for this " tailors " and my dignity doesnīt allowed me to follow.



I find this rather interesting. If you showed my granddad a nice looking shirt you would get an education that looks does not make a good shirt. He would point out the cut here is wrong because of, and the cut there is wrong because of, and the cut is wrong there because it prevents something somewhere else, etc. And then there is the method of sewing.... It is best to learn so to understand. Understanding is mind opening. Once you understand something then you are capable of inventing new reasoning to create new methods that are sound. Some tailors are good at making something really well because they were told how but never really understood why he was taught to do something a certain way. So in that they are a slave to thier methods.

Some shirts are made to be worn under a coat, and all that matters is what is seen of the shirt is a good presentation and doesn't interfer with the coat and is comfortable. To make one of these shirts correct there are several dozens of criteria that normal people will never think of. So, while you think it is simple and low class, if made by and expert, it is not.

#33 napoli

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Posted 17 June 2012 - 10:45 AM

I find this rather interesting. If you showed my granddad a nice looking shirt you would get an education that looks does not make a good shirt. He would point out the cut here is wrong because of, and the cut there is wrong because of, and the cut is wrong there because it prevents something somewhere else, etc. And then there is the method of sewing.... It is best to learn so to understand. Understanding is mind opening. Once you understand something then you are capable of inventing new reasoning to create new methods that are sound. Some tailors are good at making something really well because they were told how but never really understood why he was taught to do something a certain way. So in that they are a slave to thier methods.

Some shirts are made to be worn under a coat, and all that matters is what is seen of the shirt is a good presentation and doesn't interfer with the coat and is comfortable. To make one of these shirts correct there are several dozens of criteria that normal people will never think of. So, while you think it is simple and low class, if made by and expert, it is not.



I sent that link to the best italian shirt masters and all told me that shirt is an absolute shame and they would be instantly fired if they ever did a shirt as that,, the shoulder is way off etc etc, what an " expert "...( Not you I mean )

And that shirt is not made to be worn under a coat as it has HORIZONTAL stripes , to show how special the owner ( and pretentious ) he is is not a solid color shirt to be on an office with a jacket on .

Edited by napoli, 17 June 2012 - 10:47 AM.


#34 Schneidergott

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Posted 17 June 2012 - 11:31 PM

A foto usually exaggerates things you wouldn't spot in real life. Light and shadow can trick the eye, plus the angle of the camera lens used will distort lines.

There are a couple of things in the suit and the shirt I don't like or that I would have done differently, but we don't know what the customer demanded in the first place. He seems happy and pleased enough to have those pictures taken, so why should we care?

"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

http://www.dressedwell.net/ It's snarky, but fun.


#35 greger

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Posted 22 June 2012 - 10:05 AM

Not sure which shirt was speaking of so I was writing to written content here. Some tailors are narrow minded and know only about what they like, so everything else is wrong. If you want to learn then be open minded and over time you find out who knows the most about what. Fancy talk and great showing is maybe where some have their skill and not shirt making. Some are boring but know how to make the best. Also, a group does not always mean more is right. For example, in America there were many American tailors, but I never cared for their work, but the few that I liked means that the majority wasn't by default right. Then there are regional beliefs and expectations, these are not always better, either. What it really boils down to is having the knowledge and skills to please the customer as Schneidergott points out. Afterall, if you shove the customer what you want and not what he wants will he come back? Generally, if local tailors are busy making certain shirts it is wise to be able to make the same, but not be limited to it.

#36 Jenny Woodentop

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 10:51 PM

Forums cost money to run. However, they take up even more time and this is a more valuable asset than anything else.

If you see even a tiny scrap of information which you like here, please think of contributing. I don't ask you to contribute money. I only ask that you contribute even a second of your time, by sharing just a little drop of knowledge. It doesn't have to be something major. It can be a little tip for beginners only. It can just be a tiny comment about someone's posts like "this is an important point and I agree with this".

So please, if you see anything you like here, consider giving just a tiny bit back to the forum. Feel free to take what you like here, but it is nice when people also give back a little to keep the forum alive.




Jenny Woodentop




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