Jump to content


Photo

Dress breeches


  • This topic is locked This topic is locked
93 replies to this topic

#19 NJS

NJS

    Journeyman

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 376 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:South America

Posted 08 January 2011 - 09:52 AM

I 'spec' that you will be questioned about it! As for kilts: "no gentleman ever wore a kilt south of Wick."
<b></b>NJS<b></b>

#20 greger

greger

    Master

  • Senior Professional
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,122 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Washington, USA

Posted 08 January 2011 - 03:06 PM

I have more reason for wearing breeches than I do with wearing a kilt if questioned about it...


Not going to dye your hair red, huh?

It is nice to see somebody likes breeches.

#21 Charles R Bingley

Charles R Bingley

    Umsie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 98 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Birmingham, UK
  • Interests:Formal dress, academic dress, guqin and music, etc.

Posted 09 January 2011 - 12:29 AM

Well, if I get questioned I'd say I'm wearing a more formal version of white tie and that will be that. If I wear a kilt I can't give a legit reason why I am wearing it: can't say I'm a Scotsman, can't say I'm in Scotland trying to blend in with the locals (who I know often don't wear kilts anyway), can't say I've been made a member of some clan (in which case, why am I wearing it outside Scotland and not on St. Andrew's, etc Day), can't say...

Nothing short of Letters Patent from HM The Queen granting me the right to do so will do...

Edited by Charles R Bingley, 09 January 2011 - 12:33 AM.

Causam cedare non habet eo

#22 Charles R Bingley

Charles R Bingley

    Umsie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 98 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Birmingham, UK
  • Interests:Formal dress, academic dress, guqin and music, etc.

Posted 11 January 2011 - 03:50 AM

Got a reply from Military Metalwork concerning black knee buckles for breeches. They can lacquer coat brass buckles but the enamel could chip easily over time. The other way is to electroplate or powder coat but this would be too expensive for a one off and so must at least order 10-15 pairs...

I'd have thought that they'll have a good supply of black buckles given the court dress regulations... Anyways, must decide whether to get the black enamelled ones or the silver plated...

Edited by Charles R Bingley, 11 January 2011 - 03:51 AM.

Causam cedare non habet eo

#23 J. Maclochlainn

J. Maclochlainn

    Master

  • Senior Professional
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,127 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 11 January 2011 - 04:19 AM

I was only kidding, I would like to see a full formal highland attire on this board.
Silly Cognoscenti, Drape is for windows!

#24 I.Brackley

I.Brackley

    Apprentice

  • Senior Apprentice
  • PipPip
  • 270 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ontario, Canada
  • Interests:History, art theory, subculture anthropology

Posted 11 January 2011 - 07:55 AM

"no gentleman ever wore a kilt south of Wick."



Oh dear.
I just looked up Wick on a map.
:pinch: ... :LMAO: :rofl:
"The possibilities that exist in the portrayal of personality constitute the strongest, and in fact the only unanswerable argument for the supremacy of Custom Tailoring"

-F.T. Croonborg, c. 1917

#25 J. Maclochlainn

J. Maclochlainn

    Master

  • Senior Professional
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,127 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 11 January 2011 - 08:12 AM

yup it's up there
Silly Cognoscenti, Drape is for windows!

#26 Noble Savage

Noble Savage

    Apprentice

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 136 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 12 January 2011 - 12:11 AM

Oh dear.
I just looked up Wick on a map.
:pinch: ... :LMAO: :rofl:


There's another Wick that is almost in France.

#27 Joe Zasada

Joe Zasada

    Umsie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 6 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Beaumont, Alberta, Canada

Posted 12 January 2011 - 04:06 AM

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police still wear breeches as part of their dress 'red serge' uniform - theirs are midnight blue and have a yellow stripe down the side. Not 'white tie evening dress' but still interesting.

http://upload.wikime..._on_a_horse.JPG

http://upload.wikime...h_serge_(1).jpg

Edited by Joe Zasada, 12 January 2011 - 04:07 AM.


#28 I.Brackley

I.Brackley

    Apprentice

  • Senior Apprentice
  • PipPip
  • 270 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ontario, Canada
  • Interests:History, art theory, subculture anthropology

Posted 12 January 2011 - 11:36 PM

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police still wear breeches as part of their dress 'red serge' uniform



Quite a different animal from full dress evening wear breeches. The RCMP's uniform article should be properly thought of in terms of being riding breeches. The distinctive 'bulge' or fullness in the thigh gives them claim to properly be called johdpurs.

What makes them rather different from dress knee breeches is that jodhpurs are sewn with overlying panels for reienforcement in areas where they meet the saddle (inseams). Proper riding breeches are thus built like tanks. Dress breeches on the other hand aren't built for the rough work of riding anymore than an evening tailcoat is built for cutting lumber in.
Also the knee closures on jodhpurs are very unlike those of dress knee breeches, consisting commonly of front facing lacing which can be as functional and utilitarian as need be as it all dissapears down the boot anyway. Dress breeches knee closures are very much on display hence the attention given to the side seam mounted buckles, buttons and as seen above, ribbons and rosettes.
Dress knee breeches are slender and form fitting, jodhpurs are intended to be 'roomy', etc.
IN conclusion while the RCMP 'dress' uniform includes breeches (of a specific sort) they should not be confused with dress breeches.
"The possibilities that exist in the portrayal of personality constitute the strongest, and in fact the only unanswerable argument for the supremacy of Custom Tailoring"

-F.T. Croonborg, c. 1917

#29 Nishijin

Nishijin

    Master

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,704 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Paris, France.
  • Interests:Mainly tailoring it seems, but my friends know better...

Posted 13 January 2011 - 12:25 AM

Johdpurs are not breeches with "buldge" on the thigh, those are just riding breeches. Johdpurs are breeches with a "grown on" legging : they don't stop just under the knee, but have a close-fitting extension that goes to the ankle.

As far as I know, riding breeches and trousers are not only cut with reinforcement on the inner leg, but the seams themselves are moved away, so they are not where the leg is in contact with the horse.

The buldge is needed for "traditional" breeches, to give room for a very confortable garment cut in traditionnal wool or cotton (typically a cavalry twill). Todays garments may be cut in a stretch cloth (and they usually are), in which case the buldge is not required.
They would still look very different from dress breeches, which is you main point anyway, and to which I fully agree.
http://www.paulgrassart.com

Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society.
Mark Twain

#30 Noble Savage

Noble Savage

    Apprentice

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 136 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 02 February 2011 - 06:30 PM

Posted ImagePosted Image

1953 --- Mr. Walter Cronkite trying on the formal attire at Brooks Costume Company which correspondents will be required to wear at the coronation of Queen Elizabeth at Westminster Abbey. Mr. Cronkite will cover the coronation for the CBS television network. Costume consists of knee breeches, dickey and formal white tie, velvet cutaway coat with eight buttons and lace cuffs, long black stockings and patent leather shoes with buckles.

Edited by Noble Savage, 02 February 2011 - 06:39 PM.


#31 Charles R Bingley

Charles R Bingley

    Umsie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 98 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Birmingham, UK
  • Interests:Formal dress, academic dress, guqin and music, etc.

Posted 02 February 2011 - 08:37 PM

Posted ImagePosted Image

1953 --- Mr. Walter Cronkite trying on the formal attire at Brooks Costume Company which correspondents will be required to wear at the coronation of Queen Elizabeth at Westminster Abbey. Mr. Cronkite will cover the coronation for the CBS television network. Costume consists of knee breeches, dickey and formal white tie, velvet cutaway coat with eight buttons and lace cuffs, long black stockings and patent leather shoes with buckles.


Well, 'costume' is correct as the whole ensemble is incorrect!
Causam cedare non habet eo

#32 Nishijin

Nishijin

    Master

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,704 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Paris, France.
  • Interests:Mainly tailoring it seems, but my friends know better...

Posted 02 February 2011 - 09:52 PM

How on Earth can this ensemble be "incorrect" when it was the prescribe outfit from protocol office ? At this kind of event, you wear what you are told to.
http://www.paulgrassart.com

Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society.
Mark Twain

#33 J. Maclochlainn

J. Maclochlainn

    Master

  • Senior Professional
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,127 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 03 February 2011 - 02:19 AM

NOSFERATU!!!!
see how irritating that is?
  • I.Brackley likes this
Silly Cognoscenti, Drape is for windows!

#34 Charles R Bingley

Charles R Bingley

    Umsie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 98 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Birmingham, UK
  • Interests:Formal dress, academic dress, guqin and music, etc.

Posted 03 February 2011 - 04:38 AM

How on Earth can this ensemble be "incorrect" when it was the prescribe outfit from protocol office? At this kind of event, you wear what you are told to.


If you read the Dress Worn at His Majesty's Court book, you'll know why. Actually, you just need to look at how the thing is assembled to know it is wrong: no shirt, a dickie(?!), not steel cut buttons, breeches and coat fabric do not match, lace cuffs yet a bow tie and not a lace stock, putting on the stockings after putting on the breeches (which look too short)... The guy who sanctioned such an outfit as acceptable dress for a coronation should be sacked. Better to have correct court dress or advise people to wear morning dress.
Causam cedare non habet eo

#35 J. Maclochlainn

J. Maclochlainn

    Master

  • Senior Professional
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,127 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 03 February 2011 - 04:47 AM

I believe a certain amount of ignorance is allowed in the case of Americans :spiteful: :poke:
Silly Cognoscenti, Drape is for windows!

#36 Charles R Bingley

Charles R Bingley

    Umsie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 98 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Birmingham, UK
  • Interests:Formal dress, academic dress, guqin and music, etc.

Posted 03 February 2011 - 05:00 AM

I believe a certain amount of ignorance is allowed in the case of Americans :spiteful: :poke:


Indeed...
Causam cedare non habet eo




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users