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Question for the male customer (and the tailors)


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#55 Nishijin

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Posted 30 January 2011 - 08:03 AM

Contemporary MTM programs can do many things. They usually have several cuts, for different shapes, plus options to adjust to finer details.
The problem is that you need an experienced tailor to spot what's needed, not just a salesman with a 2 day training program.
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#56 Schneidergott

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Posted 30 January 2011 - 08:35 AM

In the olden days when paper patterns were used some of these mtm companies had patterns for all major shapes and sizes so minor changes could be made. The computer software for making patterns clearly is not up to the task, and looks like a failure. Your company is a waste of time, because it is going backwards, even for mtm.


In the olden days RTW and MTM were almost like bespoke with their canvassed fronts and such (perhaps even better regarding make with their quality controls and production standards). And since they paid more than bespoke tailor shops they attracted a lot of tailoring experts.

What really baffles me is why they did not make the really necessary changes and opted for some minor and pretty meaningless options like collar felt in contrasting colours (not a big fan).
But since the major decisions were made by marketing experts, accountants and a dressmaker who would do or say anything to please her elders, sorry I meant superiors, this result comes as no surprise.
I guess creating a new set of up to date patterns was too expensive (how much does tat cost, BTW ?), but fact is that there are companies out there that offer much more flattering and attractive cuts with less flaws in the making process.

Contemporary MTM programs can do many things. They usually have several cuts, for different shapes, plus options to adjust to finer details.
The problem is that you need an experienced tailor to spot what's needed, not just a salesman with a 2 day training program.


We have a set of patterns for 3 basic set of sizes, regular, stout and corpulent. Even though they can be easily manipulated with quite a few options it's mostly the basic pattern that causes the troubles.
For example, our cut is from the late 80's, some sort of Armani copy (but not soft), with wide shoulders and a roomy waist. Which is fine for men without a tapered waist and a regular, flat chest. The worst part is the deep armhole and the narrow sleeve crown and the drags you get if you try to create a more tapered look. Those companies have a huge advantage here that (still) use the traditional Italian or British (or maybe even an US) draft.

"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

http://www.dressedwell.net/ It's snarky, but fun.


#57 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 30 January 2011 - 08:49 AM

Do they take into consideration that different fabrics and weights require different adjustments to certain measures? i.e. thicker cloths respond better to less ease than lighter ones etc. etc. Or are all the options pretty much shirting fabric?
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#58 Schneidergott

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Posted 30 January 2011 - 04:11 PM

Do they take into consideration that different fabrics and weights require different adjustments to certain measures? i.e. thicker cloths respond better to less ease than lighter ones etc. etc. Or are all the options pretty much shirting fabric?


The majority of the fabrics are in the 7 to 8 oz. range, a few are less (175gr. Loro Piana), a few are more (around 9 oz.) plus some Harris or R&T tweeds.
We still have a few entry level wool-poly blends with Lycra as well.
Usually the fabrics are tested how they respond to steam or heat in general and the pattern is adjusted (for instance the Lycra fabrics are cut slightly larger than the pure wool fabrics) accordingly.

But with big names come big prices and it's yet uncertain how customers will react. I guess we will do great (sales wise) in some areas and cities, while we will suck hard in others where there is less money available to spend on suits or people demand a heavier and more robust fabric quality.
Perhaps it's just me, but I noticed that many customers have shown a more demanding attitude in the last years and it has become harder to satisfy them. I think the often excessive use of the "Ma▀arbeit" term has let them to believe that we actually do offer bespoke, even though our then price range should have a been a clear indication that we didn't.

"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

http://www.dressedwell.net/ It's snarky, but fun.


#59 jukes

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Posted 02 February 2011 - 03:39 AM

Common sense is now called - Health and safety and Political Correctness!



Mansie - Don,t get me started on Health and Safety, most of them would not recognise common sense if they fell over it.
If ever there was a job for people who cant cut it in the real world, its Health and Safety, who try to blind us with figures to justify their position, but in reality accident figures have not fallen as much as they would have you believe, since they have been around.






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