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#19 tailleuse

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Posted 04 January 2012 - 08:00 AM

For us, and me, it seems very strange to say that any bespoke suit would be uncomfortable to wear weather the armhole is cut high or low, as long as it's not too high, and let's not forget to mention; too low.
...

Naturally a tightly fitting coat would put more strain on personal adjustments than a rather baggy and loose coat bought off the rack for comfort but if that's not a challenge that we tailors can meet, then what's the point in even discussing the matter at hand?
...

And let's not forget; sometimes comfort and mobility is not always an absolute value, but something that is in clear relation to what we've learned to get used to and to what we expect.


I don't know why it seems strange. Back then, even if the clothes were couture or bespoke, they were not cut with the comfort of women in mind; they were cut so women could be as decorative as possible, and the women who could afford those clothes were not working 12-hour days. Any woman today wearing hand tailored clothing that she is paying for from her earnings is working very long days. Even the Ladies Who Lunch don't dress as formally as they used to during the day. It's neither comfortable nor practical.

I believe that comfort should be considered a paramount value in the design of women's clothes. Comfort is awfully important to men and I can't think of why women would be any different. People who don't have to wear the clothes should avoid being swept up in an extremely misguided sense of nostalgia. If tailors can't make clothes that are beautiful, functional, durable, and reasonably comfortable, what's the point, especially at today's prices, and with such abundant, lower-priced competition?

When I look at women's clothes, I consider more than aesthetic appeal (and I don't find these outfits appealing. They look awfully dated, and sort of sad, with the need to over-emphasize the woman's femininity.). I look at the cost to the woman in terms of comfort, dignity, self-image, as well as the literal cost of the clothing. Women are not dress-up dolls.

Edited by tailleuse, 04 January 2012 - 02:14 PM.

Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#20 tailleuse

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Posted 04 January 2012 - 08:15 AM

New Look items had a very special foundation: boned bodice plus padded underskirt. in other words: women after the WW2 were all tits and ass again. No wonder Chanel HATED that.


It's a very retro look, retro as in retrogressive. Posted Image

The whole point of the shift dress in the 60s was that a woman could put it on, feel attractive, and go about her day without obsessing about everything she ate. Sure, a thin woman looked better than an overweight one, but no one had to go crazy thinking about her looks. Shifts came in a variety of prices and were very varied.

Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#21 Padme

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Posted 05 January 2012 - 05:01 AM

Tailored clothing should conform to the body more. I think most people are not accustomed to feeling that kind of fit. I read this in a book or one of the boards, but having worn my tailored clothing, I do agree with this.

I looked at the 50's and 60's styles and I could see wearing them realistically. Women who lunched, worked, or had teen girls had help with the housework. It was cheaper to have help back then. We've got day maid services in our town, but I've never used them. I think the ads are mainly marketing an image of what most women would love to imagine themselves living. I've watched old sitcoms of ladies who put on excercise gear to workout in, and then dress for the rest of the day.

I don't work outside my home, but I do a lot of driving and I still have to look fairly decent on drop offs and pick ups. I myself love shift dresses, but would need a jacket or sweater or I would freeze.

What styles besides the shift would you like to see more of Taileuse? Women can cover a lot of ground during the day, and a closet full of shifts would get boring for me.


editing to add website:
Taileuse, the reason I was asking what styles and workclothes is, I was thinking about this girls blog Carolyn's blog

She works long hours, and makes most of her clothing. If you go back through her blog, you will see how she pretty much drafts (using purchased patterns) and morphs anything she pretty much wants.

Edited by Padme, 06 January 2012 - 01:25 AM.


#22 tailleuse

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Posted 14 January 2012 - 05:46 AM

I think the ads are mainly marketing an image of what most women would love to imagine themselves living.


You may be right. I have to say that the image is most unappealing to me. I like images of dynamic, active, professional women who are trim but have more or less natural shapes.

What styles besides the shift would you like to see more of Taileuse? Women can cover a lot of ground during the day, and a closet full of shifts would get boring for me.



It wouldn't get boring for me, because I'm not a fashionista. I like Chanel-style suits (the tapered style, not the boxy style), attractively fitted sheath dresses and good looking pants suits. A few months ago I posted several images of Ralph Lauren tailored styles that I thought were gorgeous but there was no reaction.

editing to add website:
Taileuse, the reason I was asking what styles and workclothes is, I was thinking about this girls blog Carolyn's blog

She works long hours, and makes most of her clothing. If you go back through her blog, you will see how she pretty much drafts (using purchased patterns) and morphs anything she pretty much wants.


I'm familiar with that blog. I don't particularly like the author's taste, and, although I hate to sound cruel, she is so overweight that I simply cannot get inspired by anything she sews. She also has opinions about the design and manufacture of clothes that in my experience are not well-founded.

I also cannot stand blogs that are poorly written. For example, in the current post on that blog, the word should have been to "jibe," not "jive." How difficult is it to remember that the word"it" followed by an s takes an apostrophe when used as a contraction and not when used in the possessive form?

She's also not a "girl." She's at least 48. Females over 18, certainly over 21, are women. At least in public life.

Edited by tailleuse, 14 January 2012 - 10:05 PM.

Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#23 Padme

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Posted 14 January 2012 - 07:52 AM

I didn't see the RL post, but I don't always visit C & T. I think I'm going to try a few new looks before I settle back down to clean and classic. Sometimes it doesn't hurt to be a bit fun loving with a few of the newer styles.

Carolyn and I don't agree on everything, but the way she can manipulate a pattern and have it do what she wants is amazing. I have thought a lot of her looks good looking and well thought out.

#24 tailleuse

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Posted 14 January 2012 - 08:27 AM

I didn't see the RL post, but I don't always visit C & T. I think I'm going to try a few new looks before I settle back down to clean and classic. Sometimes it doesn't hurt to be a bit fun loving with a few of the newer styles.

...


Padme,

Obviously, people have different views. That's why we go on the web to see what others think. I fully admit that I'm not that adventurous when it comes to clothes that I might actually consider making at this point and I personally have zero interest in wasp-waist 40s and 50s styles -- especially 50s "New Look" styles. You know those Irving Penn portraits of his wife, Lisa Fonssagrives, that everyone seems to love so much? I don't care for them. Certainly, that's not a style I would ever emulate, even were it physically possible. I don't like fussiness and extreme artificiality.


If I had an expert pattern maker and sample maker at my disposal and money were no object, my view might be a little different.

I'll see if I can find my Ralph Lauren post. It was high-end ready to wear, but lovely stuff, in my view.

In addition to expressing my personal p.o.v., I like to think I'm providing a reality check for the professionals out there.



Edit: Here are the Ralph Lauren photos I posted (Sept. 25, 2011).

I stand corrected. Sartor and posaune had some interesting comments about the need for darts to achieve the more dramatic silhouettes.

Full disclosure: No one would confuse me with a Ralph Lauren model either. Posted Image But at least the looks for me are aspirational. When I see the other photos, I think, 'Thank God, the 50s are done.'

http://www.cutterand...h=1

Another line I like is Katharine Hooker.

http://katherinehooker.com/jackets/

The quality of the tailoring is nothing you'd post about, but I also like J. Crew. It's a classic sensibility with a modern spin. Unfortunately, most of their clothes are cut for underfed 14-year-olds.

Edited by tailleuse, 14 January 2012 - 10:07 PM.

Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#25 ladhrann

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Posted 30 January 2012 - 10:43 AM


I believe that comfort should be considered a paramount value in the design of women's clothes. Comfort is awfully important to men and I can't think of why women would be any different. People who don't have to wear the clothes should avoid being swept up in an extremely misguided sense of nostalgia. If tailors can't make clothes that are beautiful, functional, durable, and reasonably comfortable, what's the point, especially at today's prices, and with such abundant, lower-priced competition?

When I look at women's clothes, I consider more than aesthetic appeal (and I don't find these outfits appealing. They look awfully dated, and sort of sad, with the need to over-emphasize the woman's femininity.). I look at the cost to the woman in terms of comfort, dignity, self-image, as well as the literal cost of the clothing. Women are not dress-up dolls.



I liked your posts of the RL collection, I liked the tailored jackets and skirts. However when you say women are not dress-up dolls, isn't the greatest threat to proper tailoring dressing the slavish attitude so many women (and men) have to labels and brands? I suppose it may be more obvious in women's clothing as men's regular wear, for want of a better word, tends to a samey shabby mean.


The main female clothing market, seems to me at least to be based around an endless churning of looks or pieces etc., and even the cheapest of this clothing I'm talking about Primark etc. is very expensive, firstly in terms of the human cost, the net economic loss and the sheer waste involved in spending so much money on inferior cloth, and clothes that are made to be worn very few times?

#26 Padme

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Posted 30 January 2012 - 11:27 AM

RL is my favorite lately of what I bought last year, but not too many things. I like JCrew but it's been awhile since I was in the store. It's been difficult for me to reply because I have found I don't get into the stores that easily, and I make a lot of what I wear.

#27 tailleuse

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Posted 31 January 2012 - 08:46 AM

I liked your posts of the RL collection, I liked the tailored jackets and skirts. However when you say women are not dress-up dolls, isn't the greatest threat to proper tailoring dressing the slavish attitude so many women (and men) have to labels and brands?

I hate the way women (some women) will buy things just based on the label. I put up those Ralph Lauren photos only because it's seldom that I see outfit after outfit and think, "That's gorgeous. Beautifully made. Beautifully styled. Aspirational but believable."

I suppose it may be more obvious in women's clothing as men's regular wear, for want of a better word, tends to a samey shabby mean.


The main female clothing market, seems to me at least to be based around an endless churning of looks or pieces etc., and even the cheapest of this clothing I'm talking about Primark etc. is very expensive, firstly in terms of the human cost, the net economic loss and the sheer waste involved in spending so much money on inferior cloth, and clothes that are made to be worn very few times?


I agree. I don't understand why women put up with it. I assume it's a combination of ignorance about good clothing and fit, plus pressure to keep up with trends.



Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#28 tailleuse

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Posted 31 January 2012 - 08:48 AM

RL is my favorite lately of what I bought last year, but not too many things. I like JCrew but it's been awhile since I was in the store. It's been difficult for me to reply because I have found I don't get into the stores that easily, and I make a lot of what I wear.


Padme,

RL was just an example. Handsomely tailored, but wearable. J. Crew isn't the same quality, but I like it: cheerful, whimsical preppy taste.



Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#29 Padme

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Posted 31 January 2012 - 11:07 PM

I'm falling back on what I know. I really need more time to shop alone. I used to.

In the last 2 years, I think I've bought 4 pairs of shoes on sale, and maybe 12 things, all RL, and 2 Coach bags not counting foundation wear. It's just sad.

I have been cleaning out my closet and trying on clothes and a Dorothy Moore skirt I drafted a while back is still my favorite skirt. I was watching my husband draft the presser board and I told him to get ready for me to ask him for drafting help again.



#30 tailleuse

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Posted 01 February 2012 - 02:15 AM

I was watching my husband draft the presser board and I told him to get ready for me to ask him for drafting help again.



What luck to have such a skillful assistant.Posted Image



Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#31 Padme

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Posted 01 February 2012 - 05:15 AM

Thank you. I'm returning the favor with men's flannel shirts, mass amounts of ironing shirts, cooking, cleaning, etc., etc., etc.

#32 tailleuse

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Posted 01 February 2012 - 10:36 PM

Thank you. I'm returning the favor with men's flannel shirts, mass amounts of ironing shirts, cooking, cleaning, etc., etc., etc.


You probably saw that the first video on pressing is up on English Cut. From other threads in this forum I'm under the impression that some people may have mixed feelings about the author, but I appreciate the videos he puts up.



Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#33 Padme

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Posted 03 February 2012 - 07:28 AM

I just saw it today. I only got to watch it once. I'm a little confused on the creases or no creases. He did put them in at the end, but in general are creases good or bad? I will keep reviewing. I want my things too look that nice.

I'm going to set my laptop up by the iron and pause and iron with him. I could see I need some improvement. He used a lot of steam. I mainly do cotton twills.


My presser board is coming along. The wood plugs need to be cut off and the top around the plugs sanded. I also noticed his board had a lot of padding on it, so I may or may not add an extra wool layer.

I have a shoe brush I bought at Target a long time ago for brushing wool. I've only used it on fabrics.

Wasn't he nice to do that?



#34 Nishijin

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Posted 04 February 2012 - 06:12 AM

This is getting far from the original topic...

I've watched Mr Mahon's video tonight, and I must say that I'm far from enthousiast. The way he shows how to press trousers, one will get a lot of shine. He may talk a little about using a press cloth, but he take no care to press the seams in a way to prevent marking the edges of seam allowances. On a navy worsted, doing what he does, you get shine all along the seam, and good luck to remove it if you haven't learned how... Same for pocket bags, by the way, even if he does not press to much in that area.
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#35 tailleuse

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Posted 04 February 2012 - 10:58 AM

This is getting far from the original topic...

I've watched Mr Mahon's video tonight, and I must say that I'm far from enthousiast. The way he shows how to press trousers, one will get a lot of shine. He may talk a little about using a press cloth, but he take no care to press the seams in a way to prevent marking the edges of seam allowances. On a navy worsted, doing what he does, you get shine all along the seam, and good luck to remove it if you haven't learned how... Same for pocket bags, by the way, even if he does not press to much in that area.



I only skimmed it. I was busy and had an audio problem with my computer. I will keep your comments in mind.

Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#36 tailleuse

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Posted 04 February 2012 - 10:59 AM

I just saw it today. I only got to watch it once. I'm a little confused on the creases or no creases. He did put them in at the end, but in general are creases good or bad? I will keep reviewing. I want my things too look that nice.

I'm going to set my laptop up by the iron and pause and iron with him. I could see I need some improvement. He used a lot of steam. I mainly do cotton twills.


My presser board is coming along. The wood plugs need to be cut off and the top around the plugs sanded. I also noticed his board had a lot of padding on it, so I may or may not add an extra wool layer.

I have a shoe brush I bought at Target a long time ago for brushing wool. I've only used it on fabrics.

Wasn't he nice to do that?



I was confused about the creases, too. I think it was nice of him to make the video as well.



Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)





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