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Lilli Ann


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#37 Padme

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Posted 05 February 2012 - 12:00 AM

My husband watched it. I'm sure I will have him looking over my shoulder telling me how to do it.

The part where Mr. Mahon put the towel under the waistband was like a lightbulb. That area is hard to get. I usually have to use the very end of my ironing board or my JoAnns press board which is much smaller and doesn't feel as sturdy as the new one.

#38 SPOOKIETOO

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Posted 29 June 2014 - 10:24 PM

I'm going to pull this posting back up as I think the Lilli Ann designs are quite inspirstional-but for reasons other than the wasp waist. (Also I apologize as I can't post pics from my phone.)

I have collected quite an inventory of Lilli Ann garment pictures over the last couple of years, but more as inspiratin for design details rather than fitting a waist that I will never again possess. For instance the only garment cited here that I chose to archive was the elongated jacket with the shoulder princess seams ending curved into the pocket and the additional detail of the triple lapels. That one style could easily be pulled off today - by a variety of body styles and shapes.

While the other styles cited are excellent examples of 1950's "fit" they are very unrealistic for todays working woman even those that profess to be avid wearers of vintage. There are numerous photos online of women in vintage possessing waists small enough to button the jackets yet no T&A to complete the look and so they too mostly look frumpy.

The true treasure of the Lilli Ann collection is not the 50's styling - its the attention to the design details. After all, the company manufactured from the 40's to the 80's. The 40's fit and styling is much more applicable today as women didn't have money to waste on expensive corsets and due to the war, many were working for the first time.

The inspiration from these garments should be the design details: covered buttons, contrasting insets, pocket trimming, color blocking, a multitude of lapel treatments. I myself will try to replicate a 70's denim Llilian Ann creation that incorporates additional chromed buckles into the collar-less bound neckline - with matching pants a perfect job site ensemble!

To experience an inspirational LilliAnn slide show - Bing -do NOT Google - "Lilli Ann suit photos" and set back, watch the show - and absorb the details. (There will also be the occassional pic of the vintage wearer - not really " pulling it off { a bit sad really}).

Add these details to a realistic fit for todays lifestyle and that would be a reason for bespoke.
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#39 tailleuse

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Posted 01 July 2014 - 11:27 AM



The inspiration from these garments should be the design details: covered buttons, contrasting insets, pocket trimming, color blocking, a multitude of lapel treatments. I myself will try to replicate a 70's denim Llilian Ann creation that incorporates additional chromed buckles into the collar-less bound neckline - with matching pants a perfect job site ensemble!

 

 

That's a good lens to use.


Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#40 Claire Shaeffer

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 12:02 AM

The Costume Institute at the Met (NYC) has a copy of the Dior's Bar. The peplum or skirt on the jacket is well padded--at least 1". Pierre Cardin was the premier in the tailoring atelier when it was made. According to a curator at the V&A (V&A also has a copy), Cardin said that they kept sending him to the chemist to buy more cotton. I'm not sure who "they" were--perhaps Dior and Mme Marguerite.

   The Lilli Ann jackets would have at least 2 layers of stiffening. This was prior to fusibles so they might have been machine quilted together but probably not hand quilted since they were rtw. 

 

When considering the comfort, remember they had no other experiences so they didn't consider the discomfort. Also, women's lives were very different from today and these suits were worn by upper middle class. 


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#41 tailleuse

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 10:18 AM

 

 

When considering the comfort, remember they had no other experiences so they didn't consider the discomfort. Also, women's lives were very different from today and these suits were worn by upper middle class. 

 

I understand that.  Upper class women changed several times a day and everyone dressed for dinner. But I am alarmed when people who seem to have no knowledge of the history of women talk about sacrificing comfort to that kind of style.


Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)





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