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Drafting systems


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#1 Lewis Davies

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Posted 15 February 2011 - 08:11 PM

Now a lothas been said about different drafting systems , there are a lot of systems that are used and there are also a lot of methods to acheive the same result
I think newcomers to this forum would be advised that a draft is just a proportionate system in which is only a quartet of the finished product another 2 quarters goes on fitting which is a big part of the garment and then the final part is construction
So all these
Systems are all trying to do the same thing which is a rough guide
The fit is the most imPortant and I don't think beginners understand that fitting oneself is possibl the hardest thing in the world as you can of see relevant defects and the like. So I thought it was a good idea if I stated this so newcomers don't draft things and then wonder why it isn't perfect (it's not that easy beleive me)
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#2 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 16 February 2011 - 01:43 AM

I use a direct measure system not a proportionate, so I like to think I get a little better initial fit. But you are correct, fit is the important thing and as we have seen by some of the new posters they soon realize a pattern has to be altered quite a bit to get the best shape possible.

Oh and the amount of quarters broken down depend on the cutter, typically it's two quarters making up to make the cutter look good. :poke:
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#3 jukes

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Posted 16 February 2011 - 02:31 AM

Studying posture and attitude is as important as the basic draft, look at certain people when you are out and about, and ask yourself what pattern alterations would be made for that type of posture / attitude.
I like to watch TV shows like Poirot, not the easiest figure to cut for, and yet he wears some very well cut clothes.
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#4 Lewis Davies

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Posted 16 February 2011 - 04:02 AM

Haha well i would say that as
Well bit I thin making beginners undersad that cutting and making are very very different roles
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#5 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 16 February 2011 - 04:19 AM

cutting and making are very very different roles


Yes they are! Any one can hack out a pattern, it takes a talented tailor to make it look good :spiteful:
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#6 Nishijin

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Posted 16 February 2011 - 05:04 AM

Yes they are! Any one can hack out a pattern, it takes a talented tailor to make it look good :spiteful:


Agreed. It takes a decent tailor not to ruin the nice work from a talented cutter. :poke:
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#7 MANSIE WAUCH

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Posted 16 February 2011 - 05:53 AM

Yes they are! Any one can hack out a pattern, it takes a talented tailor to make it look good :spiteful:



How many talented tailors do you know?
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#8 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 16 February 2011 - 05:54 AM

a couple :Whistle:
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#9 MANSIE WAUCH

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Posted 16 February 2011 - 05:57 AM

Studying posture and attitude is as important as the basic draft, look at certain people when you are out and about, and ask yourself what pattern alterations would be made for that type of posture / attitude.
I like to watch TV shows like Poirot, not the easiest figure to cut for, and yet he wears some very well cut clothes.


Quite correct! People don't realise that the proportionate pattern is only a piece of equipment you produce first, then shape and alter according to the measurements obtained and the figure discription given. This is what sets a good cutter apart from a bad cutter.
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#10 MANSIE WAUCH

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Posted 16 February 2011 - 05:59 AM

a couple :Whistle:


Who is the other one? :thumbsup:
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#11 Lewis Davies

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Posted 16 February 2011 - 08:14 AM

I know about 20 good ones and 5-6 incredible ones
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#12 Todd Hudson

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Posted 16 February 2011 - 12:04 PM

So all these
Systems are all trying to do the same thing which is a rough guide
The fit is the most imPortant and I don't think beginners understand that fitting oneself is possibl the hardest thing in the world as you can of see relevant defects and the like. So I thought it was a good idea if I stated this so newcomers don't draft things and then wonder why it isn't perfect (it's not that easy beleive me)


Hear, hear Mr. Davies. Taking measurement, doing math, geometry and drafting is easy for people of all ages. Remembering how to fix the pattern on the spot for every type of figure, knowing the how to instruct the sewing tailor and/or remembering all the steps you will take to execute (or kill!) the coat properly will take up a fair amount of time while your bank account dwindles.
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#13 Jake K

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Posted 16 February 2011 - 01:39 PM

I use a direct measure system not a proportionate, so I like to think I get a little better initial fit. But you are correct, fit is the important thing and as we have seen by some of the new posters they soon realize a pattern has to be altered quite a bit to get the best shape possible.

Oh and the amount of quarters broken down depend on the cutter, typically it's two quarters making up to make the cutter look good. :poke:


I use a direct measure system too. What is rarely mentioned on the forum is when following a proportionate draft you are essentially drafting a block pattern, (generally) to the breast size. This work could be saved by umm, using a block pattern, since you are not inputing any additional data!

In other words, if you're not using a bunch of direct measures in your draft, why are you drafting the same stock size repeatedly?

And I am not falling for your flamebait Jason, I have finally hipped up to your incendiary intent :spiteful:

Besides a real structural engineer (cutter) can use many different contractors (coatmakers), including him or herself if competent. :Whistle:
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#14 jcsprowls

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Posted 16 February 2011 - 01:46 PM

Thanks for taking this one on the nose, Jake.

I agree. If you always start with a proportional draft and leave all fitting until the baste, you're just drafting the same block on-demand. IOW: it's a whole lotta time contributing no value to the process.

There! I'll draw the rest of the heat :-)
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#15 Jake K

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Posted 16 February 2011 - 02:06 PM

Thanks for taking this one on the nose, Jake.

I agree. If you always start with a proportional draft and leave all fitting until the baste, you're just drafting the same block on-demand. IOW: it's a whole lotta time contributing no value to the process.

There! I'll draw the rest of the heat :-)


Whew!! A human shield!! :friends:

You nailed it in one sentence: a proportionate draft pushes all the real work onto the fitting.

(Edit: I'm parroting JC because this point is so critical)

Edited by Jake K, 16 February 2011 - 02:15 PM.

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#16 Jake K

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Posted 16 February 2011 - 02:26 PM

OK, I'm going to push this one step further:

Proportionate systems are a lot like MTM.

In MTM, you take a stock size and put it on the customer, and note alterations to be made to that stock pattern for the stock size. (These are only limited by the sophistication of the alteration library, which in most cases is pretty basic.)

With a proportionate draft, usually to breast measure, you are drafting this stock size from scratch, then throwing it on the customer, basted, to pin similar alterations to the MTM ones you would have pre-diagnosed. Except the tailor doesn't have to worry that they screwed up their initial diagnosis because it's a baste with massive inlays.

To me, this kind of procedure is all about covering the tailor's butt and transferring the risk to the client's time.
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#17 jcsprowls

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Posted 16 February 2011 - 02:36 PM

transferring the risk to the client's time


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Edited by jcsprowls, 16 February 2011 - 02:38 PM.

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#18 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 16 February 2011 - 03:42 PM

Well there is another method of using blocks that I am more familiar with. Yes it starts with a standard block, but then you use a series of short and check measures to get the block "on" before first baste. So it's a bit like direct measures with a little origami.

Which system do you use Jake? is it self varying or do you have to alter your patterns for attitude after the draught?
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