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Great Coat


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#1 occam's razor

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Posted 04 March 2011 - 07:58 AM

Hi Everyone

Following on from my initial topic where people were generous enough with their time to respond and provoke some thought about tailoring, I decided to approach Maurice Sedwell, a Savile Row tailoring firm, to get some garments made up. One garment that I ordered was a military inspired great coat and was fortunate today to pick it up and wear it straight out of the shop. Here are some photos of the great coat at various stages:

Pattern drafting:
Posted Image

Forward fitting:
Posted Image

Finished (ignore the measuring tape!):
Posted Image

I will try and post further photos including the fit, detailing like the quilting on the lining, the back with the centre box pleats and half-belt, double-finished buttonholes, etc. What really impressed me was their willingness to collaborate on the project and take genuine care with every aspect of the fit and design.

- OR
  • Sator and jukes like this

#2 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 04 March 2011 - 08:10 AM

Nice, Maurice is yet another tailor we see little work from.
Silly Cognoscenti, Drape is for windows!

#3 Torry Kratch

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Posted 04 March 2011 - 08:47 AM

Gorgeous coat!

#4 Sator

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Posted 04 March 2011 - 10:57 AM

Superb! Look - he's even cut the Greatcoat with a side body. :frantics:

#5 Sator

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Posted 04 March 2011 - 11:56 AM

BTW here's my one that I cut with minor modifications off a pattern straight from Anthony Sinclair's workshop:

Posted Image

#6 jukes

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Posted 04 March 2011 - 09:11 PM

Fantastic a real artists work, the best of British Posted Image

#7 Torry Kratch

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Posted 05 March 2011 - 12:36 AM

Fantastic a real artists work, the best of British Posted Image

This is also an excellent engineering work! Is not it? :Big Grin:

However, there is the question on the side "waves" in the waist? :shock:

Edited by Torry Kratch, 05 March 2011 - 12:46 AM.


#8 jukes

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Posted 05 March 2011 - 01:15 AM

This is also an excellent engineering work! Is not it? :Big Grin:

However, there is the question on the side "waves" in the waist? :shock:


This is definitely not engineered, engineering is for factories, this is hand made tailoring from an artist, (strange no one refers to Italian tailoring as "engineered") As for the waves, probably the dummy is not the same size as the client.

#9 Torry Kratch

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Posted 05 March 2011 - 01:26 AM

So a joke is not worth an explanation. ;) :hi:

#10 jukes

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Posted 05 March 2011 - 01:30 AM

So a joke is not worth an explanation. ;) :hi:



You got me i didnt see the smilie Posted Image



#11 MANSIE WAUCH

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Posted 05 March 2011 - 03:59 AM

Superb! Look - he's even cut the Greatcoat with a side body. :frantics:


And with two front darts, or was one rubbed out sfterwards?

#12 jukes

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Posted 05 March 2011 - 05:14 AM

And with two front darts, or was one rubbed out sfterwards?



Looking at the amount added to the end of the pocket, its one dart. Probably a bit of "rock of eye" going on to see what looks best.



#13 greger

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Posted 05 March 2011 - 06:56 AM

Can never judge a coat on a dummy.
Two different pictures, maybe two different dummies.

#14 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 05 March 2011 - 07:49 AM

yeah can't wait to see it on the dummy it's intended for :p
Silly Cognoscenti, Drape is for windows!

#15 Sator

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Posted 05 March 2011 - 08:02 AM

I thought it was rubbed out the first time, but on closer inspection it looks like he first separated off the side body, then displaced the overpocket section to create more waist suppression and chest effect. Next, he appears to have turned the front dart into a enlarged fish shaped style of dart, to squeeze a bit more effect out of this dart, but this has the disadvantage of creating more distortion, so he then rubbed half of the front dart out, and divided it into two front darts:

Posted Image

I think the steps to produce it were like this:

Step one:

Posted Image

Step two, enlarge the dart:

Posted Image

Step three, split enlarged dart into two:

Posted Image

The alternative would have been to increase the amount of displacement of the overpocket section, while keeping the actual front dart itself as small as possible. However, this does increase the crookening effect of the overpocket section, and maybe he feels that the double darted front produces less distortion.

The other major feature to note is the presence of a yoke, which is also a very interesting style and construction feature:

Posted Image

The gorge dart has further been displaced from its usual position on this type of coat so it is angled towards the nipple-line, rather than straight down the midline:

Posted Image

Posted Image

The shoulders have a beautiful, though understated concave shape, and the sleeve given a nice bit of rope:

Posted Image

All of this emphasises the military crispness of the coat, which I think is more successfully interpreted and executed than this (somewhat droopy shouldered) example from Anthony Sinclair (Sean Connery's tailor in the 1960s James Bond roles):

Posted Image

The collar is a major pain to get right (it has to be wearable with the fronts open as well as buttoned up), and although I think I managed to improve on Sinclair a bit, the Maurice Sedwell example is probably even better. Also the nice width on the lapels is absolutely perfect. Sinclair's (and hence mine) are probably too narrow.

Also worthy of praise is the fancy sleeve cuff:

Posted Image

When you start to add in construction features like the quilted lining as well, it makes my one cut off Anthony Sinclair's pattern seem a bit simplistic. :sorry: While my main aim was to stick to Sinclair, it makes me wonder if I should have been more adventurous in deviating from him. If I were to ever make this style of coat up again, I certainly will take a leaf out of the Sedwell book.

All in all, a pretty damned impressive tour de force display of superlative cutting skills. :im Not Worthy: Other readers looking for a Savile Row tailor take note!

BTW I am curious to know how the back was finished. Some great coats have pleats in place of the standard centre back vent.

#16 occam's razor

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Posted 05 March 2011 - 11:13 AM

There are some sharp-eyed eagles in this forum! Mr. Taub, who cut the coat at Sedwell, really added the substance to my vague idea of the great coat. I see him not only as a skillful cutter but also a designer ('orrible word, I know). I mean, great coats are quite in vogue this winter in the UK (e.g. Burburry, Gieves & Hawkes, etc) so in some ways, there was the aesthetic challenge of moving beyond the 'RTW' look without being outlandish for the sake of it.

Sator:
- The double dart is indeed a subtle feature of the forepart which I seem to remember being told that Scottish Highland regiment coats have these darts and that the double darts were not necessarily more shaping than a single one (I mistakenly thought it was). The task seemed to be more about keeping the darts neatly parallel with each other.

- The curved yoke was designed to create a fluid line from the where the yoke's bottom seam line up and roll into the sleeves' under-seam. Unfortunately, I'm off on travelling tomorrow but will get a photo of this (plus others) soonish.

- You are certainly right about the collar. Mr. Taub wanted the collar to be clean looking without dragging whether it laid down or stood up. I do recall standing still for quite some time in the fitting room while he cross-checked again and again so that the collar worked both up and down when the coat was sequentially fastened from the second button upwards.

- The cuffs on the sleeves worked out better that I hoped because I originally thought of horizontal turn-back ones. There is a single button fastening beneath the cuff and gives the cuff-end a slightly flared look. Had we found some very burnished brass buttons for the coat then the cuff button would have been showing. As it stands now, I am very pleased with the horn buttons.

- More than anything else about the coat, my eye is forever drawn to the shoulder line when I glance at my reflection. For me, the slight concave shape and roping gives the shoulders a distinguished line.

- I'll post photos of the coat's back. There is a centre box(?) pleat running from the yoke and ending above the half-belt which is placed at the hollow of my back. Below the half-belt is the one-piece centre box pleat.

- Is your great coat a button 5 or button 6? At one point, we were going for a button 6 but eventually decided to drop the last button from the bottom.

Torry Kratch:
- Yes, the final photo does seem to show the left side waving (or do you think it is both?). It not something that I notice when I wear the coat but will reserve judgment until it gets a few more outings. Who knows - if there is a problem then I will ask Sedwell to address it.

One final, almost trivial point being that Sedwell provides hangers worthy of bespoke garments. They are heavy wooden jobbies made by Toscanini with a curved back and the shoulder flares are the equivalent of 70s-style bell-bottoms.

- OR

#17 Sator

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Posted 05 March 2011 - 12:14 PM

I'm looking forward to seeing how the back is made up. BTW when you say that the pleat at the back is once piece, I take it that you mean that it is cut without a centre seam, in one continuous piece?

My coat is a button-five show-five. This is one of the points where I deviated from Sinclair - whose greatcoat, as you can see, is a button-four. I'm actually glad I added the extra button because when caught out in a heavy New York blizzard, I found that closing the bottom button stopped cold wind and snow blowing into the coat.

#18 Sator

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Posted 05 March 2011 - 01:17 PM

Mr. Taub, who cut the coat at Sedwell, really added the substance to my vague idea of the great coat. I see him not only as a skillful cutter but also a designer ('orrible word, I know).


BTW "designer" is traditionally just another word for a "cutter". This is the original, and "real" meaning of the term. The corruption of the word to mean a cartoonist for the RTW industry probably came from the fact that the chief designer/cutter traditionally might draw a cartoon to be realised under supervision into a working draft by the junior cutters. Then someone came up with the idea that you could become the chief cutter without working your way up the ranks from apprentice, tailor, through to cutter over five to ten years - all you have to do was learn to draw cartoons! These types are really more like fashion stylists rather than real "designers".

It's kind of sad, as though you had cuisine designers (who can only cook scrambled eggs on toast) who draw cartoons of a fancy dish which are handed to the cook to be realised into a dish. Instead of the cook getting the credit for making the dish tasty, the "haute cuisine designer" gets all the credit for being some "genius".




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