Jump to content


Photo

Jeans


  • Please log in to reply
43 replies to this topic

#1 Sator

Sator

    Administrator

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,998 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sydney, Australia

Posted 15 April 2011 - 09:45 AM

This another draft by A.G. Chaudhry for The Tailor & Cutter.

Although these are not traditionally considered a tailor's garment, there is no real reason why a tailor can't make bespoke jeans. A while back A TAILOR our resident sprightly octogenarian from Chicago mentioned that he had cut jeans using his favoured system - Stone's. So if it good enough for him, it is good enough for the younger ones here. There are a lot of poorly cut and horribly fitting jeans being worn these days, and fit is everything when it comes to style.

Sourcing fabric is trickier. If you have the H&S books, you can easily source corduroy. I think the Scabal books even had some corduroy with cashmere in it (IIRC). Some of the most coveted denim comes from Japan - it you can find an agent, it would certainly be worthwhile offering some high end exotic denim to your clients.

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

#2 Torry Kratch

Torry Kratch

    Apprentice

  • Senior Apprentice
  • PipPip
  • 320 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 15 April 2011 - 10:35 AM

Oh! if I may show my experimentation on the denim theme (although things are photographed after the term of their service, so to speak for memory).

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Jeans --- it is a very serious issue, although at first glance it seems that make them easy.
If you do not take into account the fact that for sewing jeans need a special double-needle machine. Anyway, for a tailor-individualist need to examine the canons and the proportion of firms founders.
  • yaojunye likes this

#3 greger

greger

    Master

  • Senior Professional
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,122 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Washington, USA

Posted 15 April 2011 - 12:40 PM

Those are nice denim clothes Torry. Some nice designs there.

Never seen Jean pocket, front and hip, with directions of size and placement. Some of the rtw the front pockets are terrible. Get the hand in but good luck on getting them out. Some rtw is much better than others.
Another style of front pocket is the Western. There are some other names for it too. Two books I know of have directions for making, and each book is a bit different. Cabrerar's book and Hostek's trousers book.

Edited by greger, 15 April 2011 - 12:45 PM.


#4 Nishijin

Nishijin

    Master

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,704 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Paris, France.
  • Interests:Mainly tailoring it seems, but my friends know better...

Posted 16 April 2011 - 01:33 AM

There is very nice heavy corduroy and moleskine from Dugdale, too. Dormeuil has a book with coton and cashmere corduroy.

Denim is hell to source for a tailor. It's a low cost fabric, sold in bug quantities. Plus denim is bought raw, while in RTW there is a lot of finishing after the making (sanding...). Now the fashion is for raw denim, so it's good for us. But it won't last forever.

Classic jeans need a 2 needle machine. But tailor's jeans can be made with a single needle machine, the style is a tad different. You need extensions, though, and a strong machine as denim is quite heavy. I'm still thinking about the buttonholes.

Designer jeans are good for us : we can see many many many styles, different from the classics codes. So tailors can jump in the market, even if they don't have the equipement and knowledge to make a Levis 501.
http://www.paulgrassart.com

Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society.
Mark Twain

#5 Sator

Sator

    Administrator

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,998 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sydney, Australia

Posted 16 April 2011 - 04:39 PM

I remember a few years back Dior (IIRC) were offering Japanese made jeans for over $1000 a pair. I believe some of the Japanese weavers have brought up vintage looms and are making some of the more expensive denims on the market today. The only big question is how to access this market if you are buying cut lengths. I wish some of the traditional cloth merchants who sell to tailors such as H&S would offer high-end Japanese or Italian (?) selvedged denim.

Here is one SF thread talking about buying your own selvedge denim:

http://www.styleforu...ead.php?t=41798

The links provided include this:

http://www.cotton-f.com/page/d03.htm

http://shuttleloomdenim.bigcartel.com/

Unfortunately I can't get this link to work:

http://www.thefabric...ge_denim_fabric

#6 posaune

posaune

    Pro

  • Super Pro
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 956 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Germany

Posted 17 April 2011 - 12:52 AM

http://www.lycra.com...age.aspx?id=327
Example:
78 % cotton and 22 % T 400
Bindung: Köper
Breite: 144 cm
Gewicht: 355 g / m²; 510 g / m
Ausrüstung: gefärbt, sanforisiert d
Pflegehinweis:
washable 60°, no dry tumbling

Besonderheiten: kein Ausbeulen, knitterfrei, schnelltrocknend
no bulging, wrinkle free, quick drying


this is a nice fabric for custom made jeans in my opinion.

lg
posaune

#7 A TAILOR

A TAILOR

    Apprentice

  • Professional
  • PipPip
  • 291 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:metro chicago

Posted 22 April 2011 - 12:03 PM

A CHANGE TO THE JEAN YOKE

in the past when purchasing jeans i always had to take in the waist.
to do this i always removed the waist band and inserted a dart in the yoke.
now that i am retired, decided that i could make my own jeans.
taking apart old ones to make a pattern did not do what i wanted.
so using my trouser pattern converted it to a jean just like the above draft.
but still the seat did not fit very well.
this change did just what i wanted it to do.
you might give this a try,
cut 4 slits for a medium size or 5 slits for a large size, as you see in the picture.
close each slit a bit at the waist pivoting at the bottom.
until the new curved waist line measures as it would be if you had sewn the dart closed.
now you will have to sew the curved seam to a straight seam.
in my opinion it gives a much better fit than a flat yoke.


Posted Image

Edited by A TAILOR, 23 April 2011 - 12:12 PM.

  • jeffrey2117 likes this

#8 Sator

Sator

    Administrator

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,998 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sydney, Australia

Posted 22 April 2011 - 01:11 PM

now that i am retired, decided that i could make my own jeans.
taking apart old ones to make a pattern did not do what i wanted.


I have heard that a lot of industry cutting involves everyone copying everyone else's mistakes by ripping down their rival's garments and copying them. A bit of systematic thought and application should enable a good cutter to draft something much sharper looking than anything in even the most expensive boutique stores. Plus it will be much more exclusive.

#9 A TAILOR

A TAILOR

    Apprentice

  • Professional
  • PipPip
  • 291 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:metro chicago

Posted 24 April 2011 - 04:33 AM

I have heard that a lot of industry cutting involves everyone copying everyone else's mistakes by ripping down their rival's garments and copying them. A bit of systematic thought and application should enable a good cutter to draft something much sharper looking than anything in even the most expensive boutique stores. Plus it will be much more exclusive.


a favorite trick is to rip down a plaid garment. then press all vertical and horizontal stripes in straight lines.
that removes all the distortions.

#10 WolfvsGoat

WolfvsGoat

    Umsie

  • Senior Apprentice
  • Pip
  • 11 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 29 April 2011 - 02:53 PM

This is a thread I can help in for sure.
Buying cut length in denim is not a good idea. You pay WAY to much. People in the industry can piggy back off other orders or by sample yardage. Sample yardage can be anything
under 50yards.

The whole vintage loom thing is a marketing idea. It's not true. The Japanese, Italians, and U.S. all have different ways of looming quality denim.
The only thing that holds true is that narrow with goods cost more.

I have a ton of great denim sources if anyone wants them.

#11 A TAILOR

A TAILOR

    Apprentice

  • Professional
  • PipPip
  • 291 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:metro chicago

Posted 05 May 2011 - 02:58 PM

hi wg

"selvage" denim is what i have been looking for.
do you have sources for these that sell in small cuts? 50 yards would last me three life times.
have you a suggestion on allowances for shrinkage.

#12 WolfvsGoat

WolfvsGoat

    Umsie

  • Senior Apprentice
  • Pip
  • 11 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 02 June 2011 - 10:04 PM

50 yards is "sample yardage" I received an email from a nice young man. I am more than happy to give my contacts names.
Why do you "need" selvage?

Denim is getting expensive because of the cotton situation. You might be able to find a jobber that sales quality denim is smalls rolls.


Best,
Mauro


Shrinkage-
Do a wash test. get a 12x12 square and measure it. Then give it a wash ( to your specifications) and measure it again for shrinkage.

Did you want to use sanforized or unsanforized fabric??

Edited by WolfvsGoat, 02 June 2011 - 10:07 PM.


#13 R.m.Bakker

R.m.Bakker

    Umsie

  • Super Pro
  • Pip
  • 54 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Rotterdam
  • Interests:Bespoke Tailoring, Patternmaking, Shirtmaking.

Posted 03 June 2011 - 02:03 AM

Wow a great find. I had been looking for a jeans pattern for a while now.

In holland among what I call "clothing enthousiasts", something like the iGent folk found on the internet very often albeit a bit more "civilized" in their approach to tailoring, the "denim shirt" and especially the Raw Denim shirt has come to be quite the rage here.

the thing with raw denim is that as the name implies, it's raw ie it has not been washed at all. This means the dye is still on the cloth quite heavily and working with it you will end up having blue hands and a blue ironing board :)

The trick is, or well the rage is now to wash the shirt several times using bleach, and making sure the cloth is quite wrinkled when doing so and in the process is being turned all the time. This creates the same effect has "worn" jeans have, ie the accents on the belt loops for example.

I have been commissioned to do one of these shirts, I have some pictures : (This is all (except for the last picture) before washing, I am working on it as we speak)

Posted Image

Yes, I hand-fell all these things :)

Posted Image

Shoulder detail; under-yoke is hand-felled, sleeve seam allowances also hand-felled, and the sleeve is "shirred" as per request of the customer (iGents......... :hmm:)

Posted Image

Sleeve Detail; I have hand-topstitched the placket with buttonhole thread. Note the hand-felled under-arm seam. Buttons/Buttonholes have not been added yet as washing with bleach gave me the creeps with genuine MoP buttons! :) The sleeve is also "shirred into" the cuffs, a detail I always use instead of normal pleats.

Posted Image

Here you see my hands all discolored from the indigo dye.

Posted Image

And here was a sample washed with bleach; note the discoloring of the cloth.


All in all great fun to work with and this is, in my opinion one of these things we as tailors can distinguish ourselves in.

Oh and please note, all this white thread instead of ton-sur-ton is also per the customers request :)

On another note this "dummy" is a dummy made with an old t-shirt and duct tape on my own body. Therefore the shoulder is quite weird-looking in one of these pictures as my own shoulders are quite different from my client's :)

Edited by R.m.Bakker, 03 June 2011 - 02:05 AM.

Owner at Tailored.

Experienced Bespoke Tailor, Bespoke Shirtmaker.

Check out my blog, and business, at:

 

http://www.rubenbakker.nl


#14 A TAILOR

A TAILOR

    Apprentice

  • Professional
  • PipPip
  • 291 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:metro chicago

Posted 03 June 2011 - 03:53 AM

I have heard that a lot of industry cutting involves everyone copying everyone else's mistakes by ripping down their rival's garments and copying them. A bit of systematic thought and application should enable a good cutter to draft something much sharper looking than anything in even the most expensive boutique stores. Plus it will be much more exclusive.


you are right sator. my own pattern worked the way i wanted.
the real bonus was that a couple of women complemented me on how nice my jeans fitted.
i guess its true that women like to see a man with a nice butt.
the curved yoke works wonders.

#15 greger

greger

    Master

  • Senior Professional
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,122 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Washington, USA

Posted 03 June 2011 - 09:17 AM

R.M.B,

What are you using for button hole twist? The silk I have used does not work well with home washing in machine and dryer.
I tend to believe a cotton thread would work better, but I'm not sure which thread to use.

#16 Kevin Koch

Kevin Koch

    Apprentice

  • Super Pro
  • PipPip
  • 166 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Goshen, Indiana, USA

Posted 03 June 2011 - 11:05 AM

As it happens, I am making a pair of custom jeans for a wedding this summer. The bride has requested that her groom wear navy blue jeans with orange thread to match her flowers and the dress will have some denim and orange trimming as well. If you just want some for small projects, the 100% cotton denim I am using, currently only $7.98 yd. (!), is from a local company in the town where I lived as a wee lad (info below). They make Amish broadfall jeans, but they also sell yardage, both 11 oz. and 14 oz. They do a lot of mail order because of the Amish. I used the denim a couple time many years ago and liked it back then. I haven't done jeans for a long time now, so I'll let you know how it comes out...

Gohn Bros.
Box 1110
Middlebury, Indiana 46540

1-800-595-0031
1-574-825-2400
Kevin A. Koch
Koch House of Design

#17 R.m.Bakker

R.m.Bakker

    Umsie

  • Super Pro
  • Pip
  • 54 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Rotterdam
  • Interests:Bespoke Tailoring, Patternmaking, Shirtmaking.

Posted 03 June 2011 - 03:18 PM

R.M.B,

What are you using for button hole twist? The silk I have used does not work well with home washing in machine and dryer.
I tend to believe a cotton thread would work better, but I'm not sure which thread to use.


Greger,

As it happens this customer wanted a thicker buttonhole so I used a rather thick, polyester thread, not really buttonhole thread at all. It's from Gutermann and I really don't know what it is exactly. It holds up very well in washing though.

Normally I would use any thread suitable for buttonholing; as long as it's not fuzzy and it has a certain strength to it I'll use it. I then choose which one according to how thick I want the buttonhole to be/which look I want to give it. Even though I live in a country next to Gutermann, spools of real quality buttonholing are impossible to find. And if you want to order theres a huge minimum order quantity, sucks.

Owner at Tailored.

Experienced Bespoke Tailor, Bespoke Shirtmaker.

Check out my blog, and business, at:

 

http://www.rubenbakker.nl


#18 A TAILOR

A TAILOR

    Apprentice

  • Professional
  • PipPip
  • 291 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:metro chicago

Posted 28 June 2011 - 09:00 AM

greg

on jeans i have been using cotton button thread for buttonholes. i double it and wax it.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users