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#19 Terri

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Posted 07 October 2011 - 11:39 PM

I am going to go through this draft on my blog in case anyone is interested.
I think there are a few odd things in this draft.
Has anyone else actually drafted it up? If you have, did you cut a pair to see how it worked?

#20 jukes

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Posted 08 October 2011 - 02:16 AM

I am going to go through this draft on my blog in case anyone is interested.
I think there are a few odd things in this draft.
Has anyone else actually drafted it up? If you have, did you cut a pair to see how it worked?


Never tried this draft but the seat angle looks a tad straight for jeans, another trick is to open the legs a little (as if for bow legged) like the 501s.
Pockets and back yoke should be "laid on" after the pattern is cut, to get a feel of what works, nearly every jean pattern i have seen printed ends up with pockets that don't work, ie too big or small, wrong position etc.
Be interesting to see how it works out.

#21 Terri

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Posted 08 October 2011 - 06:19 AM

I agree with you Jukes on all counts.
What do you think about the 8 inch waist to hip ratio?
Maybe it is a typo?
I have some other concerns as well but we'll see how it goes.

#22 jukes

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Posted 08 October 2011 - 04:35 PM

32" waist - 40" hips is ok for an athletic figure, the side seams at the hip will take a little more curve on jeans.
The waist - hip difference on a woman would be the same, sometimes more.

Edited by jukes, 08 October 2011 - 04:42 PM.


#23 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 15 October 2011 - 09:36 AM

I agree with you Jukes on all counts.
What do you think about the 8 inch waist to hip ratio?
Maybe it is a typo?
I have some other concerns as well but we'll see how it goes.


6.3 inch difference is the most I have seen so far and very juvenile.
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#24 jukes

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Posted 17 October 2011 - 02:20 AM

Terri has put this draft on her blog http://atailormadeit.blogspot.com/.
The tightness on the hips is not good especially using denim which, even though is mostly pre shrunk, it will still shrink further when washed. Maybe this is an error to make the draft look ok with an 8" difference between waist and hips, although it should not be a problem.
The way the seat angle is calculated is strange using a quarter of the waist to find point 18, which gives too straight an angle, especially for jeans.

#25 Terri

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Posted 17 October 2011 - 04:03 AM

The other thing thing that I noticed right away is that there is no dart for shaping in the back, or indication of moving shaping for the seat into the yoke seam for instance.
With an 8 inch difference I expected something. There is no ease at all over the hip so there may be less fabric to get rid of at the waist, but if the measurements indicate a full seat, it isn't just a matter of taking it out in the side seam. There is 1/2 inch in the back waist that could be eased in for seat shaping I guess.

I think the draft poses some problems, and I wanted to explore them.
The best thing would be to make a pair up to see how or if it works, but for the moment, I am too busy with paying work.
I'll continue when I have time.

#26 greger

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Posted 24 October 2011 - 05:21 AM

The dart can be part of the back seam and the way you cut the bottom of the yoke-a curve going up towads the center, like in the addition for belt trousers changinging for suppenders as seen in 1949 mtoc.

Somebody posted a German pdf of many types of clothes- it had a jeans cut within it.


My own jeans method is to take my favorite trouser pattern system and adapting it for the jeans style. But it is good to see what others have done and keep up with modern adaptions.

#27 trovatore

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Posted 29 October 2011 - 08:30 AM

I just made up a pair using this draft. I used my own measurments for the waist and seat, so the drop used in the draft wasn't an issue. However, the back seat is pretty straight, as has already been commented on. I added an inch and a half to the center back seam. The curve in the back yoke gave just the right amount of ease in the seat. All in all, pretty successful; they look like jeans.

#28 Terri

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Posted 29 October 2011 - 10:40 AM

I added an inch and a half to the center back seam

I assume that was added length, extending the CB seam?

#29 jukes

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Posted 29 October 2011 - 05:39 PM

I assume that was added length, extending the CB seam?


I would guess that Travatore opened the seat 1 1/2" more, Too much height on the seat seam will make them look like trousers.

#30 trovatore

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Posted 29 October 2011 - 10:40 PM

I would guess that Travatore opened the seat 1 1/2" more, Too much height on the seat seam will make them look like trousers.


No, I actually added the length to the CB seam - which only brought the waist up to the horizontal level.
Luckily, this was easy to do just by recutting the yoke, and the shape of the yoke didn't suffer any because of it, in my opinion.

I should note that this pattern is clearly meant for a male figure, and would certainly need a lot of tweaking for a female model.

#31 trovatore

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Posted 29 October 2011 - 10:56 PM

Also - Terri, you mentioned the lack of shaping in the seat area. Even though the yoke seam only has an eighth inch added on each side, you'd be surprised at how much shape this imparts to that area! Plus,changing the yoke into a curved shape has already been mentioned above. This could take care of any possible ratio of waist to seat measurement.

One more note; this draft makes up into a "classic" jeans cut. Not extremely snug, and much looser than women would find fashionable today. In America, we call these "Dad" jeans.

I'm interested to hear about anyone else's attempts at this pattern!

#32 jukes

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Posted 30 October 2011 - 01:31 AM

No, I actually added the length to the CB seam - which only brought the waist up to the horizontal level.
Luckily, this was easy to do just by recutting the yoke, and the shape of the yoke didn't suffer any because of it, in my opinion.

I should note that this pattern is clearly meant for a male figure, and would certainly need a lot of tweaking for a female model.


WIth the tightness across the hips and the straight seat angle i am surprised they turned out like "old mens jeans" i had imagined these to turn out like tight girls jeans across the back.

#33 Terri

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Posted 30 October 2011 - 04:20 AM

In the pattern I made, the intersection of CB line and waist line was not trued to a ninety degree angle and I guessed that length would be needed. My pattern had ease at the back waistline which if eased in or darted out would give shaping for the seat.

#34 greger

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Posted 30 October 2011 - 06:25 PM

...CB line and waist line was not trued to a ninety degree angle... Not sure any of my rousers are cut with a ninety degree angle. Finding the correct height of CB and angle of sideseam pluse length across the back does not add up to ninety degree angle very often. Of the three the one changed the least is length across the back, so the others are changed according to need. Other changes can happen too, that can effect the angle, such as a longer/shorter fork or hollowed out seat, to name a couple. Stretching and shrinking are a couple of more reasons. In fitting sometimes there is more ways to skin a cat. And wondering which is the best.

#35 Terri

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Posted 30 October 2011 - 09:54 PM

Well, I have found a problem with many drafts for jeans and modern trousers, that if you don't correct the angle, then go ahead and sew the waistband on, there is an inverted vee formed at the back waist, and it will not sit well on the body.
Sometimes the waistline needs correction, but mostly I have found that extra length is missing on the cb line. Otherwise the back waist sits lower than the front as well as being uncomfortable.

#36 trovatore

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Posted 30 October 2011 - 11:20 PM

[quote name='Terri' timestamp='1319975683' post='26060']
Sometimes the waistline needs correction, but mostly I have found that extra length is missing on the cb line. Otherwise the back waist sits lower than the front

I agree with you Terri. The CB seam should be as close to a right angle as is possible. Sometimes a slight obtuse angle might be neccessary, but there really should be a way to avoid it.

Isn't it the same principle as the CB seam on the coat? It should be a right angle at the collar for all the same reasons. There might be exceptions, but that would be pretty unusual.




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