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A Big "Meh" for Kate Middleton's Wedding Dress


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#19 tailleuse

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Posted 06 February 2012 - 06:26 AM

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When I saw Kate's dress last year it reminded me of the bodice style from the Princess Grace of Monaco dress.


I think most people made that connection. I don't like Princess Grace's wedding dress. Speaking of another famous 50s-era wedding gown, I don't like Jacqueline Bouvier's wedding dress either.

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Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#20 Ciseaux

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Posted 12 February 2012 - 08:59 AM

Speaking of another famous 50s-era wedding gown, I don't like Jacqueline Bouvier's wedding dress either.


Same here tailleuse. That skirt is taking over the entire outfit.

#21 Padme

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Posted 14 February 2012 - 01:26 AM

She hated it too. The dress was her mother's idea.

#22 tailleuse

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 02:39 AM

She hated it too. The dress was her mother's idea.


Really? I didn't know that. Thanks.



Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#23 tailleuse

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 02:41 AM

Same here tailleuse. That skirt is taking over the entire outfit.


Posted Image Yay! Sometimes I feel as if I'm a member of a tiny minority of women who don't like most of 1950s fashion.




Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#24 ladhrann

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Posted 01 June 2012 - 05:02 PM

Posted Image Yay! Sometimes I feel as if I'm a member of a tiny minority of women who don't like most of 1950s fashion.






I'd agree with you all, I think the dress looks rather marmish and ot cool Britannia at all. To my eye the couple always dress like what they are two over-privileged professionals, like a sort of boring lawyer couple. Middleton would have set a far more forward tone by wearing her sister's dress in my opinion.

#25 tailleuse

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Posted 02 June 2012 - 06:36 AM

I'd agree with you all, I think the dress looks rather marmish and ot cool Britannia at all. To my eye the couple always dress like what they are two over-privileged professionals, like a sort of boring lawyer couple. Middleton would have set a far more forward tone by wearing her sister's dress in my opinion.


I preferred Pippa's dress as well. I can understand why MIddleton would have made a conservative choice. There was a lot riding on it, even though the whole thing is silly. But I don't see why I have to say I liked it.


The weirdest misstep was those weird hats by Philip Treacy. I used to think he was brilliant. There was a gorgeous photo of Isabella Blow in one of his hats that used to get reprinted all the time. Those hats reminded me of the original costumes for an early Balanchine ballet that were hideous.

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Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#26 ladhrann

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Posted 02 June 2012 - 06:05 PM

I preferred Pippa's dress as well. I can understand why MIddleton would have made a conservative choice. There was a lot riding on it, even though the whole thing is silly. But I don't see why I have to say I liked it.


The weirdest misstep was those weird hats by Philip Treacy. I used to think he was brilliant. There was a gorgeous photo of Isabella Blow in one of his hats that used to get reprinted all the time. Those hats reminded me of the original costumes for an early Balanchine ballet that were hideous.



I'd always be inclined to support Philip Treacy as a fellow Irishman as well as Galwayman, but there is little to recommend about that hat in my view. In general there is way too much matchey matchey in that outfit in terms of colour, a common flaw of a lot of outfits in my view. That being said you never know what he was asked to do, given that a lot of famous individuals rely on quirks or oddities to remain famous maybe its deliberate? Like going on celebrity big brother, although this is a far more upmarket version.

#27 tailleuse

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Posted 07 June 2012 - 12:23 PM

I'd always be inclined to support Philip Treacy as a fellow Irishman as well as Galwayman, but there is little to recommend about that hat in my view. In general there is way too much matchey matchey in that outfit in terms of colour, a common flaw of a lot of outfits in my view. That being said you never know what he was asked to do, given that a lot of famous individuals rely on quirks or oddities to remain famous maybe its deliberate? Like going on celebrity big brother, although this is a far more upmarket version.


In an interview he said something about wanting to create a unique experience. It was unique. You're right about not knowing what the client's preferences were, but It's hard to believe a 20-year-old woman would come up with an idea like that.

As you said, the whole outfit is matchy matchy, and I don't like the detail on the yoke.

Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#28 Urban

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Posted 08 April 2013 - 03:31 PM

Hi, concerning Kate's dress, i'm really interested about this technique.
Is anyone familiar with this technique of "appliqué" over a tulle?
First, I was wondering if this is a silk tulle and also what kind of hand stitch is suitable for this work...in my research they are talking about a "point de Paris".
source: http://www.artdutric...plications.html

Is this hand stitch discrete enough for a thin flower stem? I did my own test with a simple backstitch, but i think that the problem the stitch has to cover the edge of the lace pattern in order to get a clean border...backstitching doesn't do the job correctly right? or maybe that depend of the kind of lace you use.
I have a project to put some Chantilly lace on tulle and peau de soie and i'm a bit confused about what kind of hand stitch i can use...any idea?

#29 Urban

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Posted 30 May 2013 - 03:23 PM

I've finally answered my question by myself.

first of all the bodice is a silk net with appliquéd lace...so the first step was to find some silk tulle.

source: http://en.wikipedia...._Kate_Middleton

And for the technique they are talking about a carrickmacross inspired technique. And for that the excellent blog of Lyn's Warner (Lyn's needlecase) was inspirational:  http://needlecase.bl...ickmacross.html

Of course that can't be a regular carrickmacross technique (the embroidery is not done on a flat piece of tulle AND the flower patterns are already existing)

but this give a nice idea of how to make an appliqué of chantilly on a silk net.



So what you need is just some chantilly lace, a silk net and a lot of patience.



#30 DanMartin

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Posted 25 September 2013 - 02:24 AM


Ciseaux, on 05 Feb 2012 - 11:14 PM, said:
Posted Image

When I saw Kate's dress last year it reminded me of the bodice style from the Princess Grace of Monaco dress.


Wow. It's uncanny. Although I suppose with Such a conservative fete as a royal wedding, one's options as far as style maybe quite limited or led in a particular direciton. I'm therefore only half surprised at the resemblance.

 

Edited by DanMartin, 25 September 2013 - 02:25 AM.

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#31 tailleuse

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Posted 25 September 2013 - 09:28 PM

Ciseaux, on 05 Feb 2012 - 11:14 PM, said:
Posted Image

When I saw Kate's dress last year it reminded me of the bodice style from the Princess Grace of Monaco dress.


Wow. It's uncanny. Although I suppose with Such a conservative fete as a royal wedding, one's options as far as style maybe quite limited or led in a particular direciton. I'm therefore only half surprised at the resemblance.

 

 

 

I didn't like Grace Kelly's wedding dress.  I also didn't like Jackie Kennedy's wedding dress.

 

o-JACKIE-KENNEDY-WEDDING-DRESS-570.jpg?5

 

 

 Do I dislike 50s wedding dresses?  High Society Wedding dresses?


Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#32 Bonnie

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Posted 01 October 2013 - 09:32 AM

 I don't think it was too much money at all for all of the work they did on it. I also  loved the way it resembled Princes Grace's dress. 

 

 



 

 

 


#33 ladhrann

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Posted 03 October 2013 - 10:59 AM

 

 

I didn't like Grace Kelly's wedding dress.  I also didn't like Jackie Kennedy's wedding dress.

 

o-JACKIE-KENNEDY-WEDDING-DRESS-570.jpg?5

 

 

 Do I dislike 50s wedding dresses?  High Society Wedding dresses?

 

 

I'm not a fan of the meringue either.  And of course there's a whole historical and cultural history behind the garment.  My own grandmothers for instance got married in what was called a travelling suit, a jacket and pencil skirt in the regular shades, spending that kind of effort on a garment that would only be worn once would have been an unimagineable expense at the time [1940s].  Which of course is why it was so favoured by the upper classes and then made its way down the social ladder.


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#34 tailleuse

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Posted 12 October 2013 - 09:51 AM

 

 

I'm not a fan of the meringue either.  And of course there's a whole historical and cultural history behind the garment.  My own grandmothers for instance got married in what was called a travelling suit, a jacket and pencil skirt in the regular shades, spending that kind of effort on a garment that would only be worn once would have been an unimagineable expense at the time [1940s].  Which of course is why it was so favoured by the upper classes and then made its way down the social ladder.

 

The waste is ridiculous, although as you said,  it was a mark of class status.  On Jackie's dress in particular, I hate those large rosettes, or whatever you'd call that embellishment.  I really don't like most 50s styles.


Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#35 Kimberly

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Posted 25 February 2015 - 12:58 AM

She hated it too. The dress was her mother's idea.


i had always read that jacqueline deferred to her husband's choice for the wedding dress. here is a posting from wikipedia:
"The dress was very traditional with the huge bouffant skirt. This invited a remark that “the dress wore Jackie, not the other way round." The design was in deference to the wishes of the Kennedy family, even though the bride's own wish was for a simple dress with firm lines that would have complimented her tall slim figure.[8] Despite the acclaim for the dress around the world, Jacqueline later admitted to friends that she didn't like her wedding dress, because it accentuated her flat chest.[5] She was critical of the dress and also said that it looked "like a lampshade."[9]"

the wedding dress was nothing like anything jacqueline kennedy ever wore. i imagine it is impossible to know the entire story.
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#36 tailleuse

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Posted 25 February 2015 - 01:03 AM

i had always read that jacqueline deferred to her husband's choice for the wedding dress. here is a posting from wikipedia:
"The dress was very traditional with the huge bouffant skirt. This invited a remark that “the dress wore Jackie, not the other way round." The design was in deference to the wishes of the Kennedy family, even though the bride's own wish was for a simple dress with firm lines that would have complimented her tall slim figure.[8] Despite the acclaim for the dress around the world, Jacqueline later admitted to friends that she didn't like her wedding dress, because it accentuated her flat chest.[5] She was critical of the dress and also said that it looked "like a lampshade."[9]"

the wedding dress was nothing like anything jacqueline kennedy ever wore. i imagine it is impossible to know the entire story.

 

A more streamlined, more minimalized dress does seem more like her style, doesn't it? Although as you say, we'll never know.


Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)





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