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How to Practice Hand Sewing Stitches


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#19 tailleuse

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Posted 10 May 2011 - 04:57 AM

Tailleuse -I've never heard this before. Someone gave me a magazine article and it recommended holding the needle as close to the eye as possible. This was supposed to provide more control; more leverage, I think.

Thank you. I will definitely try to get this down. I knew there had to be a trick. Eyeballing alone wasn't doing it for me.



Be careful you don't have your eye out! :rolleyes:



Posted Image But seriously, someone gave me a special issue magazine published by the Threads magazine publishing company that had articles for beginners. It suggested holding the needle at the very end. What is that, sabotage?

I've encountered a fair amount of misinformation and hiding the ball in my sewing education. Just tell me in precise detail what I should do and I will attempt it. Don't tell me to "eyeball it" and that things will gradually improve. Posted Image Maybe some of these folks honestly didn't know that there were ways of communicating these tricks.Posted Image I'll have to give them the benefit of the doubt.


It's too bad I'll never be a sewing teacher. I know all the idiots' questions. If it can be sewn inside out or upside down or in some theretofore inconceivable way I will do it. Posted Image

Edited by tailleuse, 10 May 2011 - 05:04 AM.

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#20 tailleuse

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Posted 10 May 2011 - 05:24 AM

@ Tailleuse

I have seen how seamstresses, tailors, home-sewers and complete noobies hold the thimble and needle. And of this lot the tailor's method is the most ergonomic and economical in movements.


I also prefer having some air on finger. The dressmaker's thimble gets very hot.

BTW, I'm usually one of the few people using a thimble. Even among people with experience. Fortunately, the first teacher I had when I started taking classes said that you could damage your fingers if you didn't use one. I take advice like that very seriously.

.

So for your sake here is some more oral transmissions that are not in books.


THANK YOU.

1. When you set the needle into the thimble and it is primed to bit the cloth notice these points:

A. The fingers are equally on either side of the needle shaft and held just tight enough to have command over the needle. If your thumb starts to tense or cramp you are holding the needle to tight.
B. The thimble is the base, this is the mechanism which you use to advance the needle. Also take note that you have formed a triangle with the fingers and the thimble. This gives you control and the needle is less likely to slip or move out of place.
C. The fingers do not guide the needle, the thimble finger does, using the fingers as a pivot.

2. Whether you sit cross-legged on the bench


BTW, what is the "bench"? In photos, it looks like a table. I assume that people who sit cross-legged no longer get the so-called "tailor's bunion"? Why don't they sit on the floor, or on a real bench?

or in a chair with one leg lapped over the other take note of the position of your arms in relation to the article being sewn.

A. Sit erect with your shoulders square to the article.
B. make sure your arms are 90 degrees or a little less, do not tense muscles use your knees/ knees as a base.
C. Notice in this position as you start your stitch, your head and postur will pull itself into the proper sewing position. With your eye trace the geometry thus formed from shoulder to the point of the needle. You should notice that your upper arm is in a neutral rest like position, with the lower arm in a right angle. keeping your thumb straight and in line from the elbow through the fore-arm allows for economy of movement. Also this posture, if the needle and thimble is held right will give the proper attack angle in relation to the seam. i.e. straight across and parallel to your shoulders. This position allows for natural sewing and if held properly allows for straight seams with out having to think about it.

*Note A: ALWAYS support the weight of the garment across your knees, never hold the garment up to sew.


Thank you. I was wondering whether you were supposed to hold up the work. I've seen some articles or books that suggested that.

*Note B: Use the hypothenar muscle of your palm


For anyone who's interested:

http://en.wikipedia....thenar_eminence

Posted Image

to steady your sewing hand upon your knee. Not only does this steady the sewing but the material being between the hand and palm allows you to gain leverage and a bit of a lamp on the material to allow you to strain the top layer to counter the fulling.
*Note C: Always advance the needle with the thimble and not the fingers, use the fingers as a guide for the needle.
*Note D: Formation of the back-stitch- this part is a little hard to explain in words, but allow me to try. In particular relation to the back-stitch the needle always bites the cloth in the down stitch nearly vertically. Do not rotate the sewing hand's wrist, but use the thimble to guide the needle into this position, with the hand in the neutral position. As the needle bites into the cloth and you insert the needle to the tips of the fingers, rotate the needle up into the neutral position. Now break the cloth OVER the point of the needle. As the point starts to bite into the lower layer start to strain the top layer of cloth by rubbing the top layer over the bottom layer between the index finger and thumb of your guide hand, using the sewing hand palm on the knee as leverage. Now advance the needle with the thimble as the point of the needle breaks the top layer. Advance until you have enough needle viable to take between the thumb and fore-finger at the required length of the stitch from the needle point. Pull the needle from the cloth straight up and at the apex of the stitch give a little tug up and out to set the stitch. Finally, as your arm come back to neutral, simultaneously sweep and reset the needle to take the next stitch.

OK I hope that helps to clarify a little more. This is an operation that is best shown.



Thanks a lot. This is AMAZINGLY detailed advice.

One more thing, I've just skimmed this and will print it out later. Clearly, I'm going to have to read through this several times with the materials in hand.

What do you think of the habit of some tailors of deliberating forcing their middle finger into position and weakening the muscle by tying on a piece of cloth that will restrict movement?

Edited by tailleuse, 10 May 2011 - 05:27 AM.

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#21 tailleuse

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Posted 10 May 2011 - 06:04 AM

Do yourself a favor and stop sewing aimless stitches in scrap fabric.


I'm familiar with that view, but for me at least, exercises are helpful.

As soon as you have the least bit of control move on to the simplest of alterations like hemming pants and taking in the waist and seat. Work on your own pants, buy cheap pants at the thrift store, maybe even do some for family and friends when you get the nerve.


I know that was just an example, but I rarely wear pants. I'm hoping to start sewing for myself soon, and I plan to start with some simple dresses. Maybe I'll try hand sewing them. I've also signed up for some tailoring classes.

I once bought a Ralph Lauren linen camp shirt on ebay for cheap. Maybe I'll try removing the hideous pockets to see if it is possible to do that without leaving holes.

Doing alterations is one of the best ways to learn. It lets you work on real clothes, gives you a feel for the needle, the machine, the cloth, let's you see the product of your work and how good or bad it is. This is where you should put your energy. Don't get ahead of yourself but don't dumb yourself down either. Hope this makes sense.



That may be true, but one reason I'm learning how to sew is that I haven't been happy with alterations made to my clothes. I need more than hemming. More radical alterations have ruined the design.

About 20 years ago, I bought a very nice Tahari Chanel-style suit in bouclé wool on sale. I was lucky to find it in a Petite size because back then many Petite sections were wastelands of rayon outfits and today many stores have closed their departments. For some reason I decided to have this particular suit altered by a person I'd read about in a New York magazine. I was at a near-record low weight. She did a beautiful job, but it was $100. 20 years ago. Unfortunately, now I can't fit into it.


Besides, many RTW fashions don't have decent-sized seam allowances. If I took something apart, it might stay "deconstructed." I'm short-waisted, so I would need to be able to shorten the bodice and probably move the darts most of the time. That's a complex alteration for a person with my experience and skills. Maybe if I gain confidence in sewing for myself and especially if I buy a dress form, I'll try doing more ambitious alterations of that type.

I do, however, appreciate your response.

Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#22 tailleuse

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Posted 10 May 2011 - 06:07 AM

Yes, holding the needle near the eye gives you no control and as the fingers are at a much lower leverage point, and the fact that you have to hold the needle much tighter between the fingers to maintain control is the reason why needles are so readily bent in this position. The method I learned and present in my book and above makes it quite rare to bend needles. The majority of needle breaks I have are point hooks due to breaking several layers of cloth over the needle point. But I am a masochist in this respect, and many people would opt to use a machine for thick layer sewing.


Oh, you go over some of this in your book, too? The more reason to buy it



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#23 tailleuse

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Posted 10 May 2011 - 06:10 AM

I disagree with Joseph. You are working on a foundation, repetitive movements for muscle memory and the longer stitches allow for this. When making alterations, you are going at short bursts, short seams and you concentrate more on the garment than the formation and mechanics of the stitches. Once you have a solid foundation then move on to what Joseph suggests. Trust me, a solid foundation builds confidence and reassures the student that when he does move on to what Joseph suggests then a better job will be had.


I would tend to agree, at least for me.



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#24 tailleuse

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Posted 10 May 2011 - 06:23 AM

Jason is right here, because of the long term (you want to be able to sew in your sleep). Though, I do suggest to work for 20 minutes or as long as your mind can reasonably handle it. Over time the mind will be able to do it for long hours.


Can I do it while I'm listening to the news on TV? Or do I need to give it my full attention?

Another suggestion is when you are finishing your time for the day stop on the best stitches and then begin the next day (learned this from a music teacher and its a much faster method of learning than the methods I used before).


When I've tried writing creatively and had control over my own time, I've tried something similar. Writing books call it "leaving some water in the well." Don't completely deplete your energy or enthusiasm unless you must because of a deadline. Otherwise there can be rebound effect.

Something analogous is a prouctivity method I sometimes use called "The Pomodoro Technique." You decide on a task, which may be part of a larger project and do nothing but that task for 25 minutes. Then you take a five-minute break and get up and walk around. The break is supposed to help you consolidate the information as well as provide some brief refreshment. After completing four sequences with brief breaks, you take a longer break.

I wonder if there's something about the human mind and sequences of 20 to 25 minutes.

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#25 tailleuse

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Posted 10 May 2011 - 06:50 AM

I tend to agree with Joseph. Stitches are intended to serve a purpose. The ultimate test is to see if your stitches are serving the end to which they are intended. For example, you can practice pad stitching two pieces of scrap cloth together but only when you pad stitch a canvas so it has shape and is smooth without bubbling have you really mastered this technique.

Still, you can start with pieces of scrap cloth. It is like riding with training wheels.



In an ideal world I would set up a sample very similar to a real project. But it's expensive and time-consuming. Every time I've made something in a class I've thought, "I wish I could make this three times in this class, then I'd never forgot how to do it and it would look really good." A couple of times I've even cut two projects, although I usually didn't finish the second project. I have a half-sewn second pair of trousers from last spring and I hope the professor I had is still teaching so I can get him to remind me how to do it. His method was different from that of everyone else.
Many fellow students think I'm nuts Posted Image and even I feel a little OCD at times (although someone REALLY OCD would have better results), but this is very detail-oriented work and I think that the essentials are sometimes dumbed down because there simply isn't time to teach everything. Plus, if you're entering the field you will inevitably learn these things. I don't feel bad about the need to compensate for that.


The fact that I was doing the project for the first time and only once on a deadline made it more stressful. For people who are already very experienced or who know that by dint of their work they will be required to sew 300 canvases this is probably not an issue.

Sometimes it takes me a few hours just to lay out a jacket or trousers and cut them from a pattern. I've only done it three times, and at least once I screwed up because the school pattern we had to buy wasn't properly labeled. It wasn't just the laying out that took time, although you do have to think a bit about it, but also finding a place to do it. I don't have a permanent workspace.

I have a noticeable scar from riding without training wheels before I was ready. Posted Image

When I develop some patterns for myself I will work on actual garments. But I hate projects that are time-consuming, that I would never wear, and don't fit me. Every school project hanging in my closet fits that description.

Edited by tailleuse, 10 May 2011 - 06:52 AM.

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#26 tailleuse

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Posted 10 May 2011 - 06:54 AM

It does, since it contains aluminium oxide granulate. A lot of grinding stones are made of that material. It is said you simply have to prick into it a few times, but I suspect that can dull a needle's tip. Therefore
I like to pinch the strawberry while withdrawing the needle. By doing that I always get smoothly sharpened needles.



Thank you. :-)


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#27 tailleuse

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Posted 10 May 2011 - 07:13 AM

Other little hand sewing lessons I learned the hard way:

You're supposed to baste close by the sewing line in the seam allowance. Believe it or not, nobody told me that. It seems obvious now, but it wasn't at the beginning. Here I would do all this extra work basting and the fabric still slipped.

If you're sewing heavy materials that have to match up, a simple basting running stitch may not be sufficient. You may have to add some back stitches. Wish I'd known that when I was basting that hideous corduroy waistband to those equally hideous corduroy pants I had to make. The fabric slipped and the back seams do not match up.

I've often done exactly what I was told or read and it still didn't work. Because the instructions were not sufficiently comprehensive.

If you're learning to sew for yourself and are not a kid, you have try to front load as much info as possible because you're not sewing 50 million things under a professional's supervision.

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#28 tailleuse

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Posted 10 May 2011 - 07:18 AM

Oh and please don't get me wrong. I'm talking about proficiency, not mastery.


Understood. What am I going to do? Climb into the TARDIS and set the dial to go back to the time I was 12, or even 20? Posted Image Then maybe my goal would be mastery.



I hate to be all "Oh, Kids Today," or "Oh, Home Sewers Today," but I'm frequently amazed by the misplaced self-confidence I encounter, in person and on the web. I feel like saying, "If people have devoted decades learning these skills, don't you think that it's probably going to take you a little more than a weekend to get good at this?"

Edited by tailleuse, 10 May 2011 - 07:31 AM.

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#29 tailleuse

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Posted 10 May 2011 - 07:24 AM

I would say that learning on scraps is good to start, until one has an OK result. As soon as the result is good enough, it's a good idea to work on real garments, because the difference of cloth, the place where you make your stitches, etc. has an influence on the result, and it's impossible to have scraps of every kind.

But the transition should not be too soon either. Nobody learns buttonholes by making buttonholes on a coat.

So, the problem is "how to know when it's good enough"... No easy answer on that. Either one has a teacher, or one has a good critical mind.


Same for pockets, BTW.


Merci bien de vos trucs et astuces de professionel, Homme de l'Ouest. :-)



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#30 Lo Zingaro

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Posted 10 May 2011 - 07:29 AM

My two cents.
I am putting an elastic on my middle finger, similar to the method taught by Jeffereyd in his blog. He used to tie a ribbon around his middle finger, I was luck enough to fine and elastic that fit my size, nice!
I found this to be a good thing, i have the tendency to keep the fingers a bit too "open", and the result is that you don't have control and accuracy on the job.
Another thing, already said but you know, "repetita juvant", is that you have to work on a straight surface, not holding the cloth and stuff suspended in the air. Apart from giving a messy perception of the whole thing, I found that even the stitches suffer a lot! They become less regular and even more difficult to be made themselves. I was hand stitching just five minutes ago, on my scrap cloth, near the table, on my legs. I found that some stitches were regular and some other don't. I found that those who were good were the ones done on the leg and the others were made in some kind of semi suspended, on hand messy way.

Hope it helps



Lo Zingaro



(sorry for my bad english again)

Edited by Lo Zingaro, 10 May 2011 - 07:30 AM.

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#31 tailleuse

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Posted 10 May 2011 - 07:52 AM

My two cents.
I am putting an elastic on my middle finger, similar to the method taught by Jeffereyd in his blog. He used to tie a ribbon around his middle finger

I've seen that post on Jeffereyd's blog. Thomas McMahon also described that method. An apprentice or young tailor at Anderson & Sheppard (Sunna?) also described doing it on the A & S blog. She was the one who described the need to "weaken the muscle" in the finger. That made me nervous. I also can't but think of Schubert (?) who designed a contraction to strengthen his fingers but it didn't work and he ended up crippling his hand.



.

Another thing, already said but you know, "repetita juvant", is that you have to work on a straight surface, not holding the cloth and stuff suspended in the air. Apart from giving a messy perception of the whole thing, I found that even the stitches suffer a lot! They become less regular and even more difficult to be made themselves. I was hand stitching just five minutes ago, on my scrap cloth, near the table, on my legs. I found that some stitches were regular and some other don't. I found that those who were good were the ones done on the leg and the others were made in some kind of semi suspended, on hand messy way.


Thank you. I think repetition is useful, too. I think it gets less credit than it deserves in the U.S. because it's not sexy. I imagine that ease in sewing on a flat surface becomes easier with time. It took me a while to be able to pin fabric on a table without lifting the material. I was told to aim for the "sweet spot." It was awkward at first, and I was working with stable woven cotton, I could have thrown it down on the floor and stamped on it and it probably wouldn't have made a difference. But I knew that one day I might be working with less forgiving fabric.

My mantra has become: "If I could do it in five minutes it wouldn't be a skill." The last month, I've taken a couple of short crafts seminars. I said it a lot.


Hope it helps


It does. Thank you. :-)

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#32 greger

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Posted 10 May 2011 - 07:03 PM

Tailleuse, some classes by "tailors" at some schools are pretend tailors. They don't even know what tailoring is. The classes are wonky sewing classes with tons of misinformation. There are thousands of books and magazines full of misinformation out there, to, In your travels and you see a real tailors shop stop in and ask a couple questions to learn. Don't take up to much of their time, but some will give you good advise, and some others will pull the wool over your eyes. When you learn real lessons delete the lessons from pretend tailors. If you hang on to pretend lessons how are you going to improve? Also, some of these tailors teach by showing with a few words, and you do what they show, to many questions and they lose interest. Some lessons are taught without explanations, later you understand why. Some of these tailors you learn from them by seeing and not by words. How other tailors do things you might mention and they might reply, but if you start cross examining them they probably will kick you out of the shop. After all they do things they way they do it because they think it is the best, and how another tailor does it they might not care about it at all, and they don't want to waste their time. Teachers set the curriculum, not the student. If you ask a question and they show you something else, maybe they think you are not ready for the answer to the question you asked. Some directions seem wrong but later you see why it works.

#33 R.m.Bakker

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Posted 10 May 2011 - 08:58 PM

My two cents.
I am putting an elastic on my middle finger, similar to the method taught by Jeffereyd in his blog. He used to tie a ribbon around his middle finger, I was luck enough to fine and elastic that fit my size, nice!
I found this to be a good thing, i have the tendency to keep the fingers a bit too "open", and the result is that you don't have control and accuracy on the job.
Another thing, already said but you know, "repetita juvant", is that you have to work on a straight surface, not holding the cloth and stuff suspended in the air. Apart from giving a messy perception of the whole thing, I found that even the stitches suffer a lot! They become less regular and even more difficult to be made themselves. I was hand stitching just five minutes ago, on my scrap cloth, near the table, on my legs. I found that some stitches were regular and some other don't. I found that those who were good were the ones done on the leg and the others were made in some kind of semi suspended, on hand messy way.

Hope it helps



Lo Zingaro



(sorry for my bad english again)


I was taught to hand sew in the same manner. It is not because you need to "weaken" the muscle or whatever, it's purpose is merely to teach the apprentice to sew with his THIMBLE finger rather than use any other finger (which is tempting when you start out)

By securing the thimble you learn how to keep your hand in the proper position in order to hand sew correctly. After a while you can take it off since your muscles will have adapted to holding your hand in the proper way.

to the OP:

When I started out I got some scraps of cloth, first only learning to do the sewing motion. So just a small piece of thread a needle and your thimble and only the movement was important. After doing that for 3 full working days straight (I was not allowed to do anything else) I was told to start with the running stitch. practice practice practice; then on to the backstitch. Again, practice practice practice. then on to another stitch. It was all I was allowed to do for about a month 5 days a week.

Suggestions would be to use a rather thick cloth; fuse it perhaps because it simplifies working as all you will want to focus on now is getting the "muscle memory" to learn exactly how to FORM these stitches rather then apply them to different sitiations.

Also use dark cloths, and a rather thick, white thread; i even used basting thread for a while. This allows you to better SEE what you do and allows you to form the stitches in a better way since it is more apparent if you don't do it correctly.

How to go from there is again just practice practice practice. As sator said, it is imperative that you start applying the skill you just learnt into a real situation, ie put it into practice. It's like with school; you learn all these things and when you come out of school you still don't know sh*t because you haven't applied the knowledge in a real situation.

At some point perhaps you want to make an interlining for a suit; just go at it. Don't expect it to work out but it's good practice nonetheless. Since pad-stitching a cancas includes ALOT of hand sewing it is probably one of the best ways to go from there; it is the most continuous practice you can get with hand sewing and also allows you to develop a feel for how cloth and canvas react to your movement; you learn how to handle the cloth in different situations.

As the months(yes, months.) progress you will gain more confidence and more speed in hand-sewing. If something doesn't work on the machine (ie you cant figure out how to do it properly) hand sewing always works very well. When I started making shirts a lot of the seams (flat-felled seams) were very hard to do with the machine with the little experience I had. After failing miserably many times I finally tried to do it with the hand; not only did that work because my hand sewing skills became very good before I started making garments. Doing it by hand, it also helped me UNDERSTAND the seam, which is really important. Nowadays for customers I still prefer to do it by hand because in my opinion it just makes a much nicer garment both visually and technically, but that's another point entirely.

Also as other people have said this is not learnt in a weekend. or a month, or maybe even half a year. You will keep developing for a very, very long while. That however does NOT mean that you can't start applying the skill you already have.

Sewing by hand is like the foundation of a house. Miss one of the foundations and your house will collapse. It is the most important thing of all in tailoring. Even if you do not use any handwork in making your garments you should always know how to sew by hand because as I said, if something doesn't work out you can fall back on that hand-sewing skill. Then by doing the seam by hand you will start understanding the seam and when you return to do it by machine it will now work out. Also when starting with pattern matching, basting is like the be all and end all of the result. Fail to properly baste it and you will not line up the seams correctly to match the patterns.

So after the initial stage, just go at it. Try stuff. Use the forum as a guideline, try different things out and see where you end up. If you do not have a teacher to learn you the trade pretty much all you can do is try, try try and fail miserably each and every time. But failing will help you to get where you want to be; you fall and you stand up and after a while you won't fall anymore, or well you will fall but you won't fall as hard.

Also what I want to say is that you shouldn't take everything that's written very literally. A lot of the books, guides and whatever explain how you need to do something but in the end you always end up doing it in your own way. You need to grasp the essence of what needs to be done and then do it in the way you feel is best. Following the instruction word by word is good the first time but you will realise that sometimes it is not explained correctly or the description is incomplete.

A hand-stitch or well not really a hand-stitch but more a technique that one forgets alot in the beginning and which is very important going further into your tailoring journey is learning how to full in a larger piece of cloth onto a smaller piece of cloth. I wish I would've learnt that a little earlier but again by falling and standing up you learn.

So there is no pre-determined timeframe in which you will "learn" hand sewing. Just practice!

edit: some answers to your direct questions:


*What kind of thread? Cotton or silk? Should I use beeswax?

As I said try a basting thread or a rather thick thread in the beginning as you will see the stitches better. This will allow you to stop the "weaving" and inconstisency you are describing; the errors you make are more apparent.

*For needles, I assume milliners for basting stitches, betweens and sharps for permanent stitches?

betweens and sharps. As said by others by a pack and after a while you will learn what to use in what situation.

*Recommended brands? What is your preferred method for keeping track of the needles, especially if you have bought the kind that are wrapped in a couple of folds of paper?

Prym in Europe probably. Keeping track of the needles? something I still need to learn and gave up learning. I always lose needles and I just buy a new pack :frantics:

Do you throw out your needles after a certain number of hours of use? Does that emery strawberry on old-fashioned pin cushions work to sharpen needles?

I throw them out when they bend. And most of the times I lose them before they blunt! Posted Image

*How long should the ideal practice session last, and how frequently?

As said no pre-determined timeframe. Read my post :)

*How many kinds of stitches should I try to master? Any particular order?

All stitches, but "master" is the wrong word. You will want to UNDERSTAND first. Basting/Running stitch and the back stitch are probably the first two, then the felling and pad stitch.

After that no particular order. Wait a little bit with buttonholes especially in the beginning since it's a much more advanced type of stitch and you will struggle a lot in the beginning.

*I need to mark a stitching line with chalk; that's not negotiable. But would it be worth it in addition to mark quarter inches along the horizontal line so I can train my brain, eye, and hand better? I've tried using marked tapes, called "Tiger Tape" and tick tape, but they're distracting unless I'm stab stitching. I took a class in which we were shown how to make a sewing gauge out of cardboard that is slid along the fabric as one sews, but I never got the hang of it.

Preferrably use a striped cloth; it will help you when you start out. You will need to learn how to do it without though so don't rely on it too much otherwise your brain might get used to having a guideline and then you end up in a situation where you don't have that guideline... yeah. You know what I mean :) forget the sewing gauge btw.

edit 2:

Posted Image

this is what we mean by securing the thimble finger.

Edited by R.m.Bakker, 10 May 2011 - 09:12 PM.

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#34 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 11 May 2011 - 02:48 AM

Nice to see another that gives practicality the same advice. Bedankt meneer Bakker
Silly Cognoscenti, Drape is for windows!

#35 Joseph

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Posted 11 May 2011 - 02:48 AM

I'm not sure who talked about showing your work to a more experienced tailor but I think that is really good advice. If you are not doing a classic apprenticeship situation than you have to grab little bits of information by listening and really watching what's going on. Every tailor has their own style. Good or bad tailor, you can always learn something. I have always found older tailors to be very gracious with advice and instruction. They are not always patient but you have to adjust to them- not vice versa.
You were talking about reconstructing your own clothes...this is a case where I would put the brakes on. The fact that you don't wear pants often has nothing to do with learning these basic operations. Try to take your style and opinions out of the process at such an early stage and just do what people suggest. The simplest plain hem trains you to fit, mark, cut, overcast, baste, distribute fullness, stitch, press, get paid. There is your foundation. You will have plenty of time to be creative later. I am inclined to assume that any information you receive on this forum is worth taking seriously. The time it has taken you to write 12 posts you could have done some work, taken a picture and shown it to these guys. Best,

#36 R.m.Bakker

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Posted 11 May 2011 - 04:31 AM

Nice to see another that gives practicality the same advice. Bedankt meneer Bakker


Geen probleem meneer Maclochlainn ! :thumbsup:

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