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Young tailor looking for work


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#19 jeffrey2117

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 08:16 AM

Schneider

Seit einigen Jahren liegt die Arbeitslosigkeit in diesem Bereich bei fast 50 Prozent. Nur ein wenig besser sieht es beim Textilgestalter aus, die Prognosen sind langfristig aber auch da schlecht, da sich die Textilbranche fast komplett ins Ausland verlagert hat. Alternative: Bekleidungstechniker bzw. Bekleidungstechnische Assistenten. Allerdings ist dies mittlerweile eher ein Reise- und Managementjob, der oft akademische Weiterqualifikation fordert. Bei großem Talent ist ein Modedesign-Studium ratsam.

Face the Reality, maybe someone will translate it.
Tailor: 50% unemployment! The answer is simple, to many tailors in the western world, period.


Hello Zuschneider,

Thank you for letting me know the link that I copied does not work.

The link copies, was at the begining of this post is working a moment ago for those interested.

Regards

Jeffrey2117
"An intelligent man knows he is ignorant, a ignorant man knows he is intelligent".

#20 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 08:38 AM

Tailor: 50% unemployment! The answer is simple, to many tailors in the western world, period.


I do not share DZ's cynical and nihilistic views :Skull: . Find your price-point, start making clothes, pimp your wares and your market will find you. Will it happen over night? NO, but if you love your craft and willing to make sacrifices it can and will pay off in the end. We all might not be able to buy estates in Cumbria like some tailors, but we can make a decent living from it.
Silly Cognoscenti, Drape is for windows!

#21 jukes

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Posted 27 March 2012 - 03:01 AM

I do not share DZ's cynical and nihilistic views :Skull: . Find your price-point, start making clothes, pimp your wares and your market will find you. Will it happen over night? NO, but if you love your craft and willing to make sacrifices it can and will pay off in the end. We all might not be able to buy estates in Cumbria like some tailors, but we can make a decent living from it.


There are probably too many Garment factories, definitely not enough tailors, the reason why demand exceeds capability. The major problem now is that there will be a lack of teachers due to the age of many tailors.

#22 peterhou

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 04:38 PM

Hello my name is Eric I am 28 and I have spent the last two years in Italy learning the art of bespoke tailoring from Maestro Luigi Gallo. My wife and I sold all we own in order to learn this art. I gave made four suites with a little guidence from my maestro. I am trained in pattern making as well as pants, vests and jackets. I was taught in the old methods of tailoring. Being that I do almost everything by hand (even the over-lock). I have just returned to the states and I am looking for a paid possition at a bespoke tailorshop. I am very passionate and will be the most dedicated worker you can find. Tailoring is my life and won't ever stop. I just need someone to guide me as I perfect my skills.
Thanks for your time


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#23 Cock of the Walk

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 10:49 PM

To Young Sarto.

Could you not start up on your own. It sounds like you do a hell of a lot of the work by hand, so maybe just a good iron and a bench for starters. When you sell a suit buy another piece of equipment ... I know it's not ideal, but you need to trust the skills you currently have and you will learn so much more from 'being the boss'.

#24 Youngsarto

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Posted 22 April 2012 - 12:57 PM

It seems that is the only route left for me. Thanks for all the replies.

#25 Nishijin

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Posted 31 May 2012 - 12:03 PM

Eric, I actually started on my own with less training than you, and learn while doing. It is hard, very hard, but doable.

I'm willing to share my experience with you in pm if you're interested. Might help you not doing some mistakes.


We may end knowing less than our elders in some areas. But we will also know more in other, because we can't learn the trade the "proper way", but have to use creatively just whatever seems like like being usefull.


I would not be surprised that making everything by hand, while being your only option for lack of equipment, would actually give you some competitive advantage, since many customers will see it as quality, and few people are willing to do it (we buy machines when we can because it makes our life easier).


I presume you are not willing to come to Europe ?
http://www.paulgrassart.com

Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society.
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#26 Sator

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Posted 01 June 2012 - 01:01 PM

It seems that is the only route left for me. Thanks for all the replies.



You are not the first to go down this track. It helps to befriend someone with experience who can be your mentor, but with or without a teacher you can call your Master, at some point you have to go out on your own. The important thing is being willing to constantly learn. Otherwise, you just keep repeating the same mistakes over and over. That's where a forum like this is of some help (if for nothing else for getting to know people).

Don't be too ambitious and make coats from start to finish and your own - not just because of the difficulty but because you have to be both good and fast to make money out of it. Unless you can employ someone to help you - to finish the coats, if nothing else - it is really tough running a one-man business. There is a good market for shirts, trousers and skirts to keep you busy. You can make bespoke ties too, so keep up on that skill too.

Also don't forget the importance of marketing and customer relations. Understanding eMarketing (website, Facebook etc) is also really important, as they are the new word of mouth.

Good luck.

#27 Nishijin

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Posted 01 June 2012 - 07:26 PM

A piece of advice : don't limit yourself on real bespoke tailoring. I wanted to do this, but I finally understood that it's a bad idea. On a 1 man shop, limited to bespoke, we make little margins and are barely able to earn enough to stay alive. This means we can't get cash flow to expand the business, and never have the money to do the first hire.
We are talking about managing a business, and usual business rules apply. I tried to cheat with them, and did not succeed.


So a better idea is to offer both bespoke and good quality MTM. Even if you don't like MTM. Because this will increase your cash flow, give you alternatives to deal with some situations (wedding suit in a hurry, that you would decline in bespoke because you may not make it in time, while you can have it done in MTM and this satisying the customer, or having a way to manage an overbearing customer without sending him to hell and loosing his money income).

Since I've gone that root, I really got peace of mind. And I can focus on the bespoke offer and enjoy it.

Bespoke is a craft business. Lot of work, high price but a lot of time and difficulties, which means small margins.

MTM is a commercial venture. You buy a product and service, add you margin, and sell it. It has a much higher cash flow, and needs very little money to start, and has a very confortable cash cycle since if you manage it well (meaning, as it should be done and all your competitors do it), you have income before you have to pay for cloth and service.

Offering both and not selling you soul to the devil is only a marketing problem, and it's easy to solve.
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http://www.paulgrassart.com

Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society.
Mark Twain

#28 Bespoke in Auckland

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Posted 09 June 2012 - 09:02 PM

Hi Young sarto Jeffery
How are you getting on? are you making whole suits? I saw your video and great publicity. anyone that can make nice buttonholes in that dim light has some skill. I am not completely familiar with apprentice pay but I did not earn more than 3k for 5+ years whilst learning. Approx how much does the Gallo school cost? Curious. If only tailoring was as popular as Psychology in the states. Good luck well done on a significant amount of progress. On the whole, tailors are a good community and very generous with their knowledge. Will follow your progress with interest
Brendon

#29 Che Pasticcio

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Posted 19 June 2012 - 11:14 AM

Rooting for you, Eric. Keep us up to date.

#30 Tara Lynn

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Posted 28 October 2016 - 11:21 PM

I am looking for a tailor/seamstress. I was wondering where you were at, your post was from 2011. How have you been getting along and are you still looking for a tailoring job? 



#31 Terri

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Posted 29 October 2016 - 11:46 PM

Tara, I am not intending to be rude, but after looking at the menswear offerings on your site, I will say that there are a few things that coukd definitely be improved.
If you want a critique you can pm me.
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