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#1 Claire Shaeffer

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Posted 30 May 2011 - 07:38 AM

I've just returned from Peru where I saw some beautiful llama and alpaca materials. Many were incredibly soft and like cashmere and camel hair, warmer than wool. Are any of you sewing on these fabrics?

Claire Shaeffer

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#2 meiissi

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Posted 30 May 2011 - 09:34 AM

Hi Claire,

I do. Do You have good new adresses?

regards,

meiissi

#3 jeffrey2117

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 12:18 AM

I've just returned from Peru where I saw some beautiful llama and alpaca materials. Many were incredibly soft and like cashmere and camel hair, warmer than wool. Are any of you sewing on these fabrics?



Hello Claire,

I had a lady in my shop yesterday with a length of Alpaca wool that was a beautiful reddish blend color and very smooth and soft to the touch.

She told me that she was in either Peru or Ecuador, selected the Alpaca that the fibers were harvested and had it woven specifically for herself to use as a shawl and sent to her address in the U.S..

I was interested to know if this is normal method for attaining Alpaca cloth or was the lady "pulling the wool" over me with a fabricated story.

I am also interested in any tips on working with Alpaca. It looked as if it would be difficult to work with.

Thank you for any information on working with this cloth would be appreciated.

Kind Regards

Jeffrey2117
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#4 ladhrann

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 03:07 AM

Hello Claire,

I had a lady in my shop yesterday with a length of Alpaca wool that was a beautiful reddish blend color and very smooth and soft to the touch.

She told me that she was in either Peru or Ecuador, selected the Alpaca that the fibers were harvested and had it woven specifically for herself to use as a shawl and sent to her address in the U.S..

I was interested to know if this is normal method for attaining Alpaca cloth or was the lady "pulling the wool" over me with a fabricated story.

I am also interested in any tips on working with Alpaca. It looked as if it would be difficult to work with.

Thank you for any information on working with this cloth would be appreciated.

Kind Regards

Jeffrey2117


An aunt of mine visited Peru and Ecuador and did something similar. I know that Vicuna and other rare camilids are highly regulated in both countries and in Ecuador I believe all the animals may belong to the national herd. I know that you could buy fleece or tops, yarn or locally woven handloomed cloth.

#5 jeffrey2117

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 09:17 AM

An aunt of mine visited Peru and Ecuador and did something similar. I know that Vicuna and other rare camilids are highly regulated in both countries and in Ecuador I believe all the animals may belong to the national herd. I know that you could buy fleece or tops, yarn or locally woven handloomed cloth.



Hello Ladhrann,

Thank you for the information, that is very interesting to know. Do you know what the 100% Alpaca wool is generally used for? Do people use it for their knitting projects mostly?

My grandmother would gather and spin wool and knit a great number of clothing items for the winter months.

When I was much younger, she showed me how to use her spinning wheel. She passed away over many years ago now.

Kind regards

Jeffrey2117
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#6 ladhrann

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 03:05 PM

Thank you for the information, that is very interesting to know. Do you know what the 100% Alpaca wool is generally used for? Do people use it for their knitting projects mostly?

My grandmother would gather and spin wool and knit a great number of clothing items for the winter months.

When I was much younger, she showed me how to use her spinning wheel. She passed away over many years ago now.

Kind regards

Jeffrey2117


My own great-grandmother spun her own wool too for Aran ganseys [sweaters] here in Ireland, she passed away before I had a chance to meet her. As far as I know it is relatively common for hobbyists or spinners in the USA/Canda & UK to keep their own flocks of Alpaca, Angora goats/rabbits and Mohair goats to produce fleece that they process themselves this seems to be separate from the commercial raising of the animals for large-scale production of fleece.

I do not see why 100% alpaca/vicuna could not be used for apparel, perhaps due to rarity? I know that the big cloth merchants have bunches with 100% vicuna Scabal for instance http://www.scabal.co...=special&id=134 & Vicuna in particular is very expensive http://www.examiner....86081-21061895/ in this example it was £4,000 per metre. I'm not sure about alpaca.

Edited by ladhrann, 28 January 2013 - 03:07 PM.


#7 dkst

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 11:46 AM

I have a length of dark navy alpaca cloth in a narrow herringbone design, I would estimate around 14oz. I made a coat out of it in my earlier days when my sewing skills weren't very good, so I didn't take any pictures. It's very soft cloth and it made a very warm coat to wear. I still have enough for another coat that I will make sometime in the distant future!

I sourced it from Sultan's Fine Fabrics in Toronto, Canada. I remember it being pretty reasonable at $100 per meter.

#8 jeffrey2117

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 04:16 AM

My own great-grandmother spun her own wool too for Aran ganseys [sweaters] here in Ireland, she passed away before I had a chance to meet her. As far as I know it is relatively common for hobbyists or spinners in the USA/Canda & UK to keep their own flocks of Alpaca, Angora goats/rabbits and Mohair goats to produce fleece that they process themselves this seems to be separate from the commercial raising of the animals for large-scale production of fleece.

I do not see why 100% alpaca/vicuna could not be used for apparel, perhaps due to rarity? I know that the big cloth merchants have bunches with 100% vicuna Scabal for instance http://www.scabal.co...=special&id=134 & Vicuna in particular is very expensive http://www.examiner....86081-21061895/ in this example it was 4,000 per metre. I'm not sure about alpaca.



Hello Ladhrann,

Thank you for sending me the information and the links. Scabals had good information on the Vicuna fibers that were very interesting. I found on Ebay, all types of fibers for sale in various states, from carded to raw.

This will be handy if I take up spinning and do not want to raise my own Alpaca's. I will need something to occupy myself upon my retirement to my country home.

My own Great grandparents from my fathers of my family were from County cork, County Kerry and Northern Ireland. My Fathers side came from the north. My grandparents and older Uncles could all speak Gaelic. My mothers family were decended from an Irish and Scots background.

Kind regards

Jeffrey2117
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#9 jeffrey2117

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 04:26 AM

I have a length of dark navy alpaca cloth in a narrow herringbone design, I would estimate around 14oz. I made a coat out of it in my earlier days when my sewing skills weren't very good, so I didn't take any pictures. It's very soft cloth and it made a very warm coat to wear. I still have enough for another coat that I will make sometime in the distant future!

I sourced it from Sultan's Fine Fabrics in Toronto, Canada. I remember it being pretty reasonable at $100 per meter.



Hello DKST,

Thank you for the information on sourcing Alpaca cloth, I will check their website.

How did you find working with your coat? Did you have any difficulties working with this fabric? Iron work, fraying, cutting, etc..? Curious to know cloth has similar charactistics as Harris Tweed for example.

Thank you all for your advice and time to respond.

Kind Regards

Jeffrey2117
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#10 dkst

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 01:14 PM

It is a loosely woven cloth, frays quite easily and is very soft.

I only tried it because it was something novel. I'm in no rush to make up the remainder of the cloth because it's a little too warm for my liking. Maybe next winter.

I've also made a camel hair sport coat. It had similar properties, very soft and lofty. Didn't seem as warm, but this was quite a loosely woven cloth.

#11 jeffrey2117

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 07:51 AM

It is a loosely woven cloth, frays quite easily and is very soft.

I only tried it because it was something novel. I'm in no rush to make up the remainder of the cloth because it's a little too warm for my liking. Maybe next winter.

I've also made a camel hair sport coat. It had similar properties, very soft and lofty. Didn't seem as warm, but this was quite a loosely woven cloth.



Hello Dkst,

Thank you for letting me know how this Alpaca fabric handles, I have been very curious about what. I checked Sultan's website and online catalog and did not see any 100% Alpaca, I did see a Cashmere/3% Vicuna blend.

I conducted alterations for a camel hair overcoat for a special client about 13-14 years ago. The fabric used was beautiful and smooth to the touch and easy to handle. The client with the overcoat had it for 30-35 years, it was well maintained and still retained its beauty. The client passed away in 2000.

I was thinking recently of making myself a short overcoat for next winter. I wanted to base it on a military coat from my Regals book, double breasted, nice wide lapels.

Kind regards

Jeffrey2117

Edited by jeffrey2117, 01 February 2013 - 03:21 PM.

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#12 ladhrann

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 02:27 AM

Hello Ladhrann,

Thank you for sending me the information and the links. Scabals had good information on the Vicuna fibers that were very interesting. I found on Ebay, all types of fibers for sale in various states, from carded to raw.

This will be handy if I take up spinning and do not want to raise my own Alpaca's. I will need something to occupy myself upon my retirement to my country home.

My own Great grandparents from my fathers of my family were from County cork, County Kerry and Northern Ireland. My Fathers side came from the north. My grandparents and older Uncles could all speak Gaelic. My mothers family were decended from an Irish and Scots background.

Kind regards

Jeffrey2117



Jeffrey thats very interesting. I know that certain cousins of my grandparents in Boston were brought up in Irish/as Gaeilge and so even though they'd never been here they' could speak it fluently to any who visited with them.


I conducted alterations for a camel hair overcoat for a special client about 13-14 years ago. The fabric used was beautiful and smooth to the touch and easy to handle. The client with the overcoat had it for 30-35 years, it was well maintained and still retained its beauty. The client passed away in 2000.

I was thinking recently of making myself a short overcoat for next winter. I wanted to base it on a military coat from my Regals book, double breasted, nice wide lapels.

Kind regards

Jeffrey2117


I got some nice camelhair from a UK mill not too long ago in a 850g/m weight. PM me if you want the details.

#13 jeffrey2117

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 03:21 AM

Jeffrey thats very interesting. I know that certain cousins of my grandparents in Boston were brought up in Irish/as Gaeilge and so even though they'd never been here they' could speak it fluently to any who visited with them.




I got some nice camelhair from a UK mill not too long ago in a 850g/m weight. PM me if you want the details.



Hello Ladhrann,

Yes, my fathers family originally moved from Ireland to South Boston before they moved south, outside of Franklin, MA. We have a lot of distant cousins.

I am very interested in the Camelhair cloth. I sent you an email, but not certain if you received it or not. Please email me the details.

Kind regards,

Jeffrey2117
"An intelligent man knows he is ignorant, a ignorant man knows he is intelligent".




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