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The Aesthetics of the Extended Front Dart


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#55 Sator

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Posted 21 September 2011 - 11:21 AM

As an aside, the origins of the Italian zuppa Inglese:

Recipes for this sweet first appeared in the towns of Parma, Bologna, Forlė, Ferrara and Reggio Emilia, all in the Emilia-Romagna region, in the late 19th century. Its origins are uncertain and one theory states that it originated in the 16th century kitchens of the Dukes of Este, the rulers of Ferrara who had frequent contact with England, when they asked their cooks to try to recreate the sumptuous "English Trifle" they had enjoyed at the Elizabethan court.


It too is reputedly a "failed" attempt at copying the English. In doing so they ended up producing something uniquely Italian.
Gustav Mahler (1860-1911): "Tradition ist die Weitergabe des Feuers und nicht die Anbetung der Asche."

"Tradition is about passing on the flame, and not the worshipping of ashes"

#56 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 21 September 2011 - 02:17 PM

If the Italian Rock of Eye artists draft in inches, that tells me alot... :hi: :LMAO:

Schneidern heisst, viel Wissen, viel Arbeit und keine Kohle im Sack, dafuer aber viele Kunden, die alles besser wissen.  :Big Grin:


#57 jukes

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Posted 21 September 2011 - 03:56 PM

Nothing wrong with drafting in inches, each to their own. Most of the so called "great minds" drafted in inches.

#58 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 21 September 2011 - 10:41 PM

Nothing wrong with drafting in inches, each to their own. Most of the so called "great minds" drafted in inches.


That's right, nothing wrong with inch in UK. I just was funny.
I wonder if Henry Poole still works in inch. I will ask someone who knows the shop.

Schneidern heisst, viel Wissen, viel Arbeit und keine Kohle im Sack, dafuer aber viele Kunden, die alles besser wissen.  :Big Grin:


#59 Schneidergott

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Posted 22 September 2011 - 07:12 AM

There is a reason why Germans, unlike the British, are not famous for their good sense of humor!Posted Image

We do (or in this case sadly did) have a few greats, though!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sLptVEiG-NY




I'm pretty sure that telling to draft in inches adds the same "mystery" to a garment for Italian customers like using "rock of eye" does it for US customers.

So please don't get too personal, what we are talking about here is just a bloody dart (sorry, got to wash my mouth out with soap and water...Posted Image)!

Dart or sidebody is not just a matter of style, but also one of necessity, or at least it should be. Some figures can have an extended front dart (or a fish shaped one, which, following the same logic, is also outdated), others a sidebody, and I'm with jukes on that one, the decision should be (ideally) left to the tailor/ cutter.
But unfortunately, since the advent of the iGents, the decisions are made by the customers. So a Neapolitan jacket without an extended front dart is a no-no on certain fora. Also, not having a manica camicia will raise some eyebrows. If both are missing it's almost a waste of money.

Interestingly, when browsing through my set of 1972 Rundschau magazines, I find several examples of coat patterns (mostly DB, but always with a patch pocket) with an extended front dart.

Comparing pictures of coats with and without an extended front dart one might add to the pros of the extended version that it can support the impression of a masculine shape by visually slimming the front. Well, given that the coat is not extremely tapered in the waist in the first place.

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#60 jukes

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Posted 22 September 2011 - 03:27 PM

The Germans certainly do have a sense of humour, coming back from one of many trips to Germany, about 30 minutes from landing the left engine went up in flames ( i was sitting right behind it ) bearing in mind the plane only had two engines, it was clear there was a big problem, anyway the plane started to skew from side to side and it was clear the pilot was struggling to line the plane up with the runway when on the approach. He eventually got the plane on the ground (albeit at a strange angle)
When we were on the way to park the plane, the captain ( German airline, German crew) came on the speaker system and said " please excuse the smell coming from the cockpit, that was close" i burst out laughing, thought that was hilarious,what a great comment from the captain, mind you it also had something to do with the adrenalin rush (fear) subsiding.
We found out that the reason for the failure was bird strike, next time you fly and are 30 minutes from landing, look out the window and see how high it is, i for one didn't know birds flew that bloody high.

#61 jukes

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Posted 22 September 2011 - 04:50 PM

If a customer ( I Gent) came to me and told me how to cut and i thought it not be appropriate, i would refuse the work. Your reputation relies on YOUR work, not something read on the internet by someone who thinks that they then know better than what takes a lifetime of study, practice and sleepless nights to achieve.
Would the same people tell a surgeon how to perform a complex operation, maybe, would the surgeon take any notice, highly unlikely.




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