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Trimmings for bespoke shirt-making


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#19 Nishijin

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Posted 05 March 2012 - 02:43 AM

I don't understand. You are still in the process of making your very first shirt, but you already have enough experience to recommand an interlining supplier ? You are the fastest learner in the world ! Can you describe your test process ?
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#20 napoli

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Posted 05 March 2012 - 03:35 AM

I don't understand. You are still in the process of making your very first shirt, but you already have enough experience to recommand an interlining supplier ? You are the fastest learner in the world ! Can you describe your test process ?



Still on my first shirt, but have done 30 collars and cuffs or so before, achieving the perfect collar or pro looking one was the most difficult task imho.

Sure, getting fused interlinings from the top brands ( the last one will arrive this week)

Then do collars with the removable trick of the button, and trying them on on a rtw shirt I removed the collar so was a peak one not of my taste.

The results were from morbido ( too soft on italian ) to not very stiff , to the stiffness I was looking for from my best neapolitan shirts. That is my quality test.

Also best ones were more like letīs say, " transirable " and felt better on my neck, as soft brushed ones, bad ones did feel like an artifact on my neck.

Am I doing well?

#21 Nishijin

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Posted 05 March 2012 - 04:22 AM

And what about washing them ? Do they still look good after 50 washing ? At different temperatures ? Ironing ? Bad treatment ? How to they interact on different kinds of fabric ?

How to apply the fusing ? How to get good enough results when you can't afford a 10000$ press or oven (the kind used by shirt factories) ?


You choose based on the stiffness you like. This is your taste. It is not a really professional test. A shirtmaker needs to make to the stiffness his customer want (it has not always been so, but today, with Internet, customers are picky). Achieve same feeling with different cloths. Adapt stiffness to different styles...

Shirt interlining is a huge domain.


Now, Gygli have a very good reputation. I don't doubt they are good quality. I myself have been recommended DHJ, and the advice came from a very, very good shirtmaker who has been making top-quality shirts for his whole life. He told me DHJ was good, which doesn't mean others aren't. He never had the time to test everything. There are DHJ products he never tried. So he just talk about what he knows and have been using for a long time.


I am also very surprised you could get samples from every top brand, when I know some professionals who struggle to get some. I'm even more surprised you could get them so quickly, when less than 2 weeks ago, you were asking questions about who makes interfacing. I am even, even more surprised you are already considering you master collar-making and achieve pro quality when you still haven't bought your thread. All I can imagine is that there is a lot you are not saying (well, I can imagine something else, too...).

I've been making garments for years now, have good equipement, know how to use it, and I'm still not happy with the result when I try to make a shirt collar. Your success really is amazing to me.
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#22 napoli

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 06:33 PM

And what about washing them ? Do they still look good after 50 washing ? At different temperatures ? Ironing ? Bad treatment ? How to they interact on different kinds of fabric ?

How to apply the fusing ? How to get good enough results when you can't afford a 10000$ press or oven (the kind used by shirt factories) ?


You choose based on the stiffness you like. This is your taste. It is not a really professional test. A shirtmaker needs to make to the stiffness his customer want (it has not always been so, but today, with Internet, customers are picky). Achieve same feeling with different cloths. Adapt stiffness to different styles...

Shirt interlining is a huge domain.


Now, Gygli have a very good reputation. I don't doubt they are good quality. I myself have been recommended DHJ, and the advice came from a very, very good shirtmaker who has been making top-quality shirts for his whole life. He told me DHJ was good, which doesn't mean others aren't. He never had the time to test everything. There are DHJ products he never tried. So he just talk about what he knows and have been using for a long time.


I am also very surprised you could get samples from every top brand, when I know some professionals who struggle to get some. I'm even more surprised you could get them so quickly, when less than 2 weeks ago, you were asking questions about who makes interfacing. I am even, even more surprised you are already considering you master collar-making and achieve pro quality when you still haven't bought your thread. All I can imagine is that there is a lot you are not saying (well, I can imagine something else, too...).

I've been making garments for years now, have good equipement, know how to use it, and I'm still not happy with the result when I try to make a shirt collar. Your success really is amazing to me.


I didn´t see this answer as I don´t control the forum features yet.


Is there any function where I can see all my post and click them ? If not I am lost.


I received this week more samples as DHJ Fusetopo 160, I liked the way it fused very fast and properly and didn´t smell as glue junkie home as some other brands.

Have you ever tried other references from DHJ?


Yes my unpro test was stiffness only, you got me! :spiteful:

I tried also with several irons, from several home ones, to semi pro to my girlfriend´s expensive one with not very pro results until I found that my mother´s basement stored heavy old one with no holes on it from the 1960s did the best job fusing. I was shocked as well.

Where can I learn about adding tolerances to a shirt pattern for different bodies or slim/ business etc model ? Each maker has his own " trademarks " as I guess ?

Is out there any table so I can read to learn. I was told that italians for tailoring have achieved their perfection out of studying books of anatomy and medical measure recordings of the mediterranean men from 2 centuries to nowadays and that is why their rtw fits so perfect .

I did search tolerances but nothing was about. I guess it might be on the taking measures books some members do as on the coatmaking section. I have read at this time like 1/3 of the forum to avoid doing dumb questions as you told me Nishijin, but could´t find any.



What do you mean All I can imagine is that there is a lot you are not saying (well, I can imagine something else, too...).


Well I watched well on my visits to Naples based tailors and shirtmakers, might be that what you mean. But I got no clue what you suggest, I am curious. :sorcerer: :good:

Edited by napoli, 21 March 2012 - 06:55 PM.


#23 amateursarto

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 08:02 AM

I can attest to the quality of Freudenberg/Gygli. I received 4 sample cuts from their NA office in North Carolina. They sent: a light and mid weight fusible and a midweight and heavy weight sew in interlining. With the midweight fusible, I fused using my heat transfer press at 166 F for about 17 seconds and it fused well, with no strike through, no discoloration, and the midweight interlining didn't dominate and make the shirting rigid. I then soaked the sample collar in water and pressed it on my clamshell press. Neither the cloth nor the interlining shrank. I did it again and again, and same result. This is good stuff. I've tried so many interlinings that I can tell almost immediately if I've got some junk or if it's good. The stuff I received from F/G, which by the way is their Vilene cotton interlining, is high quality. The technical sales director even said that he'd work something out so that I can purchase below the minimums. Having said that, maybe a group buy would be in order for those who are interested in either sew in or fusible collar interlining. What do you all think? I haven't checked on prices, but if this stuff was available at fabric stores in the US, I would buy whole rolls of it. I hate running out and then having to wait or use stuff geared toward the general public. I want the professional grade trimmings. Coupled with good cutting and sewing, it's possible to achieve great results. Without it, not so much.

The heavy weight sew in interlining might interest those who make detachable collars. It's substantial, has a firm weave, and is still soft and pliable. The technical sales director said that it's a new product. I look forward to purchasing some soon. I too have difficulty sourcing professional grade cloth and trimmings even though I am somewhat knowledgeable, ask politely, always offer to pay for samples/swatches, and pay my bills in advance or at the least soon after receiving the invoice. I would imagine a lot depends on where you live.
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#24 jeffrey2117

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Posted 24 March 2012 - 11:17 AM

Hello Sir,

Has anyone on this thread ever used a six hole button? I had not seen these before.

Does anyone make gold buttons? I did have a client with solid gold buttons.

I would remove for cleaning and resew them to his DB jacket he used while sailing.

Regards,

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#25 ladhrann

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 08:56 AM

Hello Sir,

Has anyone on this thread ever used a six hole button? I had not seen these before.

Does anyone make gold buttons? I did have a client with solid gold buttons.

I would remove for cleaning and resew them to his DB jacket he used while sailing.

Regards,

Jeffrey2117


Of old it would be common for men to have either gold or more usually silver buttons for shirts, these would normally be the push-through or stud-type button, as they would be too valuable to leave on the shirt. Such buttons would always be made by a jeweller. I've seen 6-hole buttons before and of course the manufacturers will make how many holes you want. However the 4-hole I think is more elegant and unfussy.




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