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DHJ POLYTEMP fusible


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#1 Nishijin

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Posted 17 February 2012 - 03:53 AM

Looking at the DHJ website, I've seen that they have a new interfacing for shirts, Polytemp, which has a light, temporary fusible. If I understand it well, it would be as confortable to use as a fusible interfacing while making the shirt, and it washes away at first wash, leaving a classical non-fused interfacing.

Has anyone tried it ? It sound really interesting, and I don't think I have seen it at my interfacing retailer.

http://www.dhj-inter..._nouveautes.htm
I don't know why, the information is only on the French page, not the English one. :Confused:
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#2 shirtmaven

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Posted 17 February 2012 - 04:00 AM

sounds like a good trick for factories with automated equipment and not the finest collar makers.
but
Most americans use commercial laundries.
sounds like you will see wrinkles on the face of the collar when the laundry does not stretch the
collar before pressing.

#3 Nishijin

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Posted 17 February 2012 - 04:07 AM

A famous brand of "luxury" shirts explains that the ripple of fabric along the edge seam of the collar is a sign of quality, since it proves that the collar has non-fusible interlining. So yes, you will see wrinkles, and it's a feature now, not a bug anymore. :spiteful: So few people know how to properly iron a shirt...

And yes, it is a good trick for factories. But if it means working faster as a bespoke shirtmaker, for a good result, then why reject technology ?

I'll contact them see if I can get a sample, but usually it is hard for me to buy direct, I need a retailer.
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#4 shirtmaven

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Posted 17 February 2012 - 04:14 AM

the wrinkles I refer to are not on the edge of the collar but along the stitch of the collar because the fabric has been pushed to one side.

time saving btw fusing and lining is minimal.

#5 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 17 February 2012 - 01:29 PM

A famous brand of "luxury" shirts explains that the ripple of fabric along the edge seam of the collar is a sign of quality, since it proves that the collar has non-fusible interlining. So yes, you will see wrinkles, and it's a feature now, not a bug anymore. :spiteful: So few people know how to properly iron a shirt...

And yes, it is a good trick for factories. But if it means working faster as a bespoke shirtmaker, for a good result, then why reject technology ?

I'll contact them see if I can get a sample, but usually it is hard for me to buy direct, I need a retailer.


You are very right, keep going. Modern material enforces modern making. There are always people from yesterday, stitching thick edge tape into 7oz fabric...

Edited by Der Zuschneider, 17 February 2012 - 01:29 PM.

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#6 amateursarto

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Posted 18 February 2012 - 04:32 AM

shirtmaven and others,
recently i have been doing a lot of supplemental work making dress shirts and that leads me to want to acquire professional cotton fusing in larger quantities. do any of the companies mentioned in the other thread on the apprentices' subforum, (the one where the op is making his first handmade shirt), sell to people like me: semipro home based operations with a need for small to medium sized quantities of their products? thankfully, i recently established a commercial account with an italian cotton shirting mill and their product is fantastic. now i need to get both fusible and sewn in collar lining sources. i also need to find a dedicated buttonhole machine at a reasonable price. but first things first.

Edited by amateursarto, 18 February 2012 - 04:35 AM.

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#7 Todd Hudson

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Posted 18 February 2012 - 05:50 AM

for cheap but strong lockstitch straight-cut buttonholes, Singer 71 series are worth scrap metal prices. This machine has a bobbin similar to a bartacker. You can still get some small parts for them. However if the cams wear out too badly then take it to the dump. My very good mechanic gave mine a few more years after taking apart the bottom, showing me the parts that wear down that are unavailable then putting it back together. All those old Singer 71 machines are gonnna have the cam parts wearing down so don't assume you can just get another machine for parts to fix others. Anyhow, when they do work, the buttonholes are very strong, military grade lockstitch.

Otherwise just get a Reece AMF S2: most shirtmakers use them, they are common on Craigslist in USA for cheap and you can probably get parts for them. The downside is that the Reece is one thread chainstitch buttonhole so not as strong as a lockstitch.

#8 amateursarto

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Posted 18 February 2012 - 07:23 AM

Todd,
I had a lead on a Singer 71-101 in San Clemente, CA. But since that's 1,800+ miles away, I decided against pursuing it. The guy wanted $400 for it and it was complete with table, bobbin spool holder, and lights. I planned on driving my truck out there and picking it up, but things got hectic and that was that. Are the Singers pretty plentiful? I planned on saving up and buying a good refurbished Juki for about $1500, but that's down the line. For now, I have a computerized Brother home machine that makes nice, completely automatic buttonholes with a simulated purl stitch sewn around the inside of the buttonhole. It's good for now. If my business takes off, I will get a dedicated buttonhole machine. I also have a heat transfer press 16X25 for fusing and a strong Singer 31-15 that I sew on as well as an older all metal White 4 thread serger.

Edited by amateursarto, 18 February 2012 - 07:24 AM.

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#9 Nishijin

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Posted 18 February 2012 - 09:18 AM

You need to find somewhere in the US to buy interlining. I can give you an address in France, but shipping and custom taxes will be very expensive in proportion to what you're buying.
Send me a pm if you really don't find a local source.
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#10 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 19 February 2012 - 08:22 AM

Todd,
I had a lead on a Singer 71-101 in San Clemente, CA. But since that's 1,800+ miles away, I decided against pursuing it. The guy wanted $400 for it and it was complete with table, bobbin spool holder, and lights. I planned on driving my truck out there and picking it up, but things got hectic and that was that. Are the Singers pretty plentiful? I planned on saving up and buying a good refurbished Juki for about $1500, but that's down the line. For now, I have a computerized Brother home machine that makes nice, completely automatic buttonholes with a simulated purl stitch sewn around the inside of the buttonhole. It's good for now. If my business takes off, I will get a dedicated buttonhole machine. I also have a heat transfer press 16X25 for fusing and a strong Singer 31-15 that I sew on as well as an older all metal White 4 thread serger.


What heat transfer press do you have?

Edited by Der Zuschneider, 19 February 2012 - 08:35 AM.

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#11 amateursarto

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Posted 19 February 2012 - 01:31 PM

I've got one like this. I got it used locally.

http://item.mobilewe...nid=78050178909
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#12 amateursarto

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Posted 19 February 2012 - 01:36 PM

I've also got an old Singer clamshell press that gets super hot. It's at least 20 years old.

Edited by amateursarto, 19 February 2012 - 01:39 PM.

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