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Savile Row Academy: International students & Visas


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#1 bot_bot

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 02:37 AM

I'm considering registering for the Savile Row Academy, and wanted to know how other international students have gotten their Visas to attend their courses.

From the looks of it, the Academy is not listed under the approved Tier4 sponsors and, so, applying for a student Visa isn't possible. Also, the courses are only part-time (and not full-time as is required for Tier4).

I'm from Canada, in my mid-30s, and don't have grandparents who are British.

Any help from fellow international students would be greatly appreciated! :)

#2 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 03:03 AM

I think Canadians don't need a visa for Europe. They travel under 3 months visa waiver. Without student visa you are a tourist you cannot official work in Europe.
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#3 Kevin Koch

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 04:09 AM

the Academy is not listed under the approved Tier4 sponsors and, so, applying for a student Visa isn't possible. Also, the courses are only part-time (and not full-time as is required for Tier4).

Even so, any legitimate educational institute should assist you with this. I worked for 7 years in International Education and we always provided assistance for anyone that we accepted (letters of recommendation, formal invitations, etc.) I also wrote the J1 visas for visiting scholars, those not attending under a student visa. I honestly don't know about the Euro-system, but perhaps they have another classification that will work for you. Many organization just don't want to hassle with it, but if they expect to broaden their student base, they must.
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#4 jukes

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 04:56 PM

Give them a call, they will be able to advise correctly.

#5 Lewis Davies

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Posted 17 March 2012 - 10:06 PM

cannon recommend high enough

#6 boysdontcryy

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 05:49 PM

Care to share your experience?

#7 bot_bot

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 02:26 AM

Update: In the end, I decided not to attend their program.

After corresponding with them, I received no help in terms of getting a Visa. Actually, my last email asking about Visas and international students was not answered. I can only assume, then, that the Academy is not approved as a Tier 4 Sponsor (a designation needed to get a UK visa). I could be wrong, though.

Anyway, I've decided that more school is not going to help me break into the industry. If I'm going to spend $50K-100K on education (tuition + living expenses), I'd rather spend that money on actual stuff to build a business. Plus, I'm not looking to get into bespoke tailoring.
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#8 greger

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 09:20 AM

Canada was/is part of the British empire, therefore a shoo-in to any of those countries that were part of it. That includes work, school, visit or retirement. If any papers- very few. The Canadian government should easily have all the answers you needs.



#9 jcsprowls

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 11:58 AM

I was under the impression that Canadians were citizens of GB and did not require a visa to go to the UK for pleasure, study, work or residency.
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#10 bot_bot

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 12:26 PM

I was under the impression that Canadians were citizens of GB and did not require a visa to go to the UK for pleasure, study, work or residency.



I wish that were the case, b/c then it would have been so much easier!

If I were just a few years younger (35 and under), I could apply for a Working Holiday Visa (in which case, I could work and study as I pleased--for up to 2 years, I believe). But, I've reached the age cutoff. Sadly, the UK does not offer me, as a CND citizen, any special considerations over other non-UK citizens. But, that would have been different, if I had a grandparent who was British, which I don't.

In any event, the Savile Row program is not approved as a sponsor under Tier 4, so can't go that route.

If I really wanted to attend the program (which I don't anymore), I would apply to a full-time university or college that's approved under Tier 4 (like LCF or Saint Martins), and attend both programs. But, that would be crazy expensive! :shock:


PS-Just to clarify: if I were to attend the Savile Row Academy, I would actually be living in the UK for two years (as opposed to visiting for a few months and coming back to CND and then going back to the UK).

Edited by bot_bot, 22 March 2013 - 12:34 PM.

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#11 jcsprowls

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Posted 23 March 2013 - 03:12 AM

You did say all that earlier, didn't you. Apologies...

Anyway, I've decided that more school is not going to help me break into the industry. ... Plus, I'm not looking to get into bespoke tailoring.


Let's peel this back, though...

- What are your real aspirations, then?
- Why do you feel training is critical to achieve this end?
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#12 bot_bot

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Posted 23 March 2013 - 11:39 AM

You did say all that earlier, didn't you. Apologies...


Oh, no worries! I was rambling on a bit... :)




Let's peel this back, though...
- What are your real aspirations, then?
- Why do you feel training is critical to achieve this end?


Well, I'm still interested in men's wear, specifically trying to create my own line of RTW jackets (sport jackets, leather jackets, and some outerwear). Still at the very early stages, though. Just completed a certificate fashion program at the local college. But, most of the program concentrated on women's wear and industrial construction techniques. And, so, b/c I was interested in making men's jackets, I thought going full on bespoke would be worthwhile. And, what better way than to learn on Savile Row! :)

But, over the course of a year, I've managed to draft and make a few jackets by hand. I could still learn a lot by going to the Academy, but spending close to $100,000 (USD) probably isn't the best use of my funds--especially since I don't want to get into bespoke tailoring. At this stage, I think, there's better--and cheaper--ways to give me some bragging rights. :p

#13 jcsprowls

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Posted 25 March 2013 - 04:00 PM

If you're trying to create a RTW company from the ground up, learning how to tailor custom clothing is a nice-to-have. But, it's not your critical path.

If you truly desire to become a wholesale brand, the best experience is working in a suit factory - spending a few years (say: 3-5), there. Truth be known, you won't likely get a job as a cutter or patternmaker right away. But, you can get in the door, then learn new things after work hours from your colleagues.

There's manufacturing in Montreal and Toronto. Granted, many shops are reducing volume. But, there's still a range of RTW being produced, there - from budget- to luxury-grade.
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