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Savile Row Academy: Short Courses


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#1 Aiori Lee

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 07:14 AM

Hello,

I can't help but notice that many have recommended the Savile Row Academy. I found from skillset.org that there are 4 short courses available:
-Coat Making
-Foundation Course: Tailoring and Cutting
-Pattern Cutting and Fixing
-Trouser Making

May I know if anyone have enrolled for these courses, and if you could share your experience with me, please? For example, what about the course you like/dislike?

Thank you.

-Aiori

#2 Lewis Davies

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 06:09 AM

the only place to go

#3 beaubrummel

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 09:20 AM

Is there anything like it in the states? I'm not exactly able to get back and forth on my jet and all. :Big Grin:

I don't see too much information on it as far as class schedule and what have you. But I would like to know more and how I may be able to attend.

#4 tailleuse

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 12:34 PM

Is there anything like it in the states? I'm not exactly able to get back and forth on my jet and all. :Big Grin:

I don't see too much information on it as far as class schedule and what have you. But I would like to know more and how I may be able to attend.


The Fashion Institute of Technology's Menswear Department offers a series of tailoring courses that are open to the public, in addition to their regular students. The teachers tend to be older Italian tailors who had/have their own businesses. Unfortunately, the classes get canceled if enrollment is insufficient. In addition, you usually have to take a preliminary course called "Menswear Sewing," which is excellent.

I tried to find a link, but I don't see one.


UPDATE:

Here's a link with descriptions. Look for the "Tailoring" entries.

http://www.fitnyc.edu/2585.asp

I don't think that the men's tailoring classes are offered during the summer, which is probably a good thing. (Too much work to cover.)

I think that the first course in the Ladies Tailoring series is offered during the summer. That series is administered by a different department. You make two tailored skirts in it.

Edited by tailleuse, 17 April 2012 - 12:58 PM.

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#5 beaubrummel

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 09:35 PM

I am aware of the program at FIT, theyre currently changing the menswear program and combining it with some design/womenswear from what ive heard.
How would one go about taking the courses at savile row academy if youre stateside?

#6 tailleuse

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 06:56 AM

I am aware of the program at FIT, theyre currently changing the menswear program and combining it with some design/womenswear from what ive heard.
How would one go about taking the courses at savile row academy if youre stateside?


I don't know a whole lot about what's going on with the Menswear Department at FIT, but my understanding is that the program underwent an administrative change. Instead of being a separate department, it became part of Fashion Design. I think degree candidates now apply to the FD. It's a two year program, but I know there were some questionnaires circulated to the full-time students asking how long the program should be.



The classes I mentioned are open to people to full-time Menswear students and people who are not working towards a degree but have the prerequisites.


I wouldn't know anything about applying to the Savile Row Academy from the U.S.


Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#7 Gordon C Wong

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Posted 13 June 2012 - 01:20 PM

Hi Aiori,

You can't go wrong with the Savile Row Academy. For the following important reasons, first the name Savile Row Academy help with sales if you are a graduate of the academy and have a diploma hanging on the wall. Second the connection to suppliers like fabric wholesaler or notions are incredibly valuable to a young tailor start out on they own. Third there would be sufficient enrollment to stop the courses being dropped. Fourth work experience would be easier to get in one of tailor firm on Savile Row, because the student have become somewhat of an insider in the trade rather than person walking off the street. Those are the four good reasons.

FIT is still very good in that old tailors are a gold mine of skills and knowledge, if you get to know them. Because of the low interest in being a tailor there might be courses that are drop from lack of enrollment. The big plus with FIT is that the tailor instructor would have been semi-retired and have lots of time on their hands.

Perhaps you can convince the tailor to teach lessons on the side who knows, in time the old tailor would be your mentor. I have a mentor he was a master German Cutter and Tailor and I learn a great deal from him.

Regards

#8 City Line Tailors

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 04:00 AM

Hi Aiori,

You can't go wrong with the Savile Row Academy. For the following important reasons, first the name Savile Row Academy help with sales if you are a graduate of the academy and have a diploma hanging on the wall. Second the connection to suppliers like fabric wholesaler or notions are incredibly valuable to a young tailor start out on they own. Third there would be sufficient enrollment to stop the courses being dropped. Fourth work experience would be easier to get in one of tailor firm on Savile Row, because the student have become somewhat of an insider in the trade rather than person walking off the street. Those are the four good reasons.

FIT is still very good in that old tailors are a gold mine of skills and knowledge, if you get to know them. Because of the low interest in being a tailor there might be courses that are drop from lack of enrollment. The big plus with FIT is that the tailor instructor would have been semi-retired and have lots of time on their hands.

Perhaps you can convince the tailor to teach lessons on the side who knows, in time the old tailor would be your mentor. I have a mentor he was a master German Cutter and Tailor and I learn a great deal from him.

Regards


Has anyone here actually attended Savile Row Academy? I've beening looking for a former student as a reference to make sure the school it
reputable and I hoping some can go into detail about their experience at SRA.

Thanks

City Line

#9 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 01:18 PM

Perhaps you can convince the tailor to teach lessons on the side who knows, in time the old tailor would be your mentor. I have a mentor he was a master German Cutter and Tailor and I learn a great deal from him.

Regards


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#10 tailleuse

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 01:26 PM

FIT is still very good in that old tailors are a gold mine of skills and knowledge, if you get to know them. Because of the low interest in being a tailor there might be courses that are drop from lack of enrollment. .

Regards


I've signed up for the same tailoring class two or three times and it got cancelled because too few people enrolled. I think it's going to happen again. Posted Image



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#11 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 03:29 PM

Perhaps I should open up my shop to students.
  • tailleuse likes this
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#12 Lewis Davies

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 06:13 AM

i went
cannot speak highly of it
good teachers learnt a lot and im glad i went there

Edited by Lewis Davies, 25 January 2013 - 06:16 AM.


#13 tailleuse

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 07:50 AM

i went
cannot speak highly of it
good teachers learnt a lot and im glad i went there


Did you mean to say: "I cannot speak highly enough of it."?

Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#14 City Line Tailors

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 11:10 AM

Perhaps I should open up my shop to students.



Where are you located? I would one be able contact you?

#15 amateursarto

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 03:52 AM

One of the professional tailors here talked about doing some videos and real time online instruction for a fee. I know it's not the same as an academy or a real apprenticeship, but I would pay for such instruction. I bought Mike Maldonado's shirt making course, and while I already could make a good dress shirt, his videos are invaluable because I learned new things and can go back and refresh my memory whenever I need to. My shirts are now of higher quality and take less time to make.

Edited by amateursarto, 01 February 2013 - 03:54 AM.

AMATEURSARTO

#16 tailleuse

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 06:04 AM

Where are you located? I would one be able contact you?


I believe he's located in San Francisco. If I lived out there, I would definitely try to set up some sessions. Why don't you PM him?

If you search this forum for a post I started called something like "How to Teach Oneself Hand Sewing," J.M. described some exercises he had some students do.

Edited by tailleuse, 01 February 2013 - 06:09 AM.

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#17 tailleuse

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 06:08 AM

One of the professional tailors here talked about doing some videos and real time online instruction for a fee. I know it's not the same as an academy or a real apprenticeship, but I would pay for such instruction. I bought Mike Maldonado's shirt making course, and while I already could make a good dress shirt, his videos are invaluable because I learned new things and can go back and refresh my memory whenever I need to. My shirts are now of higher quality and take less time to make.



I've just started a class, but would be open to hearing about this. I'm interested to hear you liked the Maldonado course. It looks very thorough, and at least one other person on this forum said at the time that it was good.



Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#18 boysdontcryy

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 05:48 PM

How tempting...




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