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#1 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 11 April 2012 - 11:34 PM

What other ideas you have to keep seams down and creases sharp in certain fabrics?

Edited by Der Zuschneider, 12 April 2012 - 07:00 AM.

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#2 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 12 April 2012 - 04:12 AM

empty

Edited by Der Zuschneider, 12 April 2012 - 07:00 AM.

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#3 posaune

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Posted 12 April 2012 - 06:46 PM

Well, I learnd to dab a little bit "essigsaure Tonerde Lösung" (aluminum acetate??????, this is what google translated) on the creases wrong side of fabric - but that was some years ago. Seams were hold down with a wooden plank till cooling.
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#4 greger

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 03:58 AM

Clapper, Beater, smasher, basher... get the idea? Never heard of putting the beater on and leaving it on. Clapper, Beater is the action the tailor makes and the name of the action stuck for the name of the item that is used. Some say you are quickly knocking the steam or moisture out of the cloth, kinda like a vac table, but the force of hitting is more pressure than the heavy iron. So it is killing two birds at the same time. Next time you get angery at somebody go press some creases into some nice trousers, you anger should be putting in some nice creases.

On cotton cloth beating it doesn't seem to do anything.

#5 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 04:47 AM

Yeah, I have all those things and you get a nice crease for a couple of days but then you can watch how the crease gets dull at certain fabrics.
We need the secret tricks here...

Normally you wear the trousers one day walking and driving and its time to iron them, LOL.

Oh, I just solved the first year apprentice question, why the crease don't last.
Anybody else can solve it as well? Need to ask the right question then.

Edited by Der Zuschneider, 13 April 2012 - 06:22 AM.

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#6 Schneidergott

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 06:47 AM

In the RTW industry they have a silicone based liquid that will make the front crease stay permanently (I think the term is permacrease)!:drinks:
They apply it on the inside of the front legs.

"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

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#7 greger

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 09:49 AM

With all the additives in making cloth, such as fire retardent, etc., it looks like we need another chemical to counter the other chemicals. Some people can't work with some types of cloths because of these chemicals. When chemcials get regulated is after humand damage, because they don't know if there will be damage or what kind of damage. Guess I'll have to look for silicone based liquid crease enhancer.

Thanks Schnedergott.
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#8 Brave Tailor

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 02:29 PM



Look how he presses iron with his foot!
sort of pressing lever.
at first seconds of 4-th minute.

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#9 Brave Tailor

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 02:35 PM

Smtms I use simple soap or laundry powder.
Just light concentrated water solution, attach it by paintbrush.

! before cut down the buttonhole also for not disperse fabric .

Edited by Brave Tailor, 13 April 2012 - 02:52 PM.


#10 Schneidergott

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 04:52 PM

With all the additives in making cloth, such as fire retardent, etc., it looks like we need another chemical to counter the other chemicals. Some people can't work with some types of cloths because of these chemicals. When chemcials get regulated is after humand damage, because they don't know if there will be damage or what kind of damage. Guess I'll have to look for silicone based liquid crease enhancer.

Thanks Schnedergott.



http://www.youtube.c...h?v=s2S3eLrdqk4



They mention and show the process at about 4:00 min into it.
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"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

http://www.dressedwell.net/ It's snarky, but fun.


#11 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 11:42 PM

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=s2S3eLrdqk4



They mention and show the process at about 4:00 min into it.


Unbelievable, what the industry has for technique. Many tailors cannot reach that quality of sewing like those machines do.
I know about permacrease, you industrial machines in order to do that.
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#12 Brave Tailor

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 04:00 PM

Unbelievable, what the industry has for technique. Many tailors cannot reach that quality of sewing like those machines do.
I know about permacrease, you industrial machines in order to do that.


Fastfood.

#13 Schneidergott

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 01:17 AM

Fastfood.


True, but just like fastfood it's efficiently made. So still working without modern equipment like a steam iron and a suction table (as a professional) is not efficient. You're wasting time you can spend on other areas of the production or maybe even on other garments.

BTW, the strange thing is that they apply the permacrease solution on the lower crease only. They seem to leave out the more (and most) important part of the thighs.

"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

http://www.dressedwell.net/ It's snarky, but fun.


#14 ACECAPS

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 05:29 AM

hey guys,
my estimated colleague from silesia,polska revealed her secret of permanent crease:
she put a fishing line inside the centre front.
when pressing with hot iron and moist rag, the fishing line melted down w/o seeping thru.
tada- voilà the perma-crease!!
must try this on swatch,
before spoiling your best customer´s cashmere tweed summer shortsPosted Image
http://t0.gstatic.co...W7pPb7tI8N1o07P

#15 ACECAPS

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 05:48 AM

i reckon the agent would glue the thigh lining to the fabric.

#16 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 07:20 AM

The fishing line might not melt.
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#17 greger

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Posted 18 April 2012 - 04:58 PM

A while back there was some speacial glue thread for home sewers that is/was used for creases. But is it a good idea for professionals? Maybe it comes from the industrail.

#18 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 08:58 AM

The point is that all glues must be a very thin line like a fishing line, and this only a machine is able to do.
The idea with the fishing line would be an excellent idea if only the line would melt.

The apparel industry works with a quality today many professional tailors hardly achieve. That created a problem for the tailors. The industry was cheaper and cleaner. The expensive tailors nowadays need to be able to produce the same fine 6 - 8oz. suit quality like the industry but with a better fitting.
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