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#19 Todd Hudson

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Posted 22 April 2012 - 11:47 AM

A problem I noticed on flannel trousers I made is that the crease over the area of rayon lining would not hold even on the vacuum table with heavy iron. It's possible the lining was put in too full so it was springing out the crease.

On fusing: A friend of mine fuses a long strip of fusible interfacing down the trouser crease lines to help keep the crease. However, I don't think she is ironworking shaped creases into her trousers as taught on this forum.

I have not tested this, but if I wanted to fuse the crease, I would ironwork shrinking/stretching first the center lines as needed for fitting the anatomy. Then I would press out any creases that resulted from the iron work on a narrow surface. Then on same narrow surface, I would press on the fusible strip to wrong side. Then I would put in the final crease on face of cloth. The fusible should be lighter in weight than the cloth.

#20 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 22 April 2012 - 11:44 PM

Todd, don’t even try it to fuse the crease. I have tried it, it looks dilettantish. The crease becomes a small stripe. If you can cut a fuse stripe 1mm wide it would work but this is not possible nor such a small stripe had the power to glue.

The problem is known since the crease came into exist and 1957 the problem was solved. Also the reason why a crease don’t last. It is completely out of a Tailors hand when the crease don’t last in certain fabrics.


The article is in German, whoever wants to translate it... it explains the whole matter what is going on with the crease in the fabric.
The one who speaks German has a clear advantage in his tailor life.

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Edited by Der Zuschneider, 22 April 2012 - 11:46 PM.

Schneidern heisst, viel Wissen, viel Arbeit und keine Kohle im Sack, dafuer aber viele Kunden, die alles besser wissen.  :Big Grin:


#21 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 04 May 2012 - 12:55 AM

Soaping seams works well, they are hammered flat now.

Edited by Der Zuschneider, 04 May 2012 - 11:31 PM.

Schneidern heisst, viel Wissen, viel Arbeit und keine Kohle im Sack, dafuer aber viele Kunden, die alles besser wissen.  :Big Grin:


#22 Bespoke in Auckland

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Posted 29 May 2012 - 09:02 PM

In pressing I use Holland or Linen . Experiment press a seam with steam leave it for any time it will not close up much. Press it after steam then place holland over the seam and press. The seam will close up . I also do this for the crease line of a trouser.
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#23 Martin Stall

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Posted 25 October 2012 - 07:55 PM

Soap is best. Sharpen a bar of white unperfumed soap, draw on the inside of the crease. It will reshape the fibers under the heat/moist/pressure.

Don't use a lot of soap, it could shine through and make stains.

ALWAYS test on a swatch!
Sure, I believe your work rocks, but... have you considered, how are you going to sell that stuff?

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