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Trouser Drafting Systems--A Brief Comparison!


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#1 arthurkrichevsky

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Posted 15 August 2012 - 04:17 AM

Hello everyone,

I was hoping we could get some clarification (As much as is possible at least!) about various trouser cutting systems. I did my research on Cutter and Tailor Forum and I have found the major systems to be: Mansie, Mitchell, Rundschau, Tailor & Cutter. I may have missed some but these 4 were the major ones described in detail with significant literature posted online. What I thought would be great, is to provide a brief comparison/contrasting of these systems. Perhaps points such as... Ease of application? Style (Slim vs. classic vs. whatever)? Accuracy and quality(Is this system worth spending time one? Or riddled with problems?)? And anything else that anyone can think of.

I was hoping this post could provide responses from members in order to create a comprehensive understanding of these major systems in comparison to each other. Thus simplifying the decision making process and the work of finding a starting point and progression for beginners!

Thanks!
Arthur Yakov Krichevsky

#2 Sator

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Posted 15 August 2012 - 12:02 PM

Drafting systems aren't intended to produce a certain style. Once you have familiarised yourself with a drafting system, you make the changes to fashion/taste/style yourself. These are the inessential bits of the draft.

The default fashion of the draft will be those of the date of publication. For example if you use a '70s Rundschau or T&C, you will get a '70s style.
Gustav Mahler (1860-1911): "Tradition ist die Weitergabe des Feuers und nicht die Anbetung der Asche."

"Tradition is about passing on the flame, and not the worshipping of ashes"

#3 posaune

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Posted 16 August 2012 - 07:10 PM

I agree with Sator. Nevertheless I have compared some drafts using the same measurements because for me the shaping is in the back trouser and I wanted to know how it differs. I attach 4 trousers drafts plus the comparison of the back sides. Just for curiosity (and fun) I have not drafted them down to the dot.
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#4 arthurkrichevsky

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Posted 17 August 2012 - 05:43 AM

I agree with Sator as well and I was reluctant to add "Style" to that list, I intended for this to be more of a comparison of difficulty vs. ease and accuracy vs. problematic drafting measures. That was an interesting post comparing those different systems! Thanks for the post!

#5 Schneidergott

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Posted 17 August 2012 - 07:26 AM

I find that each system has it's pros and cons, so the tailor/ dressmaker using the system has to be able to adjust the system to the individual needs.
I have tried 4 different drafting methods from 3 different countries (Germany, Italy and Great Britain) and when used properly they all give a similar good result.
The British draft had a straighter rear seat seam than the standard Rundschau or Panaro/ Ciraci trousers, but that mostly depends on the era those latter drafts are from (mid 50's to 60's).
Newer Rundschau drafts are more close fitting and therefore also straighter at the rear seat (trousers of the 50's were more roomy Posted Image).

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#6 greger

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Posted 17 August 2012 - 10:05 AM

The long front fork and then the newer which are short front forks. Not sure if that is a style changer or not. My experiance is I like the long fork most, but maybe that is because I don't understand enough of the short for fitting methods.

#7 Sator

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Posted 17 August 2012 - 12:25 PM

The British draft had a straighter rear seat seam than the standard Rundschau or Panaro/ Ciraci trousers, but that mostly depends on the era those latter drafts are from (mid 50's to 60's).
Newer Rundschau drafts are more close fitting and therefore also straighter at the rear seat (trousers of the 50's were more roomy Posted Image).


In other words, even though we talk about seat angle as being an "objective" fit related variable, in reality there is actually some leeway to adjust it according to taste/fashion. More angle produces a more roomy and comfortable but less clean pair of trousers. It all depends on your priorities.
Gustav Mahler (1860-1911): "Tradition ist die Weitergabe des Feuers und nicht die Anbetung der Asche."

"Tradition is about passing on the flame, and not the worshipping of ashes"

#8 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 17 August 2012 - 12:57 PM

A shorter front fork produces a cleaner front trouser fall at the fly down to the hem even though it is only an inside seam displacement.
Wider trousers have a 1 cm longer front fork length. Every trouser ease has a different crotch diameter to be calculated.

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