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#1 OJD

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Posted 29 August 2012 - 05:52 AM

I have used a domedtic steam generator and iron for quite some time now and not really impressed. The stuff I press dont really keep any shape. So what to do? It seems all tailors seems to like their heavy dry irons. So I bought one. It's an old 6 kilo (13.3 pounds) iron with a 800 watt heating element, but it lacks a thermostat. Do I need one? Thinking about buying a replacement thermostat for a 800 w steam iron and hacking that inside. Anybody done something like that? Or buy a 800 w dimmer and using that, problem with that solution is that the iron would still get awfully hot, just slower.

Also, do you think I would be set with this setup? Do I need a real steam iron as well?

#2 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 29 August 2012 - 09:07 AM

I have an American dry iron with Adjustments High/Low/Med. After a while on low it gets high hot. So I just use it on High to get it fast hot. If it smells I know it is too hot or if I grab the hot handle. After a while you get used and you know if it is hot enough or not. I don't even check with the finger any more.

A thermostat would be nice but it is not really necessary. When you leave the house check the iron if it is switched off.
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#3 Philip_AMS

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Posted 29 August 2012 - 04:34 PM

I can't remember the brand that many of tailors in the uk use I think it's dousel but having used one I was impressed. They get super hot.

I have a grossag 1000w iron 4.5 kilo but it never seems to get really hot like those dousel irons. I remember turning one up slight too high only to find it could practically set fabric on fire cause it got so hot.

#4 OJD

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Posted 29 August 2012 - 05:38 PM

Google finds nothing on dousel. Where can I get one?

#5 Prakash Parmar

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Posted 30 August 2012 - 01:37 AM

Dear OJD,

In my 26 years of tailoring experience I have realized that very light fabrics (265 gsm & lighter) are best handled with a steam iron, but there is a catch. If you use the steam iron on a jacket, since there are many layers in a jacket, the stem will impact the most on the top layer & not so much on the bottom layer, this creates a wavey effect on the reverse side. The best way to use a steam iron is to have a vacuum table to iron on, preferably with a buck which allows for ironing in moulded areas like the chest, sides & the back. for the shoulders the buck needs to be changed to a smaller buck. By using a vacuum table, the iron goes through the garment allowing for all layers to be ironed evenly.
For professional ironing, the table has to have both: 'Suck' & the 'Blow' options. the blow feature throws the air up from the table allowing for ironing only on the top layer of he garment without shrining it as the seam is immediately dispersed on the sides by the blowing air.

we have considered setting up a massive boileer to fed stem to the 80 odd irons we use, but have opted to use an iron with an inbuilt seamer & a bottle attached to it. I have attached a picture for your reference.

you can find this product here:
http://nbfanghung.en...A-ES-94AL-.html

I am not sure where you can get this in your country, in dubai we buy it from our local supplier Transgulf enterprises.

I have a picture to show you, but never seem to find a way to attach a picture, someone please help.

The only word of caution i will give you for this iron is that you have to either use desalinated water & clean the bottle regularly to remove the green stuff that will grow in the desalinated water. Or if you use normal tap water you will have to open the iron on a regular basis to remove the silt that forms inside of the iron.

Your second option would be to opt for an iron with a mini boiler unit. Karcher makes these.

Please note that we use these irons with a teflon shoe, we never get any iron burn marks since we use the teflon shoe.

#6 OJD

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Posted 30 August 2012 - 05:24 AM

Dear OJD,

In my 26 years of tailoring experience I have realized that very light fabrics (265 gsm & lighter) are best handled with a steam iron, but there is a catch. If you use the steam iron on a jacket, since there are many layers in a jacket, the stem will impact the most on the top layer & not so much on the bottom layer, this creates a wavey effect on the reverse side. The best way to use a steam iron is to have a vacuum table to iron on, preferably with a buck which allows for ironing in moulded areas like the chest, sides & the back. for the shoulders the buck needs to be changed to a smaller buck. By using a vacuum table, the iron goes through the garment allowing for all layers to be ironed evenly.
For professional ironing, the table has to have both: 'Suck' & the 'Blow' options. the blow feature throws the air up from the table allowing for ironing only on the top layer of he garment without shrining it as the seam is immediately dispersed on the sides by the blowing air.

we have considered setting up a massive boileer to fed stem to the 80 odd irons we use, but have opted to use an iron with an inbuilt seamer & a bottle attached to it. I have attached a picture for your reference.

you can find this product here:
http://nbfanghung.en...A-ES-94AL-.html

I am not sure where you can get this in your country, in dubai we buy it from our local supplier Transgulf enterprises.

I have a picture to show you, but never seem to find a way to attach a picture, someone please help.

The only word of caution i will give you for this iron is that you have to either use desalinated water & clean the bottle regularly to remove the green stuff that will grow in the desalinated water. Or if you use normal tap water you will have to open the iron on a regular basis to remove the silt that forms inside of the iron.

Your second option would be to opt for an iron with a mini boiler unit. Karcher makes these.

Please note that we use these irons with a teflon shoe, we never get any iron burn marks since we use the teflon shoe.


Thank you for your reply. I have domestic iron with boiler, if I buy another steam iron it will be with boiler too. From specs people seem to be more happy with boilers than gravity fed units.

#7 Measure Man

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Posted 30 August 2012 - 06:02 AM

Google finds nothing on dousel. Where can I get one?


The company is Dowsing, they now make mainly snooker table irons

#8 OJD

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Posted 12 September 2012 - 03:00 AM

Ok, I've tried my vintage tailor iron (took a while to get it and to find a suitable plug). It gets extremely hot. Scorched my pressing cloth.. In it's current state I don't see how I can use it? I wouldn't dare to put it on worsted wool..

I have to get some sort of thermostat for it..

#9 Schneidergott

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Posted 12 September 2012 - 04:37 AM

Once the iron is hot enough you need to unplug it or it will heat up until everything melts.
Casoli is a good brand when it comes to heavy weight tailor irons. The sole is chrome plated and glides easily. And it has a thermostat.

http://norrissteam.c...li-dry-iron-5kg

The iron is quite expensive, but it should last many years. Like this one:

http://www.ebay.com/...N-/300362281504

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#10 greger

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Posted 12 September 2012 - 09:15 AM

The company is Dowsing, they now make mainly snooker table irons


Does this company have a website? All I see is other companies selling them.

#11 OJD

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Posted 12 September 2012 - 09:31 PM

Once the iron is hot enough you need to unplug it or it will heat up until everything melts.
Casoli is a good brand when it comes to heavy weight tailor irons. The sole is chrome plated and glides easily. And it has a thermostat.

http://norrissteam.c...li-dry-iron-5kg

The iron is quite expensive, but it should last many years. Like this one:

http://www.ebay.com/...N-/300362281504


Thank you. So unplug when hot enough? Ok, got it. It keeps heat extremely well. Keeps hot for hours. But will try to modify it with a thermostat, and lower the handle.

#12 Measure Man

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Posted 12 September 2012 - 10:25 PM

Does this company have a website? All I see is other companies selling them.




I got my Iron from Lear Browne & Dunsford who were the agents for a while, I think they only make snooker table irons now??

This is the external thermostat box to use with irons with no thermostat.


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#13 OJD

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Posted 13 September 2012 - 01:16 AM

I got my Iron from Lear Browne & Dunsford who were the agents for a while, I think they only make snooker table irons now??

This is the external thermostat box to use with irons with no thermostat.


Posted Image
dowsing

Where can you get a box like that? Same place?

#14 Measure Man

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Posted 13 September 2012 - 02:02 AM

All the modern Irons have the thermostat built in so I would think the only way to find one now is to get it 2nd hand.

#15 OJD

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Posted 13 September 2012 - 07:11 AM

Veit has a separate thermostat for their dry iron it seems. I don't get how the dowsing thermostat works. Is there a sensor in the iron? Looks as if you plug in an ordinary uk three prong plug, i.e. Line, neutral and earth. Fascinating.

#16 Katherine Maylin

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Posted 13 September 2012 - 07:53 AM

The box pictured above is called a simmerstat.
I have an 8lb Dowsing dry iron plugged into one of these and it regulates the temperature as the iron itself does not have a thermostat.

#17 OJD

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Posted 13 September 2012 - 08:37 AM

Thank you. I know the old irons have no thermostat as I have an old iron myself that is one of the points of this thread.

So this simmerstat, what kind of times are the on-off cycles? My iron got crazy hot in like a couple of minutes, and kept hot for hours. So for a low setting it would like run for 5 minutes and then one minute every other hour? Just curious...

#18 OJD

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Posted 13 September 2012 - 08:44 AM

Wow, there are simmerstats on ebay for catering appliances which knobs are identical to the dowsing knob. Could it be so simple? Katherine, you made my otherwise lousy day.




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