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H. Huntsman coats with extra chest bulge?


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#1 Gimp

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 08:15 AM

Hello,

Does anyone know whether it's typical for Huntsman coats to have a kind of extra 'bulge' right next to each armhole? That's at least what this photo (attachment) suggests, featuring Peter Smith, Huntsman's General Manger (left) and head cutter Patrick Murphy (right; centre is new owner Roubi l'Roubi btw.)

Is there any benefit to having that bulge? To my eyes it looks like a mistake, however, I wonder how their tailors created that bulge. Is it an excessively large dart, cut into the canvas from the armhole side, that creates this effect?

A photo in higher resolution is available here.

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#2 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 09:22 AM

That extra nasty bulge comes from the 1945 - 1970 cutting, it is an extra ease of 3.25cm ease with 1/4 Bu. - 1.5cm. Today, you have about 1.5cm ease in the chest, it is a small bulge like the ease in the back. Germans did a big deal in this nasty bulge when they loved to tailor potato sacks with lacking waist suppression. It took the Germans until 1999 to figure out that 1/4 Bu. - 2.5cm or 1/5 Bu. + 2.5cm was still too much.

Edited by Der Zuschneider, 23 January 2013 - 02:18 PM.

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#3 Naive Jr

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 12:35 AM

Zuschneider, you are really an expert!
Scribimus indocti doctique poemata passim

#4 jukes

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 01:23 AM

Its called drape, which can exist in both the back and front.

#5 Naive Jr

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 02:12 AM

Its called drape, which can exist in both the back and front.

I do not understand how a bulge can be called drape?

PS: The new owner of Huntsman seems to have designed the men's clothes of Holland & Holland, about which Sator warned me in regard to the jacket I had in mind that it was rather outdated. It is presumed by most reports of the new ownership that readers know who previously owned Huntsman's and never mentioned.

Edited by Naive Jr, 30 January 2013 - 02:15 AM.

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#6 jukes

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 02:27 AM

Look at the back of a drape coat, would that also be a bulge ? The pictures shown are of a fully draped cut, which means the drape is in both the back and the front of the coat.

#7 Schneidergott

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 02:40 AM

Zuschneider, you are really an expert!


Can you imagine how much suits Huntsman could sell in Texas if they actually had such expertise? :drool:
Mind boggeling, isn't it?

Besides, back in the 50s the loose silhouette or "potatoe sack" was a world wide fashion, just as the close fitting shape of the 70s was. And German tailors made that, too.

"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

http://www.dressedwell.net/ It's snarky, but fun.


#8 Naive Jr

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 04:18 AM

Look at the back of a drape coat, would that also be a bulge ? The pictures shown are of a fully draped cut, which means the drape is in both the back and the front of the coat.

Yes, but what does that have to do with the issue or matter of the bulge? PS: I have re-read the posts, and I must retreat because you are all professionals. I obviously do not understand the deeper level of the problem.

Edited by Naive Jr, 30 January 2013 - 04:28 AM.

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#9 Naive Jr

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 04:23 AM

Can you imagine how much suits Huntsman could sell in Texas if they actually had such expertise? :drool:
Mind boggeling, isn't it?

Besides, back in the 50s the loose silhouette or "potatoe sack" was a world wide fashion, just as the close fitting shape of the 70s was. And German tailors made that, too.

Dear Schneidergott,

I regret you are so far away. I could offer you a special language exchange program and plague you with my questions. The potato sack is the dominant shape here in Southwestern Germany and Switzerland. I do not get excited about it anymore because I can order online RTW from UK. I do get a bit excited because RTW Huntsman are not online. Many and much are the same in German viele and viel. Germans and German Swiss simply have another taste, and I don't think WW2 helped except for present day sensitivity to militarism. May I put my RTW waistcoat photos online here for criticism? Is Sator still in seclusion?

Edited by Naive Jr, 30 January 2013 - 04:25 AM.

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#10 Gimp

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Posted 31 January 2013 - 09:56 AM

Does that "nasty" Huntsman bulge, which runs parallel to the sleeves, really classify as drape? In my understanding, 'drape' means that an extra or 'unneeded' amount of fabric runs across the chest and creates the impression of actually draped fabric; see this contemporary (and well executed) example of Lapo Elkann wearing a white DB coat:

http://images.thesar...apo_3984Web.jpg

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#11 greger

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Posted 31 January 2013 - 12:03 PM

Right now many styles are availiable to wear, including drape. There have been many styles of drape (whatever tailors and customers could invent). If custom made by tailors (Britts call custom- bespoke, believe the French call custom- grand measure) the coat needs to be fitted as well as the stye (so, this is two types of fitting per-garment).

Drape is purposeful extra cloth that gives a "drapes" look. You can have it right in front of the armhole, center of the chest, or both or more or a anywhere you can figure out how to do it. Most drape ends at the waist, but I saw one that went to the hem, and it was a very nice coat!

#12 dkst

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Posted 31 January 2013 - 03:09 PM

I think those gentlemen look very nice in their suits. I prefer a bit of excess there, it allows more easy movement with the arms externally rotated or abducted (think waving them away from your body). It will prevent the lapels from flying off the chest when you move your arms away from the body.

#13 napoli

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 01:43 AM

Is even worst than spanish tailors ( worst ever ) that say " we are better than Savile Row and Naples "

http://www.lavozlibr...11/zapatero.jpg


http://estaticos03.c...adillos_1_0.jpg



How much is that crap?

#14 murtadza

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 05:42 PM

Is even worst than spanish tailors ( worst ever ) that say " we are better than Savile Row and Naples "

http://www.lavozlibr...11/zapatero.jpg


http://estaticos03.c...adillos_1_0.jpg



How much is that crap




napoli.
From my untrained eyes the coat looks ok.

murtadza

#15 Schneidergott

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 10:31 PM

napoli.
From my untrained eyes the coat looks ok.

murtadza


I've seen worse. A lot worse. Although this "broad and straight shoulders" look is not to my taste. AFAIK, it's a style copied from the Americans in the 50's.

"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

http://www.dressedwell.net/ It's snarky, but fun.


#16 napoli

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 06:47 AM

napoli.
From my untrained eyes the coat looks ok.

murtadza



Man no offense, but the squared overarmoured contranatura shoulders and out of pitch double sized sleeves are the worst thing I have ever seen.

#17 napoli

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 06:47 AM

I've seen worse. A lot worse. Although this "broad and straight shoulders" look is not to my taste. AFAIK, it's a style copied from the Americans in the 50's.



Worse than that crap? I doubt it can exist but please ilustrate us. haha

#18 murtadza

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 01:23 PM

I've seen worse. A lot worse. Although this "broad and straight shoulders" look is not to my taste. AFAIK, it's a style copied from the Americans in the 50's.



I 've a lot more to learn.

murtadza




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