Jump to content


Photo

Skräddare Gunnar Bragde i Tranås


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 greger

greger

    Master

  • Senior Professional
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,500 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Washington, USA

Posted 02 February 2013 - 05:40 PM



A Swedish Skräddare, 1982. A Swedish tailor, 1982.

Don't understand Swedish langauge, but the video gives an idea for beginners how long thread is for general handsewing. Long threads get twisted, which is a waste of time. Worst is a knot in the thread- that really waste time! One gets to know exactly how long to cut the thread for a certain distant, so thread lengths vary. There are exceptions for very long threads like button holes, which uses very long threads. Other points is- don't pull the thread with the needle, bees wax is a lubricant for thread, use a thimble.

#2 LSHellström

LSHellström

    Umsie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 13 posts

Posted 02 February 2013 - 08:45 PM

Hello Greger

I am a Swedish designer and I can help you translate if you want?

#3 greger

greger

    Master

  • Senior Professional
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,500 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Washington, USA

Posted 03 February 2013 - 01:20 PM

Translating would be a lot of work unless it was spoken. You may if you wish. Thank you if you do.

#4 LSHellström

LSHellström

    Umsie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 13 posts

Posted 04 February 2013 - 08:05 AM

Hi
Its not necessary to translate word for word because they are not talking about the tailors craft.
If they were, that would take some time translate but unfortunately they are not.
I can give you a little summary on their conversation, because thats what it is, a general conversation about the tailors trade and the development of it.

First they talk about the tailors trade, the conclusion they make is that when Gunnar started, during the 1930s-40s it was the worst period for tailors and after that there was a little rise in the business. Ready to wear clothes was looked upon as a lower class of garment in the 1920´s when it began, but later it took over more and more.
Gunnar says that he always has had orders, enough to make a living. But if youre in the business for money you should look elsewhere, not to talk about the amount of overtime you have to put in, he says. There are no tailors left he concludes, except for some old masters doing stuff occasionally.
He gives praise to the old worsted wool fabrics, before the man made fabric made its appearance.
Nowadays you have no clue of what you get a hold of when it comes to fabric, in the old days pure wool, woven in Sweden was top of the line and fun to work with,he says.

One thing I find quite interesting is that Gunnar learnt his craft thru his grandfather, both Gunnars father and brothers were tailors. He say that his grandfather was the original type of tailor that walked from house to house, knocking on doors. My grandfather made the clothes in his clients houses, he says.

This is quite the opposite of peoples pilgrim journeys to those famous "Rows"!

By the way Greger, do you know that Swedish tailors wore known for being the best in the world? Scholte took swedish tailors to Savile Row to teach english tailors. The founder of Anderson&Shephard was a swedish tailor called Per Anderson.

Edited by LSHellström, 04 February 2013 - 08:07 AM.


#5 greger

greger

    Master

  • Senior Professional
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,500 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Washington, USA

Posted 04 February 2013 - 09:04 PM

Thanks for the summary. There have been times in history when there were too many tailors. The Welsh had to many tailors and some of them bounced around from house to house making all of the clothes for the house hold (read that from a guy who imported a lot of Welsh stuff). Granddad came from the Dalarna area. One of my cousins made the Dalarna wooden horses as a living. Granddad started tailoring before the age of six, as was required back then. The Swedes made a loose fitting coat that was unique and for that reason it was easier to teach Swedes how to make drape coats than other tailors. From my childhood I heard they were in in demand by Scholte and Anderson & Shephard when drape was hot.

As far as the best tailors in the world, can't speak for all Swedish tailors, Granddad certainly made the best I have ever seen, and becoming a farmer even the coats he bought and fitted for himself and shaped with an iron were far better looking than what I saw other tailors doing. I did see another tailored coat I thought was just as good, but very different. And another coat I saw was way better than mass produced coats, but the hand stitching was "grinning" (crooked teeth) it was all hand sewn (crooked stitching is an absolute no no). There is or was a picture when he started farming In Canada where the men stood in front of the school for the photograher who came to town; all the men seemed to be wearing the suit from the same manufacture, except for one. These suits looked fine and fit nicely. What granddad wore was intirely different and and put fit in a whole new catagory. Depth, width, lengths can transform a person from ordinary to extraordinary in the hands of a master. Sometimes I think people are born with that skill, along with the right lessons to develope the skill. I have only seen the work of a few tailors and most seem to lack imagination. Some "Customers" like the lack of imagination, as they don't want to stand out. I personally like top quality. It seems many of the pictures on the internet for the last ten + years of tailored coats look like mass-produced coats. Sure the fit is better, but they shouldn't look so bland. Anyway, to each their own.


#6 LSHellström

LSHellström

    Umsie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 13 posts

Posted 04 February 2013 - 10:09 PM

Hi Greger
So youre Swede then ;)
You must come and visit and make a suit for me(visiting tailor)!
First of all I would like to say that I have read a lot on this forum and your texts is very inspiring!

Interesting to hear about that the Swedes made drape cut coats, the tailor whom I ve been working with and made me a pattern for MTM service is not so keen on drape! He is 75 years old and has a tailoring school. He has made a pattern with a nice close cut chest which I really like.
If you want I can email you some pictures from a company he worked with in Gothenburg. They made RTW and MTM, but no fusing. They also made for Pierre Cardin in the 1960s.
I really like the 1960s cut, do you know the swedish word "lagom", The suits back then were cut "lagom", not too small, not too big.
What do you think about the swedish cut?

I totally agree with that right now we are in a massproduced,"all look the same" era and thats why I have started my own company, making a swedish cut suit,produced by an MTM factory.
But the sad truth is that the MTM market is a disaster, nobody wants to do sartorial work, just straight seams :( So I really have to struggle to find tailors that are actually tailors!
My swedish tailor, who made my pattern, told me about sourcing an mtm factory that he hoped that there were some old cutter/old tailor still working there or else I would be in trouble.
What do you think Greger? Should I give up?

Edited by LSHellström, 04 February 2013 - 10:12 PM.


#7 greger

greger

    Master

  • Senior Professional
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,500 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Washington, USA

Posted 05 February 2013 - 07:28 AM

Schneidergott knows about mtm as well as some others here. It sounds like where you live they have streamlined the process gutting the life of the garment for a quick profit. Fashions are ever changing. Customers wanted out with the old and in with the new. Here in the US so many young guys, nowadays, only want jeans and a T-shirt. Don't know about the Swedish 60s, but around here narrow trouser legs and lapels and white shirts were what people wore, unless you were old. By the end of the 60s it was heading into the 70s wide legs and lapels and blue shirts were acceptesd as was turtle necks. The turtle necks were so you don't need to wear a tie. The 70s was wild and zaney. The 80s boring. As history shows fashions are ever changing in each catagory and sub catagories. Sub catagories, for example would be banker suits to investor suits to general business suits to lesser images of importance of work close. After work clothes another bunch of sub catagories. White tie and black tie were both work and recreation clothes at places like golf clubs and Yatch clubs where million dollar deals were settled with a handshake. Then there are sports clothes sub catagories for horse riding football skiing and so on. And there are other catagories. Sadly the tailors that are left are basically the big city tailor specialist of suits and the rest of how to think about other clothes is gone, which is a failure of the world of tailors. Man made fabrics turned a lot of tailors away from keeping up. Many of the sub catagories of suits is gone.

The Swedsih loose coat was not a drape coat. Other tailors from around the world made loose fitting coats too, for farmers, lumberjacks, sailors and so on. The concepts of the loose Swedish coat and the drape were closer than the "farmers" coat, therefore, it was easier to teach the Swedes who knew how to make their loose fitting coats the concepts of the drape.

My advice to you is to learn from this old tailor. Just one project at a time. One is learn how to hand sew. Another project is trousers. Shirt is another. Over the years you learn how to make many kinds of coats from ancient to modern and trousers and so on. You will probably need to take a month or two off between some of these projects. After a project, such as trousers, you could, on the side, convert the pattern into jeans (0n the coth, not paper) and cotton twill shorts. The purpose for learning from him is to get a foundation for thinking. Technical is secondary and is also a very important foundation. Pay him some money for each project and maybe run some errands to make it worth his wihile. Your made to measure company I would not quit yet. You might want to expand it into other catagories of clothes.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users