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Slim fit or just too tight?


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#1 jeffrey2117

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Posted 30 March 2013 - 12:33 AM

Hello All,
I have noticed in the last year, 2012-2013, an unusually large increase of younger men in their 20's suddenly purchasing RTW suits, shirts with french cuffs, and a resurgence of waistcoats in my location.

I am happy to see such a large number of younger generation wishing to get out of jeans and upgrading their wardrobe to dress more presentable.

These young men are overwhelmingly requesting suits to alter as "slim fitted" suits. Most average wish for 16.5 inch hem width at bottom of trouser, many are requesting slanted cuffs also.

The issues I am seeing are for example a gentleman measures a 6 foot tall, 43 inch chest, 36 waist.

The men will to my location with a 38 short jacket and trousers for me to view because they are not sure why the garment does not seem to fit properly as they were expecting.

The normal reply is they are being told this is a slim fitted suit and to get one so many sizes less than your chest measure and shorter length.

This is a problem from local area and RTW purchased online from multiple locations that I have experienced.

I wondered if any others are experiencing or noticed a similar trend in style and requests from the young group?

Kind regards

Jeffrey2117
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#2 shirtmaven

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Posted 30 March 2013 - 12:45 AM

i HAVE BEEN MAKING SHIRTS SLIMMER AND SLIMMER..
My customers are somewhat a little ahead of the curve.
so some of my fashion forward customers are easing up a bit on the super fitted shirts.

as my friend, Vahram, at Mr. Ned says.
it is like trying to stuff 11 pounds of sausage into a 10 pound sausage bag.

#3 Terri

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Posted 30 March 2013 - 01:07 AM

My customers are somewhat a little ahead of the curve.


yes, I think that by the time this trend is being seen in the average departemtn store, it is in the process of being replaced by another fad, or at least an easing up.

The issues I am seeing are for example a gentleman measures a 6 foot tall, 43 inch chest, 36 waist.

The men will to my location with a 38 short jacket and trousers for me to view because they are not sure why the garment does not seem to fit properly as they were expecting.

The normal reply is they are being told this is a slim fitted suit and to get one so many sizes less than your chest measure and shorter length.

This is a problem from local area and RTW purchased online from multiple locations that I have experienced.


Yes, I have seen it all over the internet. It's too bad.
It happens all the time with women's wear. Selling an image/ideal that isn't flattering on 99% of people.

#4 Martin Stall

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Posted 30 March 2013 - 01:45 AM

My standard response: "If you wish to obtain fashionably tailored clothing, you must go to a fashionable tailor. I'm not willing to make you look like an overstuffed sausage."

Excellent BS-filter: either they get it and learn that fashion sells us an illusion, or they don't and they go away. In both cases, my problem is solved.
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Sure, I believe your work rocks, but... have you considered, how are you going to sell that stuff?

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#5 jeffrey2117

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Posted 30 March 2013 - 01:48 AM

i HAVE BEEN MAKING SHIRTS SLIMMER AND SLIMMER..
My customers are somewhat a little ahead of the curve.
so some of my fashion forward customers are easing up a bit on the super fitted shirts.

as my friend, Vahram, at Mr. Ned says.
it is like trying to stuff 11 pounds of sausage into a 10 pound sausage bag.



Hello Shirtmaven,

I have had two more customers arrive with RTW mail ordered, "Slim fitted" suits. The one looks passable in fit, but horribly botched sleeve alterations that cannot be corrected was done prior to shipping to customer.

I showed the customer the problem, he is sending back and now locally looking for new suit to wear for Easter!

The second customer's "slim fitted" suit, was a 36 short, he measures 40 chest and regular height.

Suit looks bad, like the stuffed sausage bag you describe.

The gentleman wants sleeved and jacket shortened 2 inches by tonight. I sadly informed him that I could not do that by today, nor recommended shortening of the jacket, as the length of was bordering short already.

There is a trend for the super fitted mens shirts for the last year.

The younger men all want shirts that look to be painted on themselves and shortened sleeves, with exception of the french cuffs.

I just received a customer who said his shirt is too loose. I could only take in his shirt 3 cm on each side as that was on his body itself. He was very happy with the fit, so that is what is important.

Hope you have a good holiday.

Kind regards

Jeffrey2117

Edited by jeffrey2117, 31 March 2013 - 01:43 AM.

"An intelligent man knows he is ignorant, a ignorant man knows he is intelligent".

#6 jeffrey2117

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Posted 30 March 2013 - 01:55 AM

yes, I think that by the time this trend is being seen in the average departemtn store, it is in the process of being replaced by another fad, or at least an easing up.



Yes, I have seen it all over the internet. It's too bad.
It happens all the time with women's wear. Selling an image/ideal that isn't flattering on 99% of people.


Hello Terri,

Yes, the womens gowns that are ordered and brought to me to correct look beautiful in the catalog for the 5'10 slim model.

I have three in here now, that need straps and length shortened for the 5'4 customers of average weight. Most of these gowns come at a 58" and 61" length and the ladies order at the size they think they are.

Kind regards

Jeffrey2117
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#7 jeffrey2117

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Posted 30 March 2013 - 02:04 AM

My standard response: "If you wish to obtain fashionably tailored clothing, you must go to a fashionable tailor. I'm not willing to make you look like an overstuffed sausage."

Excellent BS-filter: either they get it and learn that fashion sells us an illusion, or they don't and they go away. In both cases, my problem is solved.



Hello Martin,

I am very much in agreement with you.


Jeffrey2117
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#8 Martin Stall

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Posted 30 March 2013 - 02:21 AM

There's nothing wrong with tailoring along the lines of fashion, but it gets difficult if a client doesn't understand the difference between tailored clothes and fashion design.

It often means they have unrealistic expectations. If on top of that they try to force the tailor to do their bidding, unwilling to see reason... then what's the use? They won't be happy with the final product, so may as well not start.
Sure, I believe your work rocks, but... have you considered, how are you going to sell that stuff?

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#9 posaune

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Posted 30 March 2013 - 02:34 AM

I fully agree. It does not only look like a stuffed sausage - it looks like wearing my little brother (sisters) clothes. Terri did a nice article about the slim shirts.
As in the 80 th the ladies wore clothes without darts and big shoulder pads the gents oversizes shirts and trousers with 3 pleats this will be history some days.
lg
posaune

#10 jeffrey2117

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Posted 30 March 2013 - 03:37 AM

There's nothing wrong with tailoring along the lines of fashion, but it gets difficult if a client doesn't understand the difference between tailored clothes and fashion design.

It often means they have unrealistic expectations. If on top of that they try to force the tailor to do their bidding, unwilling to see reason... then what's the use? They won't be happy with the final product, so may as well not start.



Hello Martin,

Yes, I have a regular client who spoke to me about having a slim fitting suit made up. The gentleman is taller than me, around 6' 3" with broad build, short waist, long arms and legs, large pronounced hips and seat.

I spoke to him on the pro's and cons of this style for his figure and of the end resulting garment satifaction.

The gentleman agreed with my recommendation to stay with more traditional styles.

Kind regard

Jeffrey2117
"An intelligent man knows he is ignorant, a ignorant man knows he is intelligent".

#11 jeffrey2117

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Posted 30 March 2013 - 03:47 AM

I fully agree. It does not only look like a stuffed sausage - it looks like wearing my little brother (sisters) clothes. Terri did a nice article about the slim shirts.
As in the 80 th the ladies wore clothes without darts and big shoulder pads the gents oversizes shirts and trousers with 3 pleats this will be history some days.
lg
posaune



Hello Posaune,

I remember those days of the 80's very well. The ladies shoulder pads were intimidating to say the least!

For mens garments, I recall many hours narrowing the wide lapels and flared legs on mens suits from earlier times.

Many of the older customers during this time would request watch pockets to be put in their RTW new trousers. No one has requested a watch pocket from me since the late 80's.

The three pleated trousers are going away very quickly, I rarely see any of these anymore. Two pleat seems to be the popular style now.

Kind regards

Jeffrey2117
"An intelligent man knows he is ignorant, a ignorant man knows he is intelligent".

#12 Martin Stall

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Posted 30 March 2013 - 05:03 AM

Sounds like an excellent customer.
Sure, I believe your work rocks, but... have you considered, how are you going to sell that stuff?

http: under construction...

#13 Schneidergott

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Posted 30 March 2013 - 08:00 AM

It's kind of weird that mostly those who shouldn't wear skin tight really want to: Skinny guys and those on the brink of obesity and/ or those with figure problems (forward shoulders and hips, hollow back and such).
And then they are miffed when the vents or the lapels gape. It's so awful when you can see the front button pulling from the other side of the street...:Cry:

Sadly it's the same with women as well. When did strong thighs, big butts and "love handles" in overly tight outfits become the new "sexy"?:poke:

This is so hilarious... only in America!


"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

http://www.dressedwell.net/ It's snarky, but fun.


#14 jeffrey2117

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Posted 31 March 2013 - 12:40 AM

Sounds like an excellent customer.



Hello Martin,

The gentleman is excellent customer indeed, I have been dealing with him for 20 years plus.

The customer is very well respected, educated in Germany and his father happened to be a tailor! Perhaps that is why he believes my advice!

I wish you a good holiday weekend.

Kind regards,

Jeffrey2117
"An intelligent man knows he is ignorant, a ignorant man knows he is intelligent".

#15 jeffrey2117

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Posted 31 March 2013 - 12:51 AM

It's kind of weird that mostly those who shouldn't wear skin tight really want to: Skinny guys and those on the brink of obesity and/ or those with figure problems (forward shoulders and hips, hollow back and such).
And then they are miffed when the vents or the lapels gape. It's so awful when you can see the front button pulling from the other side of the street...:Cry:

Sadly it's the same with women as well. When did strong thighs, big butts and "love handles" in overly tight outfits become the new "sexy"?:poke:

This is so hilarious... only in America!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WvarUQef1KE


Hello Schneidergott,

I see these same things all the time from the men and lady customers.

Many people come to me that have multiple issues with their clothing because of their figures.

Square shoulders, barrel chest, hollow back, muscular shoulders and legs, larger weight issues, curvature of spine, low shoulder, etc..

I have had all the people mentioned inquiring about slim fitted suits.

Not related to my post, but interested figure issue.

I have an old retired warrent officer customer, who has the left leg extremely bowed and the right leg that is straight as an arrow!

Wish you a good holiday weekend.

Kind regards

Jeffrey2117

Edited by jeffrey2117, 31 March 2013 - 01:34 AM.

"An intelligent man knows he is ignorant, a ignorant man knows he is intelligent".

#16 tailleuse

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Posted 31 March 2013 - 02:09 AM

I can't play the video, but the first image is enough. I blame the "Fat Acceptance" movement.

To be clear, I don't believe in "body shaming," but that's obviously not a healthy weight and nothing is going to look good on you. Even normal weight people can have fitting problems.

A great tailor or dressmaker is like a shrink, s/he has the ability to *tactfully * guide the client from delusion to reality.

One of my projects is to make a computer mockup of my shape and coloring in order to have an idea of whether a garment will work.

Edited by tailleuse, 31 March 2013 - 02:10 AM.

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#17 jcsprowls

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Posted 31 March 2013 - 05:57 AM

It's a shame we have to keep coming back to the fit v. style debate.

Fitting is ensuring the circumferences fall at the appropriate lengths of the body and that the garment is technically sound (i.e. range of motion, etc.). Styling is illustrative (or, illusory) like: slimmer v. looser silhouette (/aka wearing ease), shorter v. longer hemlines, etc.

Each is integral to executing any given design. Where we get into a heap of trouble is when we try to merge the two together. They simply are not interchangeable. Mutually compelling, certainly... but, not interchangeable.

As a custom tailor, you have to decide where you fall on a continuum ranging from order-taker to designer. There's no crime in falling more to one side than the other. But, in the interest of customer service, it behooves you to make friends with tailors that have strengths you don't so you develop a referral network that puts the customer at the center.

If you're more a technician, pass the customer to a fashion-forward tailor, it's likely the designer subcontracts the execution, so ask for that work. If you're more a designer, a customer with proscriptive design requirements will only frustrate you - sketch up their vision, get their signature and pass him to the technician.
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#18 Schneidergott

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Posted 31 March 2013 - 06:07 AM

They actually offer those "body shapers" in Germany as well on certain shopping TV channels. Along with all those miracle ab shapers, that end up in the garage or on Ebay when buyers find out that 3x 10 to 20 minutes exercising per week doesn't make you loose weight, but the diet that comes with those machines.

They updated the size charts in Germany in order to get better fitting garments, but that is make belief. The problems won't disappear, because no each body is alike.

When well cut, a close fitting outfit can slim a silhouette that would otherwise look dreadful. But it's a difference between a garment that is made with all of the tailor's experience and skill and some RTW rubbish that is made the cheapest way possible following "average" measurements...
There are very few companies who take pride in the look and fit of their products.

"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

http://www.dressedwell.net/ It's snarky, but fun.





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