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Slim fit or just too tight?


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#73 jeffrey2117

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Posted 21 May 2013 - 02:14 AM

Hello All,

I just had a request from a young man for a slim fit two-piece suit.

He has athletic build, 5' 8" height, 38" chest, 30" waist, 35" hips.

Right shoulder low, protruding right shoulder blade, legs and arms different length, large thigh and calf muscles, bowed legs.

Needed it fairly quickly, with very low budget expectations! :Money Eyes:

I spoke with him on the reality of his request, he looked a bit disappointed, but will be back in a few days with a RTW for me to view.


Kind regards

Jeffrey2117

Edited by jeffrey2117, 21 May 2013 - 02:17 AM.

"An intelligent man knows he is ignorant, a ignorant man knows he is intelligent".

#74 Martin Stall

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Posted 21 May 2013 - 02:40 AM

"Sir, I have a question. You're asking me to make you look less handsome than you are, for less money than the price of a beautiful suit, and I have to stay up late to do it. Can you explain why I would be interested in that?"
Sure, I believe your work rocks, but... have you considered, how are you going to sell that stuff?

http: under construction...

#75 jukes

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Posted 21 May 2013 - 04:51 AM

Sir, in the fantasy world where you live, anything is possible, especially if it is for you.
However, in the real world, these things take a lot more time and money.

Some customers think they can have a Rolls Royce for bicycle prices.

Edited by jukes, 21 May 2013 - 04:53 AM.


#76 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 21 May 2013 - 06:34 AM

Stand your ground Jeffery, stand it firm!
Silly Cognoscenti, Drape is for windows!

#77 greger

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Posted 21 May 2013 - 12:48 PM

The young today have no idea about the quality of custom- therefore, time and money to pay for that time. But they can learn.

#78 jeffrey2117

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Posted 23 May 2013 - 01:47 AM

It's a shame we have to keep coming back to the fit v. style debate.

Fitting is ensuring the circumferences fall at the appropriate lengths of the body and that the garment is technically sound (i.e. range of motion, etc.). Styling is illustrative (or, illusory) like: slimmer v. looser silhouette (/aka wearing ease), shorter v. longer hemlines, etc.

Each is integral to executing any given design. Where we get into a heap of trouble is when we try to merge the two together. They simply are not interchangeable. Mutually compelling, certainly... but, not interchangeable.

As a custom tailor, you have to decide where you fall on a continuum ranging from order-taker to designer. There's no crime in falling more to one side than the other. But, in the interest of customer service, it behooves you to make friends with tailors that have strengths you don't so you develop a referral network that puts the customer at the center.

If you're more a technician, pass the customer to a fashion-forward tailor, it's likely the designer subcontracts the execution, so ask for that work. If you're more a designer, a customer with proscriptive design requirements will only frustrate you - sketch up their vision, get their signature and pass him to the technician.



Hello jcsprowls,

Very good reply, you make very good points. A referral network is always good thing, for yourself and your customers. I do not mind referring others if I am not able to take their order.

I have many customers in my area from all over the country. Many customers travel to their home states during the year. I use the list of Tailors posted on the Forum and refer to those with skills I am aware.

Perhaps a list of tailors could be made with their area or category of expertise listed, such as modern fashion forwards, slim fit, traditional business, theatrical and historical, ladies suits, gowns, leather, design, patternmakers, etc..

Thank you for the reply,

Kind regards

Jeffrey2117


"An intelligent man knows he is ignorant, a ignorant man knows he is intelligent".

#79 OJD

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Posted 24 May 2013 - 06:02 AM

The shoes always look like clown shoes when the trousers are that slim. I have 47 (eu) size shoes, it would look terrible on me!

#80 jeffrey2117

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Posted 24 May 2013 - 07:50 AM

Hello OJD, 

 

   I have the same footwear issues,  I wore that size shoe when I was 12 years old. 

 

Today I finished  alterations to shorten sleeves of a very slim fitted shirt for a customer, the sleeves had to be shortened 3.5 inches.

 

The customer thanked me very much and said that he had never had any shirt that ever fit him so perfectly.  He was very happy and will now bring me six additional shirts.

 

This is the response I like to hear from my customers.

 

I notice lately from customers new to custom tailored work, they seem a bit skeptical until  when complete, the look of amazement and satisfaction is a great thing to me.

 

Kind regards,

 

Jeffrey2117


"An intelligent man knows he is ignorant, a ignorant man knows he is intelligent".

#81 greger

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 10:25 AM

There are ways to lessen the hours in making a coat. The time to fit can be reduced to the few important fitting items such as balance, armholes in there correct place and usable sleeves. While this is not a polished fit tailors of the past made for many customers who couldn't pay top price. Half the pad-stitches would cut the time to half there. Pocket flaps with no pockets underneath. A welt sewn on with no pocket. Instead of a finely handstitched edge along the front machine sew it. Idea here is to make available for those with less money to have essentials of a custom garment by cutting out the unnecessary but still producing a fine garment without all the unnecessary refinement of the higher priced. After all, before rtw how did the tailors make for lower wage customers? This should not be frowned upon. Apprentices of the past made many clothes for lower class people while being pushed to make for the upper class when they are good enough, while some tailors always made for the lower classes. Anyway, your pay per-hour should not go down. Even the best made "unfitted" blazers because that was the style of the blazers and all lounges before that. Sending a "best" customer away and they might like the new tailor more and not come back, so the best tailors knew how to make cheap clothes and not send their best customes out. Of course really cheap customers went to really cheap tailors (and it showed). It is interesting to see the earlies photos; There were many not so good garments and a few that were expertly made (both are lessons to meet many needs).



#82 jeffrey2117

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 12:00 PM

Hello Greger,

 

    The old high quality men's stores downtown, used to order suits, made up in various sizes, styles, quality ranges made by various tailor companies in NYC who would sew their store name labels inside these suits.  The department store on the other end of the main street stocked suits that were more cost effective to the budget of mostly young men. 

 

I treat all of my customers equally, whether very poor or very wealthy, Private and General, I give the same best quality work and help those that need it as I may.

 

I had a poor feeble man, who is legally blind and in his mid 80's, have someone drive him over.  The gentleman brought a nicely tailored,close (slim) fitted three button, two piece suit that he had in his possession since 1963.  The jacket was in good serviceable outside condition, a button missing or damaged.  Interior  body lining was still very solid and in good condition. 

 

The main issue was the sleeve linings in both arms was torn, shredded and basically crumbling away.  This was a bit of a surprise, since the coat body lining needed nothing at all done too it.  I re-lined the jacket sleeves and had matching replacement button for him, had it cleaned and when he picked it up, I told him that it was already paid for. 

 

In contrast, the first customer today, drove up in new SUV, wished for a few slim fitted suits made, the gentleman wants to bring in his own fabric and offered to pay up to $200.00 per jacket and $300 per two piece suit. 

 

Kind regards,

 

Jeffrey2117


Edited by jeffrey2117, 30 May 2013 - 01:07 AM.

"An intelligent man knows he is ignorant, a ignorant man knows he is intelligent".

#83 greger

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 12:56 PM

Wasn't writing about freebies- those are just nice, but pay no bills. What I was writing about was bringing the cost down so more people can buy custom. Here in town (late 70s) one tailors said that starting price for a suit was $400, but if you wanted to pay more you could- into the thousands. If you have only one standard of quality which on is it? Rolls Royce, Cadilac or the cheapest toyota? Cheap is not shoddy- just lower cost. If you pick the highest then you have a lot of people who are have nots. The tailor above gave alot of people the choice to have custom made garments, which is also nice. So there are many ways to think about this.






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