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Trouser Department Apprentice


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#1 tailleuse

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Posted 18 November 2013 - 10:44 PM

Saw this on the Anderson and Sheppard blog.

 

"If you are a young, diligent, enthusiastic and committed about becoming a Trouser Cutter we would be delighted to hear from you."  Although ageism is alive and well in the U.S. a job notice by a reputable company would never list an age requirement.

 

 

http://www.anderson-...rentice-needed/

 

 

THE TROUSER DEPARTMENT – APPRENTICE NEEDED
Here in London the front door bell in the shop has felt like it hasn’t had a break since last Christmas. The year has flown by and we continue to be grateful to all our customers, established and new, for their trust and loyalty in what we do and make. 

In addition to our work in London, we are delighted to say we have had two more successful trips to the United States, one in May and the other in October. 

We have a specialist trouser department led by Head Cutter John Malone with Oliver Spencer cutting alongside him. Oliver started as an under-cutter in 2008 and, thanks to the steerage of John Malone, has become a highly respected Cutter in his own right. He now has his own customers, and has not only been cutting for a number of the London Collections: Men for Anderson and Sheppard, but has also been consulting on the ready to wear trouser collection for our Clifford Street Haberdashery. 

sep-71.jpg 

With ever expanding demand, we are looking to expand the department and are ready to recruit an additional member of the team. If you are a young, diligent, enthusiastic and committed about becoming a Trouser Cutter we would be delighted to hear from you. 

Please send your CV and covering letter to: 

Mr. John Malone, 32 Old Burlington Street, London, W1S 3AT 


Edited by tailleuse, 18 November 2013 - 10:45 PM.

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#2 Henry Hall

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 05:54 AM

How young is "young"? If I wear my jeans lower than my underwear, do a comb-over and lie about my age, I might have a chance.


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#3 tailleuse

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 10:28 AM

How young is "young"? If I wear my jeans lower than my underwear, do a comb-over and lie about my age, I might have a chance.

 

 

 

:LMAO:

 

Yesterday, I was reading another depressing story in the New York Times about middle-aged people who can't find work because of their age.


Edited by tailleuse, 19 November 2013 - 10:32 AM.

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#4 Henry Hall

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 01:05 PM

:blink:  I'm not middle-aged...I'm only 37. Depending upon the age of the observer it could be construed as either middle-aged or young (he says in hope).


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#5 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 02:40 PM

They need "successful trips to the United States..." to keep their head over water. :w00t:  How cheap is that?

Can they not fish in their own streets of London and get down the drain?


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#6 Learner

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 12:48 AM

It's government sanctioned ageism.  Employers can apply for an apprenticeship grant of £1500 for apprentices aged 16 to 24.  Additionally, they can also apply for funding to cover any training costs:  100% of any costs for an apprentice aged 16 to 18, and 50% of any costs for an apprentice aged 19 to 24.  Anybody over 24 is probably wasting their time by applying, but there's probably some anti-discriminatory legislature that prohibits them from actually including this useful piece of information in the job advertisement.


Edited by Learner, 20 November 2013 - 12:51 AM.

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#7 jcsprowls

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 03:26 AM

We have job training credits available in the US, too. Some industries (especially those traditionally learned on the job) are eligible for tax credits to offset some of the out-of-pocket (or, opportunity costs) associated with training.

 

The JTCs are age-banded in a similar fashion, though I don't remember the specifics. Beyond that, there are sometimes regional and local tax credits depending on sector, industry and zone/geography.

 

While these can be great savings strategies (when they happen "naturally"), they often require a lot more work (and, administration) than they are worth. That said, I know a lot of consultants who advise startup and expanding businesses to "leverage" these opportunities (some more ethically-questionable than others).

 

From an operating perspective, a facility staffed with >N% of the staff on a learning curve may be somewhat cheaper to operate. But, I have found these companies typically have a harder time competing for business against "tried-and-true" facilities. By comparison, they make many more mistakes, are less efficient and more costly to do business with in the long run.

 

While tax incentives may exist, they cannot be cited as the deciding factor for selecting one candidate over another. Employers must be in a position to defend their hiring selections if a Wage and Hour representative drops by to audit the application and interview records. Any appearance of impropriety has potential to expose an Employer to fines, penalties or sanctions.

 

If any comment is made, you might hear: "it's easier to train someone to do things our way than un-train all their bad habits and re-train them to be qualified to work, here."


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#8 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 08:20 AM

Imagine, you have to make trouseres all day long... what an exciting life that will be.


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#9 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 08:29 AM

We also must realise that this is an "entry-level" opportunity that might not appeal to older "apprentices". How many with an established family would be willing to work for say £11,000 a year for three years? It is the same with "over qualified" applicants, as businesses believe that these applicants will either be bored with the work or or after sometime feel they are not compensated accordingly. Conversely, for those with a genuine interest and motivation this would not affect their enthusiasm to learning a new skill. Unfortunately, there is the old standing bias of teaching an old dog new tricks and thus many established firms feel that after a certain age you are either untrainable or the amount of working years does not justify the expense and time.
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#10 tailleuse

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 06:18 PM

:blink:  I'm not middle-aged...I'm only 37. Depending upon the age of the observer it could be construed as either middle-aged or young (he says in hope).

 

Thirty-seven is still reasonably young by my lights, but I'm under impression that they're talking about someone in his or her 20s.  I've been reading the A & S blog for a while and all the apprentices seem to be well under 30.


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#11 Henry Hall

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Posted 21 November 2013 - 04:47 AM

Imagine, you have to make trouseres all day long... what an exciting life that will be.

 

At the moment it would be quite a welcome change from what I'm doing. In my youthful past I've stood outside in winter rain all day pouring sand and cement into a cement mixer. Believe me, making trousers all day is surely luxury in comparison.


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Each phenomenon which is taken up should be treated with as much thoroughness as possible at that standpoint... One thing at a time and that done well!

 

- Otto Jespersen (How to Teach a Foreign Language).


#12 tailleuse

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Posted 21 November 2013 - 11:19 AM

 

At the moment it would be quite a welcome change from what I'm doing. In my youthful past I've stood outside in winter rain all day pouring sand and cement into a cement mixer. Believe me, making trousers all day is surely luxury in comparison.

 

A tutor who had been trained in Russia told me that spent her first year sewing 2,000 (200?  it was an incredible number) of trousers.  She thought that the more varied curriculum of U.S. fashion design schools was more interesting.  But I couldn't help thinking, "Wow, I would REALLY know how to sew a pair of pants at the end of the year!"  I guess I like the idea of repetition more than some people.  :-)

 

 

 

Edited to add:

 

Sewing just one thing for a year would probably eventually drive me nuts. But I would love to be able to sew a garment flawlessly without instructions in the minimum amount of time it would take ME.  I don't think I'll ever be the fastest sewer.


Edited by tailleuse, 27 November 2013 - 03:14 AM.

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#13 cperry

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Posted 22 November 2013 - 03:02 AM

Those are beautifully done trousers (maybe due to repetition and craft secrets).  (Unless my eye is only used to seeing the ratty jean look.)  :)


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#14 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 22 November 2013 - 06:32 AM

 

At the moment it would be quite a welcome change from what I'm doing. In my youthful past I've stood outside in winter rain all day pouring sand and cement into a cement mixer. Believe me, making trousers all day is surely luxury in comparison.

 

LoL, I know what you mean. I had to learn the bricklayer trade in my youth, then I became a tailor and then an engineer. And I am still poor. :w00t:

 

I tell you the truth, to make a trouser is so what from simple, that it will become a pain after making 20 trousers. People want to waste their life learning to make a trouser in three years, whilst it takes maybe a 1 month to learn it? Then you learn the pattern making, that is also very easy when you understand the system, the rest is experience and looking in the books to learn all the derivations of postures or designs, whatever is needed. The point is, nobody wants to teach it to you that you learn it that fast because it is not in the interest of the tailors; otherwise, the apprentice would run a way very fast to a nicer place... Masters call it to make a long arm to the apprentice, learning little by little, in tiny steps. It needs to take a long time until the apprentice is ready.


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#15 greger

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Posted 27 November 2013 - 10:42 AM

Teaching a craft to fast takes time, which is money, and then they run off and you never get your moneys worth of teaching back, to the newb is basically getting free lessons.

 

A Henery Poole Golden Shears learner - it didn't take him long to run off to America and start his own business, so did Henery Poole lose money?

 

Another one from S&A did the same, except he stayed on SR.

 

With children they don't get paid until they actually can produce professional work. Still, time = money, and do tailors get much of that back?



#16 MANSIE WAUCH

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Posted 28 November 2013 - 07:07 AM

Teaching a craft to fast takes time, which is money, and then they run off and you never get your moneys worth of teaching back, to the newb is basically getting free lessons.

 

A Henery Poole Golden Shears learner - it didn't take him long to run off to America and start his own business, so did Henery Poole lose money?

 

Another one from S&A did the same, except he stayed on SR.

 

With children they don't get paid until they actually can produce professional work. Still, time = money, and do tailors get much of that back?

According to the Ad, they took on an apprentice in 2008 who is now a master cutter!

At that rate London could be swamped with trouser makers/cutters in no time.


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#17 tailleuse

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Posted 28 November 2013 - 02:12 PM

Teaching a craft to fast takes time, which is money, and then they run off and you never get your moneys worth of teaching back, to the newb is basically getting free lessons.

 

 

 

Isn't it a two-way street?  The apprentices probably aren't paid much and I assume do many menial tasks (that need to be done) to earn their keep.  Plus, simply being a trainee is extremely stressful.


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#18 tailleuse

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Posted 28 November 2013 - 02:13 PM

According to the Ad, they took on an apprentice in 2008 who is now a master cutter!

At that rate London could be swamped with trouser makers/cutters in no time.

 

Nice-looking trousers for everyone! :-)

 

More seriously, that's five years and the apprentice must have come in with several years of training under his/her belt.


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