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Jazz Age Tailoring


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#1 Alex Hills

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Posted 27 December 2013 - 08:03 AM

Hello Gents,

 

I've been looking into men's style in the late 1910's and early 20's. I was wondering what you make of the aesthetics? Are the illustrations very idealistic? To my eye they seem very interesting. Does anyone know whether these styles unique to a few american RTW brands (Hart Schaffner & Marx and Kuppenheimer ect), or could you of found something similar in the West End? 

 

beltsac.jpg?w=500

togs7.jpg

l-s4gg05oice5ntd.jpg

 

06-03-2010+11%3B43%3B05PM.JPG

 

06-03-2010+11%3B42%3B31PM.JPG

 

Letterstoson121.jpg

 

 

Letterstoson085.jpg

 


 

 

 


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#2 Alex Hills

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Posted 27 December 2013 - 08:13 AM

Maybe not totally unique to North America

1922smnr16001.jpg

 

1922smnr16002.jpg

 

1922smnr16003.jpg


Edited by Alex Hills, 27 December 2013 - 08:13 AM.

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#3 Terri

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Posted 27 December 2013 - 02:11 PM

Personally one of my favourite periods!
I think all illustrations are idealistic, to sell a certain silhouette that is optimum on a certain figure only, but there were always variations on the silhouette available for the short or not so slender figure. Most tailoring ordering books offered a selection of fits that could be applied to the newest available styles.

Edited by Terri, 27 December 2013 - 02:12 PM.

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#4 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 27 December 2013 - 05:26 PM

My favourite silhouette as well, though idealised do not think they stray that far from real life. The narrow shoulders, pinched waist and flared hips does translate well, as can be seen in early film and the photos above. Is it a silhouette that can be pulled off by anyone? No.
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#5 tailleuse

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 04:38 AM

I think it's a very attractive silhouette if you have the build for it.

 

Not my favorite style of those featured, but I've never seen a double breasted suit with such a high gorge. (Second page of the Das moderne Sakko issue.).


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#6 Alex Hills

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 10:17 AM

I think it was a really intereseting era for menswear. It seemed nearly every variations of pocket, buttoning, lapel, and back was available.

 

clothierandfunisherspringsummerfancystyl

clothierandfunisherspringsummer19202_zps

clothierandfunisherfancyspringsummer1922

 

clothierandfunisherfallwinter1917-182_zp

clothierandfunisherfallwinter1920-214_zp

clothierandfunisherfallwinter1920-21_zps

clothierandfunisherfallwinter1917-18_zps


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#7 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 07:25 PM

This was the era do the true sport coat. This is when we see leisure really taking hold to most levels of society, recent archaeological finds in Egypt and high profile explorations expeditions around the world made exotic travel in vogue and we see this reflection fashion. I think it would have been an exciting time in tailoring. Being able to produce garments with a multitude of varying stylistic and practical applications, unlike today.
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#8 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 29 December 2013 - 02:52 AM

Maybe not totally unique to North America

1922smnr16001.jpg

 

1922smnr16002.jpg

 

1922smnr16003.jpg

 

Very nice construction as fundament for new ideas, good for the one who speaks German.

You only have to draft this example in full scale and then steal and translate all the eases, lengths and forms into a modern system, and then, there you go!

 

KPH should be 172cm

Length: 1/2 Kph % 6

 

IMG_7255_zps324355ee.jpg


Edited by Der Zuschneider, 31 December 2013 - 09:39 AM.

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#9 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 02:09 AM

  1. 17550592

     


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#10 tailleuse

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 02:06 PM

I think it was a really intereseting era for menswear. It seemed nearly every variations of pocket, buttoning, lapel, and back was available.

 

clothierandfunisherspringsummerfancystyl

clothierandfunisherspringsummer19202_zps

clothierandfunisherfancyspringsummer1922

 

clothierandfunisherfallwinter1917-182_zp

clothierandfunisherfallwinter1920-214_zp

clothierandfunisherfallwinter1920-21_zps

clothierandfunisherfallwinter1917-18_zps

 

I love these variations.


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#11 Terri

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Posted 01 January 2014 - 12:02 AM

A time when designers actually "designed" and looked like they enjoyed doing so, and the people had fun wearing their clothes.
Tied in so much to the zeitgeist of the times ( if I may borrow the phrase!) :)

What does it say about today?
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#12 Alex Hills

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Posted 02 January 2014 - 07:19 AM

I totally agree! I'm hoping to revive some these style in my own work :)

Der Zuschneider I like the draft!

If anyone happens find anything similar, i'd like to see it.


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#13 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 02 January 2014 - 12:40 PM

The draft is cool, was like resurecting of 1922 here, LOL.

 

Today, the draft would not work anymore. The calculation has an upright position, small back and wide chest, and the armskye is too small, only for little bony arms. But I checked the skirt and waist ease. I pinned the poster on the wall now to enjoy the old times.


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#14 MKennys

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 11:12 PM

Your pictures seem somewhat relevant to the suits of Mid 90's. However, at the turn of the 20th century, a distinctly American suit style emerged among the world’s fashions: the sack suit. Modeled after a French coat popularized during the 1840s, the sack suit was loosely-fitted, giving its wearer a soft silhouette. By the late 1950s, a sack-style suit was the standard for American business attire, despite it’s original French intention, extreme informality.


Edited by MKennys, 22 January 2014 - 11:13 PM.

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#15 greger

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 08:25 AM

It seems like from the 80s on suits and such became monotonous as the hippies really had attacked the art of tailoring and left it. The attack actually started in the 60s with the anti corporate mantra and from the 70s the damage was done. Musicians are artist and they attacked another group of artist - tailors. Tailoring was heavily tied to the corporate world and not enough to other cultural parts of living. Mass produced clothes were tied to the other parts of the culture. A lesson in this is that tailors should fulfill the whole job of cultural needs with clothes and not just about only corporate clothes. Another reason for the attack is the cost is what rich can pay for and the poor can't. Another reason I think has to do with these kinds of clothes styles were worn out as history shows change change change as we are still seeing the same basic clothes from over a hundred years now. Around 1610 to 1640 were lots of changes, so a hundred years with out change is quite amazing. In the past the best tailors pursued to make what ever they made better than any body else. Today so many tailors only make a few things thinking that is all there is to tailoring having for gotten their whole art- the other clothes. Specialist should not forgit the rest of the art.


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#16 tailleuse

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Posted 25 January 2014 - 02:02 PM

It seems like from the 80s on suits and such became monotonous as the hippies really had attacked the art of tailoring and left it. The attack actually started in the 60s with the anti corporate mantra and from the 70s the damage was done. Musicians are artist and they attacked another group of artist - tailors. Tailoring was heavily tied to the corporate world and not enough to other cultural parts of living. Mass produced clothes were tied to the other parts of the culture. A lesson in this is that tailors should fulfill the whole job of cultural needs with clothes and not just about only corporate clothes. Another reason for the attack is the cost is what rich can pay for and the poor can't. Another reason I think has to do with these kinds of clothes styles were worn out as history shows change change change as we are still seeing the same basic clothes from over a hundred years now. Around 1610 to 1640 were lots of changes, so a hundred years with out change is quite amazing. In the past the best tailors pursued to make what ever they made better than any body else. Today so many tailors only make a few things thinking that is all there is to tailoring having for gotten their whole art- the other clothes. Specialist should not forgit the rest of the art.

 

 

I assume it's hard for anyone who aims to be at the summit to do a lot of different things.  The techniques are different, you need different tools, you have to arrange to have access to very different kinds of cloth and haberdashery items.  You also have to have a flexible aesthetic, too, if you're sewing men's and women's clothes because women usually want a different fit and lighter tailoring.  But you're right, it is good not to over-specialize.


Edited by tailleuse, 25 January 2014 - 02:02 PM.

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#17 greger

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 01:47 PM

It seems in the past clothes were more complicated. Todays, jeans and t-shirts is mostly it, which any tailor can do. Ski and snowboarding and mountaineering clothes are more complicated, but when looking at the past 50 and beyond there were many fashions changing rapidly and tailors did those if asked. It seems a lot of how to think about clothes has disappeared from the tailors world. If you don't know how to think about clothes then making them is harder and doing it well is even more of a challenge. Tailors who were not taught about popular clothes are not able to teach the next generation either. It is nice to be a specialist if that is what one wants to do and lives where that is possible, but that is no excuse for not teaching the rest of the trade, not to mention that one might need to dabble in the rest to support oneself as time changes.


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#18 Faya

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Posted 23 February 2014 - 09:43 PM

I've printed those drawings from "The Clothier and Furnisher". I love it. Thanks.

Laurence John, who is inspired by the 1920's as well, has made some beautiful garments.
http://laurencejohn.blogspot.tw/
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