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The waistband curtain: necessary or not?

Waistband curtain Techniques

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#1 Terri

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 01:40 AM

I'd like to hear your thoughts on whether you construct trousers with a waistband curtain or not and what your reasons are for your choices.
Have you always done so, do you feel it performs a function nowadays or not?
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#2 Terri

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 01:47 AM

I would add here that for the theatre we tend to dispense with it, as we need a simplified process for both construction and alterations.
We don't cut open back darts so it is not an issue of trying to cover any raw edges on the inside of the trouser.
The commercial waistbanding that we have in stock (the one with the rubber inset) has a very small amount of "curtain", so small as to not perform that function either.
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#3 jcsprowls

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 04:18 AM

I'm a fan of "better" RTW construction with a fused mock curtain (that is alterable) with a fly shield liner for the majority of contemporary styles.

 

That said, I think how much curtain and which materials depends on the style of the trouser. If the leg and seat is "blousey", then I'd put a deeper curtain in, since it helps to improve the hang off the waist (much like a sleevehead).


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#4 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 04:29 AM

When you produce a traditional fish tail trouser, I would use a curtain. For normal trousers you can use waistbanding. The darts in the trousers are ironed to one side, and not cut open, so they don't look bad inside.


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#5 Rory Duffy

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Posted 05 February 2014 - 11:24 AM

I'd like to hear your thoughts on whether you construct trousers with a waistband curtain or not and what your reasons are for your choices.
Have you always done so, do you feel it performs a function nowadays or not?

 

 

I would add here that for the theatre we tend to dispense with it, as we need a simplified process for both construction and alterations.
We don't cut open back darts so it is not an issue of trying to cover any raw edges on the inside of the trouser.
The commercial waistbanding that we have in stock (the one with the rubber inset) has a very small amount of "curtain", so small as to not perform that function either.

 

Terri,

 

Feel like you just answered your own question there.

It’s more of a traditional styling detail than a function. Personally, I do both. In my handcrafted trousers, which are traditionally hand-made, they contain a curtain. On the bespoke trousers, I have a personalized waistband similar to that used in modern trousers. The curtains play a function of covering the inlays on the trouser tops- designer trousers don't allow inlay there.

Really, when it comes down to it, it’s a matter of expense. Curtains take longer to put in and are usually hand-sewn. Making it more difficult to alter when the pants have been made-up. The waistband you described is easier to adjust after the trousers are finished.

Regarding the cutting of the darts, I am unaware of a trouser-maker that does this. Pressing the dart open and flat is efficient.

 

Regards,
Rory Duffy


Edited by Rory Duffy, 05 February 2014 - 02:34 PM.

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#6 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 05 February 2014 - 05:09 PM

Never seen a dart cut open either, was taught to always box the dart. Lays nice and flat.
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#7 greger

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Posted 06 February 2014 - 10:46 AM

Heard - cut and pressed open. Pressed over or boxed leaves 3 layers instead of 2.



#8 Terri

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Posted 06 February 2014 - 10:48 AM

I never cut darts open myself, I was mentioning it because the old texts sometimes indicate that technique, and there are people learning from those older books.


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#9 greger

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Posted 06 February 2014 - 10:59 AM

A cut dart may not work well before the fitting, but after the fitting....

 

A slanted dart also works better for sitting so one tailor says that I read.



#10 Rory Duffy

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Posted 09 February 2014 - 01:45 PM

I press the dart open and not over.
Have a heavy duty dry iron which really helps, using a domestic or steam would prove more difficult. But am sure their are tailors who can do it effectively.

It's better no to cut it incase you have to move it. Had a client who gained quite a bit of weight over the Christmas. His seat was regular and felt the angle was correct, so I let it go at the side seam undersides and then moved the darts.
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