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Sleeve cap ease is bogus?

sleeve cap ease

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#1 Nula

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 03:47 AM

Has anyone else seen this:

 

http://www.fashion-i..._ease_is_bogus/

 

Any thoughts on this?

Does anyone here take the ease out completely in the sleeve caps of ladies jackets?


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#2 jukes

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 06:01 AM

The photo of the coat clearly has fullness in the sleeve cap, otherwise it would not stand off the shoulder seem as shown. The illustration of the scooped front of sleeve is terrible, guaranteed you would not be able to lift your arm without the whole coat lifting if the sleeve was cut as shown.
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#3 jcsprowls

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 06:17 AM

She's right. But... context is important.

 

Be sure to read that entire series. Kathleen's point is that a properly drafted set-in jacket sleeve does not require ease.

 

Ease is often added as slop to the pattern so the designer has extra material to "fit out".

 

JefferyD has an article about a topcoat he made for a private client. He made an educated guess how much ease to add to the pattern. When he basted it up, he made a design decision and shows highlights of the remedy. That's a representation of real-life.

 

That said... these decisions need to be sorted before the pattern is finalized, graded and distributed to the production floor.

 

When I draft, I eliminate all ease from the pattern so I can ensure the shapes are accurate. I then add controlled ease back into the pattern based on all the "guts" I'm putting into the coat. I then sew a sample, assess the overall design, make adjustments and - possibly - re-sew another sample.


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#4 Nula

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 06:18 AM

That's what I thought too, Jukes.  It looks like there is some fullness there.  I have never tried using no ease before (except in knits, of course). 

It looks like there's no ease across the back shoulder line either, unless the back and front shoulder plaids match up accidentally.



#5 jukes

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 06:29 AM

If you have sleeve head wadding/felt fitted there has to be ease in the sleeve head.
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#6 Nula

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 06:55 AM

With a high sleeve cap you have to ease it into the scye to some degree to fit the parts together, because of the two different arcs.  Maybe you'd have room for wadding because of that, even without added ease.  

 

It would be interesting to make up a jacket with one of each sleeve and survey the results - see which looks and feels better.

 

I agree, JC.  I prefer to work from moulages.  If you have problems there, they aren't going to get any better later!

 

I wouldn't say ease is a fallacy in all instances.  I think one has to keep an open mind on both ends of the spectrum.


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#7 jukes

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 07:01 AM

A high sleeve cap with enough ease for the sleeve head, would tend to be short across the crown, the ease needs to be added horizontally.
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#8 jcsprowls

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 07:10 AM

I don't make moulages or toiles or muslins, per se. I make samples until I get it right. Hopefully as few as possible because I get paid by the [right] piece.


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#9 Nula

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 07:28 AM



I don't make moulages or toiles or muslins, per se. I make samples until I get it right. Hopefully as few as possible because I get paid by the [right] piece.

For me, it seems like 3 is the magic number!  But I do like to work from a consistent base(for RTW)  It just seems to save a lot of headaches, though interesting discoveries can be made along the way.



#10 Claire Shaeffer

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 12:22 PM

Fasanella's expertise is ready-to-wear and many sleeves in rtw have no ease in the cap, but not this one. It definitely has ease.

 

Matching involves the cut, the layout, and the sewing. This is surprisingly well done for a rtw jacket.

 

Most professional tailors can add the ease back after cutting. This isn't possible for the less experienced so an amount of ease is added at the outset, but it's not cast in concrete that you can't remove it before setting the sleeve permanently.

 


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#11 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 07 June 2014 - 01:31 AM

For instance a men sleeve need as much ease horizontal as the armhole can bear because a men arm is more muscular and needs room. A woman sleeve does not need so much ease as the arms a thinner.

 

A men sleeve can also be shorten 5 - 10mm in the sleeve cap, what then creates the 'Heberolle' and you can use this extra ease then horizontal for a more comfortable fit.


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#12 uchimata

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Posted 07 June 2015 - 05:50 AM

All sleeves need ease if they are cut for arms that are Hanging normally straight by your sides, because your biceps stand a way from your shoulder. The more your arms are lifted away from your sides the less ease is required. Try it an a mannequin- a sleeve with no ease that hangs vertically will be flat against the mannequin as there is no arm for it to go round.

Edited by uchimata, 07 June 2015 - 05:51 AM.

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