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Shirtmaking video


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#1 Schneidergott

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Posted 24 August 2009 - 07:05 AM

This is a video I found today (lots of handwork involved):


"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

http://www.dressedwell.net/ It's snarky, but fun.


#2 Todd Hudson

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Posted 27 August 2009 - 01:19 PM

thx for posting. On shirts, I've only used a thimble and needle for attaching buttons. Now I can see where else I might use my hands.

I wonder what would be a appropriate mark-up on the shirt (beyond the extra hours) if I offered a "hand-stitched details" option to my clients. If someone wants an extra collar, I can just cut and machine a new one using the same skill set I used on the rest of the shirt. If the client wants the "special touch", what is it worth? Maybe this should be an additional revenue stream for me.

Of course, it will be hard to sell because I'll have to say "Likely to fall apart more quickly than machine stitching...".

#3 Kate XXXXXX

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Posted 14 November 2009 - 12:28 AM

It shouldn't fall to bits if properly hand stitched. I have a completely hand stitched shirt in my possession that was made in the late 1860's and shows little sign of ware at the seams. Looks like an Arts & Crafts movement type garment: beautifully stitched. I have pix on Live Journal, if you are interested.

#4 Sanguis Mortuum

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Posted 16 November 2009 - 11:11 PM

It shouldn't fall to bits if properly hand stitched.


Indeed, I think in-fact a back-stitch is supposed to be stronger than a machine stitch.

#5 greger

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Posted 17 November 2009 - 07:21 AM

Indeed, I think in-fact a back-stitch is supposed to be stronger than a machine stitch.



What was it, 1980s or 1990s? The two earthquakes. One in Japan and the other in CA. Japan had built massive strong without give and CA built less massive but with give (flex). So much of that that which couldn't shift went down in Japan. While in the US in CA, while that that could shift, stood. So too in sewing. Lock stitch has no flex. The hand sewn back stitch has flex. The hand sewn shapes to the body better and is more comfortable, because it is less ridged. One old tailor says that a proper hand stitch is loose, but not so loose the stitches can get snaged.
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#6 Kate XXXXXX

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Posted 17 November 2009 - 08:42 PM

The shirt I have is sewn with running stitch. The felling is amazing...


http://pics.livejour...0k6xyk/s640x480

http://pics.livejour...0k0e38/s640x480

#7 Linda

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Posted 18 November 2009 - 12:55 PM

Can anyone tell me what weight pattern 'paper' was used in the shirtmaking video?
Linda

#8 jcsprowls

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Posted 18 November 2009 - 03:24 PM

That's called "fiber board" or "colored rope" paper. That specific thickness is hard to find stateside. Most of our suppliers are recommending .030 plastic sheets.
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#9 greger

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Posted 18 November 2009 - 07:08 PM

The shirt I have is sewn with running stitch. The felling is amazing...


http://pics.livejour...0k6xyk/s640x480

http://pics.livejour...0k0e38/s640x480



Is that really a running stitch or a half back stitch? And then there is the back and fore stitch, which is a back stitch and then a running stitch and then a back... You might see on the otherside what it is. If you pull on it you will know real quick which it is.

#10 Linda

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Posted 19 November 2009 - 05:53 AM

That's called "fiber board" or "colored rope" paper. That specific thickness is hard to find stateside. Most of our suppliers are recommending .030 plastic sheets.


Mahalo!

Linda

#11 Kate XXXXXX

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Posted 19 November 2009 - 09:20 AM

Is that really a running stitch or a half back stitch? And then there is the back and fore stitch, which is a back stitch and then a running stitch and then a back... You might see on the other side what it is. If you pull on it you will know real quick which it is.


It looks like a running stitch: exactly the same on both sides for the whole seam length as far a I can see. NOT that I am going to pull on it to experiment, you understand. Not with a shirt that is 150 years old.

There are some other interesting things with this shirt, and with the other items I have. I'm hoping to take patterns from them all when I complete the conservation grade laundry process, before packing them for archiving.

Edited by Kate XXXXXX, 19 November 2009 - 09:21 AM.


#12 Che Pasticcio

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Posted 22 November 2010 - 02:45 PM

It looks like a running stitch: exactly the same on both sides for the whole seam length as far a I can see. NOT that I am going to pull on it to experiment, you understand. Not with a shirt that is 150 years old.

There are some other interesting things with this shirt, and with the other items I have. I'm hoping to take patterns from them all when I complete the conservation grade laundry process, before packing them for archiving.


Thanks for the links. I'm sure it's a lovely garment to admire. That wouldn't happen to be a featherweight, would it? I found one at Goodwill for $25 and it's what I've been using but I can't seem to get the tension to work properly. Any luck with yours?

#13 tailleuse

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Posted 22 November 2010 - 02:54 PM

Indeed, I think in-fact a back-stitch is supposed to be stronger than a machine stitch.


That's what I was told, although it's hard for me to believe if a very small machine stitch is involved.

Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#14 jcsprowls

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Posted 22 November 2010 - 05:32 PM

I think you should test advice before you decide what to incorporate.

Seam integrity is comprised of several factors: thread strength, stitch density and bursting strength of the substrate (fabric).

Contrary to popular belief, fabric does not need to be nailed together.

Edited by jcsprowls, 22 November 2010 - 05:40 PM.

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