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#19 DesertElephant

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Posted 11 September 2014 - 04:40 AM

 

Well, there's a lot I don't know. :)

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#20 OJD

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Posted 11 September 2014 - 04:53 AM

I don't know if this is to any help to you but at home I have used the kind of paper you use to cover the floor while painting. As painters would use. Some of the brands have a white plastic backing which make it incredibly stable and easy to draft on. It's wayyyyyy much cheaper than real manila paper as well. Comes on a 50-70 meters roll and is usually available in 1-1.5 meters width.


Edited by OJD, 11 September 2014 - 04:54 AM.

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#21 hutch48

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Posted 11 September 2014 - 05:30 AM

Something I have been able to buy for years from E & M Greenfield is rolls of white tissue paper which is about the same weight as the old commercial dressmaking patterns the ladies used to buy when home sewing was more popular. The size I have is 36 inches wide and it seems to handle most things I have ever needed to make.

 

I tend to use carpenters pencils to sketch out the profiles I am after, keep a range of steel rulers from 12 inch to 36 inch for the straight lines and draw the curved sections by hand. Once I have the shape done to my satisfaction I use a black ink pen to do the final outline. The tissue is reasonably soft and very easy to cut out but it is also translucent which makes it very easy to trace another pattern from an existing one and this is really useful when you need to modify a pattern in that you can just trace the old one then tweak the tracing to get the changes you are after.

 

As I don't make large numbers of items, I generally pin the pattern to the fabric then cut out very close to the edge in much the same manner as old style dress making as I am a lot faster doing it this way than marking out the garment with chalk then cutting to the chalked outline. This technique suits small production runs which in my case do not have an alteration allowance but if you are designing garments of a more traditional nature you are probably better off using the commercially available stiff paper that will handle using it as a guide for marking out with chalk.

 

I have seen this distinction done commercially, prototype in an easy to modify medium then when the garment design is fixed, make a durable pattern that will last some years. If you are making single unique garments either for customers or yourself, the easy to cut and modify method is probably closer to what you need.


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#22 jcsprowls

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Posted 11 September 2014 - 08:45 AM

 

Sometimes it's hard to know what's belongs in the realm of legend.

 

I concur. But, as a rule... when advice starts to sound a bit mythical, I think it prudent to test before putting into practice.

 

With one or two exceptions, the teachers I've had were very dogmatic, woe betide s/he who asked for an explanation of why one method was better than another. 

 

It's a bad habit every teacher struggles with. Time constraints (as you say) are one contributing factor to cutting right to "cuz I said so!"

 

Picture, if you will tyring to true a pattern with 20 or more darts, pinning them closed on the table, and trying to redraw the seam line! I was drawing inside a paper shell!

 

Oh yes... corner cases always prove the "rule" don't they? I once cartridge pleated a skirt onto a bodice. And, I run into a situation similar to what you describe.

 

Because we were only making a few for a show, I didn't make a proper pattern. I ripped lengths of fabric on-grain, cartridge pleated about 90% of it (east/west of CF) and then gathered a section in the CB to allow for alteration. I broke with "conventional wisdom" because it simply didn't serve the corner case.

 

If I had to make the pattern so a factory could make this style in quantity, I'd have to stay the course and continue the long way around. Thank goodness CAD tools are really quite good about opening fullness in sundry ways. This specific skirt piece could (now) be patterned in minutes versus hours by hand.


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#23 Faith

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Posted 11 September 2014 - 10:09 AM

...the old commercial dressmaking patterns the ladies used to buy when home sewing was more popular.

 

OT: Oh how I miss those days. Nowadays many of my old patterns either don't fit me or qualify as period costume. So I go looking at the modern selection of such patterns and, same as with the RTW items in the stores, I have trouble finding anything I actually like. Then I try to draft a simple straight skirt and run into considerable problems in making up. I'm convinced Whife's DaCLG was not written with corpulent figures in mind. Back to drape. (and no, I am NOT a window. hehe)


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If most women are not 5 feet 10 inches 120 pounds, why do these unrealistic models dominate the runways?


#24 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 11 September 2014 - 05:30 PM

Jcsprowls I have had on my mind to ask you about the process of recording changes on fitting to a draft etc. It seems this maybe a good place to do so.

 

Do you have any particular protocol for the process of:  Measure, draft, fit, rewrite and adjust??

 

I am guessing that the oaktag is the final for any given garment? what extra information do you tend to record on each stage?

 

I am doing a blatant copy of some capri pants for a client and trying to fit them a bit better than the original.


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#25 DesertElephant

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Posted 12 September 2014 - 02:11 AM

I don't know if this is to any help to you but at home I have used the kind of paper you use to cover the floor while painting. As painters would use. Some of the brands have a white plastic backing which make it incredibly stable and easy to draft on. It's wayyyyyy much cheaper than real manila paper as well. Comes on a 50-70 meters roll and is usually available in 1-1.5 meters width.

 

I'll definitely take that under advisement.  Thanks! 


Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy, but not express'd in fancy; rich, not gaudy; for the apparel oft proclaims the man.

-Polonius, Hamlet, Act 1, Scene 3


#26 Henry Hall

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Posted 12 September 2014 - 04:10 AM

I also use the paper OJD mentioned. 80m from the building supply mart and far cheaper.This is white on one side and black on the other so it can be turned either way to show up the outline better on light/dark cloths.


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Each phenomenon which is taken up should be treated with as much thoroughness as possible at that standpoint... One thing at a time and that done well!

 

- Otto Jespersen (How to Teach a Foreign Language).


#27 gramountoto

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Posted 12 September 2014 - 04:16 PM

Here is a very interesting thread regarding drafting paper etc :

 

http://www.cutterand...ic=1572&p=13181


Edited by gramountoto, 12 September 2014 - 04:16 PM.

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#28 DesertElephant

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Posted 13 September 2014 - 01:11 AM

gramountoto, This is actually the very post to which I was referring.  I only read it an hour after posting my question.  But, I still got a lot of great suggestions from the Gang anyway, which I greatly appreciate.

 

I really love the knowledge, helpfulness and community I've found here.


Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy, but not express'd in fancy; rich, not gaudy; for the apparel oft proclaims the man.

-Polonius, Hamlet, Act 1, Scene 3


#29 DesertElephant

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Posted 13 September 2014 - 01:13 AM

Something I have been able to buy for years from E & M Greenfield is rolls of white tissue paper which is about the same weight as the old commercial dressmaking patterns the ladies used to buy when home sewing was more popular. The size I have is 36 inches wide and it seems to handle most things I have ever needed to make.

 

I tend to use carpenters pencils to sketch out the profiles I am after, keep a range of steel rulers from 12 inch to 36 inch for the straight lines and draw the curved sections by hand. Once I have the shape done to my satisfaction I use a black ink pen to do the final outline. The tissue is reasonably soft and very easy to cut out but it is also translucent which makes it very easy to trace another pattern from an existing one and this is really useful when you need to modify a pattern in that you can just trace the old one then tweak the tracing to get the changes you are after.

 

As I don't make large numbers of items, I generally pin the pattern to the fabric then cut out very close to the edge in much the same manner as old style dress making as I am a lot faster doing it this way than marking out the garment with chalk then cutting to the chalked outline. This technique suits small production runs which in my case do not have an alteration allowance but if you are designing garments of a more traditional nature you are probably better off using the commercially available stiff paper that will handle using it as a guide for marking out with chalk.

 

hutch, this is a great idea, but I'd need something sturdy, that won't budge or tear under weights, as I'll be leaning heavily on them nit being able to utilize my Right hand/arm with any measure of precision.

 

I am quite certain that this was a helpful suggestion for others though.


Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy, but not express'd in fancy; rich, not gaudy; for the apparel oft proclaims the man.

-Polonius, Hamlet, Act 1, Scene 3


#30 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 13 September 2014 - 09:07 AM

At a pinch I found a roll of brown paper for wrapping up postal items. Its not as wide as you would like for a Jacket or Trousers (they use up a lot in a vertical direction) but they got me started. Its about 40 inches.


Edited by Schneiderfrei, 13 September 2014 - 09:11 AM.

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#31 DesertElephant

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Posted 13 September 2014 - 09:40 AM

Well, I guess it would work for drafting waistcoats or bow ties.

Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy, but not express'd in fancy; rich, not gaudy; for the apparel oft proclaims the man.

-Polonius, Hamlet, Act 1, Scene 3


#32 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 14 September 2014 - 02:36 AM

Texas Art Supply, brown paper roll, 91cm wide, 50$


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#33 gramountoto

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Posted 14 September 2014 - 03:51 AM

This is where I find my cardboard for production pattern. For free :sorcerer: .

 

http://static.parast...f200f69.jpg_256


Edited by gramountoto, 14 September 2014 - 03:54 AM.


#34 Henry Hall

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Posted 14 September 2014 - 09:32 AM

I once drew out a pattern on the back of a roll of wallpaper because there was nothing else.


Each phenomenon which is taken up should be treated with as much thoroughness as possible at that standpoint... One thing at a time and that done well!

 

- Otto Jespersen (How to Teach a Foreign Language).


#35 hutch48

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Posted 14 September 2014 - 10:50 AM

There is the odd item I do make patterns for that have to be durable, external pockets are one of them and clear plastic sheet that is reasonably stiff does the job well in this instance. I save any bits of clear packaging I get so I have some material to make these small patterns. You can cut it out with any junky pair of scissors (don't use your good ones on plastic), mark out button placements with a small hole that I personally make with an Exacto knife and when you need to make out a pocket, you just place it on the fabric and draw around it with your tailors chalk.

 

I don't remember what the plastic type is that you find in packaging but sheet polycarbonate is very similar and a bit tougher so if you needed to make durable patterns that can be used for a long time that have the advantage of being clear, some 0.5 mm polycarbonate sheet would be a good candidate.


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#36 tailleuse

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Posted 17 September 2014 - 06:35 AM

There is the odd item I do make patterns for that have to be durable, external pockets are one of them and clear plastic sheet that is reasonably stiff does the job well in this instance.

 

I had a teacher, a professional pattern maker, who put her personal slopers on to a translucent plastic medium.  If you are need to center a print, or look at print placement, it's tremendously useful.


Edited by tailleuse, 18 September 2014 - 05:23 AM.

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