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You Lose Ten Clients not Just One


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#19 greger

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Posted 11 October 2014 - 03:54 PM

Agreed with that. That happens with every cut sooner or later. It is probably worst with the Internet and drape happens to be popular at present. If the customer is workable you can show them a number of kinds and there values. Otherwise throw the customer out.

#20 Martin Stall

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Posted 11 October 2014 - 06:32 PM

It's not the drape that's the problem. In fact, drape is a total non-issue in itself. The problem is that of a client who micromanages the tailor. Usually, these have read up on the internet, and a bad sign of this is when someone drops the term 'drape' into the conversation.

 

Very true.


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#21 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 11 October 2014 - 11:57 PM

I know of a tailors who have 'fired' clients.

 

Usually types who think they know more than the tailor because they read something about drape on the internet. If a client talks about drape think about firing them.  :diablo:

 

That will be correct, it means the client will micromanage the tailor because the client made himself smart. On the other site, not every tailor can do drape because, he cannot source the correct canvas to hold the drape in the front because drape demands more structure than what those soft tailored, unpadded coats can provide, or it is not his style with the pattern idols he uses.

Those clients are mostly trouble makers and also don't like to spend much money for a suit.


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#22 Schneidergott

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Posted 12 October 2014 - 06:18 AM

Actually, some customers go to great lengths to have a drape suit made! And they spend big for that, too! Also, it's a minority that want to wear drape, what you mostly see these days are those super-tight suits, that look horrendous.

 

The trouble is that only a few of the possible drape (or soft tailoring) customers do understand what a drape cut is. All the other ones want to buy in because they think it's special and will make them stand out.

It's no big deal to get away with a poorly fitting/ made suit when you have a rock solid reputation, but if you are a tailor without that and one of those over-demanding customers (probably looking for a bargain since they cannot afford to travel to London or Naples) think they didn't get what they think is drape, you are pretty much screwed.

Proper "drape" is very hard to achieve and it goes more into it than having the right canvas and/ or putting it on the bias. I'd say that drape demands more structure than what those soft tailored, unpadded coats can provide. Plus, never confuse drape with just uncontrolled amount of cloth that is working against your body.

 

That said (and hopefully ending an upcoming drape discussion), I have been told  6 or 7 years ago by a market researcher that you loose 100 possible customers from one grumpy one, while you might only gain 10 customers from a happy one. Although I guess the figures might be different now that we have so many bloggers (and re-bloggers) that make money from boosting certain companies or tailoring firms.

 

So I think it's time for tailors to step up and have a look at marketing that is relevant to their target group and what they are doing. The trouble is that many marketers have no understanding of how personal a tailor - customer relation can be.

If only there was somebody out there who had an insight in our trade...


"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

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#23 Martin Stall

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Posted 12 October 2014 - 06:44 AM

Actually, some customers go to great lengths to have a drape suit made! And they spend big for that, too! Also, it's a minority that want to wear drape, what you mostly see these days are those super-tight suits, that look horrendous

 

Looks like an overstuffed sausage. Fashion can be a terrible, terrible thing.


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#24 Martin Stall

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Posted 12 October 2014 - 06:44 AM


So I think it's time for tailors to step up and have a look at marketing that is relevant to their target group and what they are doing. The trouble is that many marketers have no understanding of how personal a tailor - customer relation can be.

If only there was somebody out there who had an insight in our trade...

 

You're right! If only there was a marketer who understands tailoring from the inside out...

 

But where does one find such a person?


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#25 tailleuse

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Posted 12 October 2014 - 07:55 AM

 

You're right! If only there was a marketer who understands tailoring from the inside out...

 

But where does one find such a person?

 

There must be people emerging with skills like that.  I've seen it in other fields. For example, friend of mine is a psychologist.  She saw a consultant who helped her revamp her website and I assume is providing suggestions on how to build business.  She's very good at what she does, but self-promotion is a different skill set.


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#26 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 12 October 2014 - 10:23 AM

 

You're right! If only there was a marketer who understands tailoring from the inside out...

 

But where does one find such a person?

 

Even the person who publish the http://www.gentleman...ette.com/about/ is not a tailor... all those blogs are useless!


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#27 napoli

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Posted 12 October 2014 - 12:08 PM

 

Even the person who publish the http://www.gentleman...ette.com/about/ is not a tailor... all those blogs are useless!

 

 

That blog is one of the worst, not only is awful, tacky, bad tasted, hyped, but the ignorant owner recommended his ibook over the rest. A bad tasted narcissistic who lives out of the reality. Weirdo!



#28 Schneidergott

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Posted 12 October 2014 - 06:42 PM

Herr Schneider only does what all the other bloggers and re-bloggers do: Write about stuff that people are interested in, because that's what brings traffic to their site and ad revenue to make a living.

 

And it's hard work, too, because there isn't really much left to write about, especially something genuinely new. So it's basically re-inventing the wheel on a regular basis.

 

I also wouldn't call them useless, because they show a trend regarding what customers are interested in. So, as a tailor, you should know about colour combinations, pattern mix and so on. Even though you might find some of the stuff tacky and distasteful.


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"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

http://www.dressedwell.net/ It's snarky, but fun.


#29 MANSIE WAUCH

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Posted 13 October 2014 - 02:47 AM

I know of a tailors who have 'fired' clients.

 

Usually types who think they know more than the tailor because they read something about drape on the internet. If a client talks about drape think about firing them.  :diablo:

 

I would have thought, if you are in business as a bespoke tailor, you would make the suit according to the customer's requirements. That is what the word 'bespoke' is supposed to mean. If a tailor cannot make a 'draped jacket' he cannot be much of a tailor. Surely, any tailor would have knowledge of past and present styles?

 

If a customer annoys the tailor by his supposed knowledge of fashion, he can always refuse to make him a suit, but that would not be good for business if the customer has many friends who he possibly could recommend if he got customer satisfaction in the first instance.


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#30 Martin Stall

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Posted 13 October 2014 - 03:17 AM

Sure, but having knowledge of something isn't the same as knowing how to do it effectively an successfully.

 

As for declining, that can actually be the best choice for both customer and tailor, depending on the situation. The relationship between the two individuals is extremely important - that is part of what bespoke means. If there's argumentation involved, persuading, "I insist" and "don't want to" - then the tailor might well make the sale but the chances of it turning out a success are slim. Success meaning great suit, happy customer, referrals, tailor working at top level...

 

If it doesn't look like it's going to be that kind of terrific experience, I'd say the tailor better not take the gig. It's hard to understand for customers how bloody involved it can get, trying to get something right, the way the customer wants it. We've all had situations where we work into the small hours, because that's how seriously we take things - and in some cases, we know that even though the suit is going to turn out spectacular, this particular customer won't be as satisfied as the suit merits.

 

That kind of job? Best not take it.

 

The goal is to create fine clothes and thrilled customers - not to just grab any sale we can get.


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#31 Sator

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Posted 14 October 2014 - 10:59 PM

 

I would have thought, if you are in business as a bespoke tailor, you would make the suit according to the customer's requirements. That is what the word 'bespoke' is supposed to mean. If a tailor cannot make a 'draped jacket' he cannot be much of a tailor. Surely, any tailor would have knowledge of past and present styles?

 

If a customer annoys the tailor by his supposed knowledge of fashion, he can always refuse to make him a suit, but that would not be good for business if the customer has many friends who he possibly could recommend if he got customer satisfaction in the first instance.

 

All true, but a tailor should be allowed self-respect. It takes over a decade of training to become a tailor, and if you get a client who is truly overbearing and thinks they know everything after reading a thing or two on the internet, it is reasonable to ask for the client to go elsewhere. These people are impossible to please and are prima donnas who complain endlessly about every non-issue. If you find yourself chalking up an alteration/putting in a pin at a fitting saying "does that look better to you Sir/Ma'am"..."yes, you like that?" when in fact you haven't done anything, then it is time to ask if the client is worth the bother.



#32 Martin Stall

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Posted 15 October 2014 - 12:06 AM

 

 If you find yourself chalking up an alteration/putting in a pin at a fitting saying "does that look better to you Sir/Ma'am"..."yes, you like that?" when in fact you haven't done anything, then it is time to ask if the client is worth the bother.

 

:Big Grin:


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#33 posaune

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Posted 15 October 2014 - 03:43 AM

....does that look better to you Sir/Ma'am"..."yes, you like that?" when in fact you haven't done anything, then it is time to ask if the client is worth the bother.

made my day!

lg

posaune


Edited by posaune, 15 October 2014 - 03:44 AM.

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#34 hutch48

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Posted 15 October 2014 - 10:32 PM

Walmart may have exactly what you need.  :Big Grin:


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#35 greger

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Posted 06 November 2014 - 05:42 AM

Have to remember the customer lives in his/her peer group and that is what you are making for. The more you know about the peer group the faster you get done. How many peer groups are coming to you, 5, 10, 20?

Some talk about the golden age. What does that mean? Some will say the 20s and others the 40, or 50s and so on. Each person has their own opinion the golden age and what parts of it. And what young person wants a golden age?

Understanding the customer is much faster even if the customer doesn't. Show different types of drape by pinning showing drape the opposite of zenith and ask them which one they like most. Between the tailor and customer things can get quite inventive and blow the socks off of other tailors and your customers peers. Make it fun.

Edited by greger, 06 November 2014 - 05:47 AM.

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