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The cosak suit.


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#1 carpu65

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Posted 17 October 2014 - 10:56 AM

I have found this interesting topic in the coatmaker section:

 

 

http://www.cutterand...p?showtopic=826

 

Well,I'm very interesting to the history of men cloting,so i can not resist to make some comment.

About the stiff & flat lapels,is possible that what we see as a mistake or a false step was at the time simply part of the look.

In other words,this was not "your father suit",so the lapels were flat like sheets of a rocket,and this was good.

More the lapels were narrow,so the stiff effect,terrible with broad lapels,were more clean and minimalist.

I think that is the best explanation,otherwise,as Sator said,in a very expensive ad campaign would find a better tailor for the "cosak" suit.

 

Now a question.

How much was really bad this Cosak Dormeuil?

The blend 55% terylene 45 % mohair is nasty sweaty and unbreathable,or the 45% natural mohair is enough for a decent breathing?

 

 


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#2 Learner

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Posted 18 October 2014 - 04:45 AM

I'm no expert, but I've always loved the styles from the mid-1960s.  In the 1980s I used to wear "vintage" clothing like this pretty much all the time, so here are my observations:

 

"Terylene" is just polyester - Polyethylene terephthalate.  In the 1960s, as Sator's post and the Dormeiul adverts imply, there wasn't the pathological dislike of anything other than "natural fibres" that there is nowadays.  Terylene wasn't used because it was cheaper than wool, it was used because it had desirable qualities.  Polyester fabric would keep a pressed-in crease better than wool, yet at the same time would be more resistant to creasing and wrinkling in wear.

 

I think the idea that synthetic fabrics are always "unbreathable" is a bit overworked, myself.  I find modern lightweight cloth, even if it's 100% wool, to be far inferior in this respect, and my theory is that it's actually a result of the lightness:  Because the cloth is woven from finer yarns that are spun from finer fibres, there's less "air space" between the yarns.  I  had plenty of old suits that quite proudly proclaimed themselves to be made from "Wool and Terylene  by ICI" that could be worn in perfect comfort on a sunny summer afternoon, whereas almost all of my modern suits leave me feeling uncomfortably clammy in even moderately warm temperatures.


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#3 carpu65

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Posted 21 October 2014 - 09:57 AM

More,i think that the most important thing is the blend-

Exist in a good blend a right point in which benefits of polyester outweigh the disadvantages.

More i don't see why a poly/wool blend can not be loose weave for breathing.

I suspect that "cosak" cloth could give a very good suit,(ehmm,,fully canvanassed and not fused :Praying: ) better of many modern lightweight all wool....



#4 greger

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Posted 21 October 2014 - 11:45 AM

Silk is not stretchy or shrinky and coats are made of that so why not poly?



#5 Learner

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Posted 22 October 2014 - 04:22 PM

Indeed.  Here's another interesting article that Sator posted in the "Warp and Woof" forum:

 

http://www.cutterand...p?showtopic=500

 

I wonder what the "Scandinavian technique" is - or was - exactly?



#6 carpu65

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Posted 23 October 2014 - 06:12 AM

Ah Sator! :bye: :search:



#7 Schneidergott

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Posted 31 October 2014 - 08:49 AM

Polyester fibers were a big thing in Germany in the late 50's and during the 60's. A blend of 55% to 45% was common and the brand names for the polyester fibre were Trevira®, Diolen® and Dralon®.

In the UK it was the said Terylene. I don't know how big the differences were, AFAIK each was just patented by a different company (like Dupont, Bayer, BASF).

 

What I understood from the texts describing them the cloths made this way were open weave and the polyester fibre allowed a lighter cloth that was also durable.

Trevira ® cloths were and still are around in Germany and were the choice for Uniforms and other garments that needed to be durable. Most common weave was and is the heavy twill.

Some of the better cloths didn't actually look or feel like they had polyester in them. But that was then, now the cheap, blended stuff looks and feels terrible and makes your hands sweat by just touching them.


"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

http://www.dressedwell.net/ It's snarky, but fun.


#8 Schneidergott

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Posted 31 October 2014 - 08:51 AM

Ah Sator! :bye: :search:

 

Sator is busy, doing a lot of work in the background to keep this forum alive and well.


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"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

http://www.dressedwell.net/ It's snarky, but fun.


#9 yellowman

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Posted 05 November 2014 - 07:25 PM

Most common weave was and is the heavy twill.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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#10 Henry Hall

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Posted 01 December 2014 - 10:52 AM

I have a suit made from Trevira® (45% - 55% wool) and it has that feel of older cloths with a bit of weight, but it's not as pliable as wool. I've worn it mostly in the winter and the breathability has never been a problem.

 

I was wearing this suit on New Year's eve  about six years ago and I fell into some sturdy rose bushes (drunk), but you wouldn't know it from the suit. It has no damage at all, that Trevira® is durable stuff!


Each phenomenon which is taken up should be treated with as much thoroughness as possible at that standpoint... One thing at a time and that done well!

 

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