Jump to content


Photo

Drafting Trouser Patterns Directly onto the Cloth


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 Sator

Sator

    Administrator

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,932 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sydney, Australia

Posted 30 August 2009 - 11:50 PM

There are some tailors who always draft their patterns directly onto the cloth - even coats. Here Archibald Whife discusses the practice of drafting trousers patterns directly onto the cloth without a paper pattern.




Gustav Mahler (1860-1911): "Tradition ist die Weitergabe des Feuers und nicht die Anbetung der Asche."

"Tradition is about passing on the flame, and not the worshipping of ashes"

#2 jruley

jruley

    Apprentice

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 145 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:(USA)

Posted 31 August 2009 - 01:15 AM

Everyone who reads here probably knows this, but the layout as shown won't work if the material has a pronounced directional "nap". You'd have it going the right way on the fronts and wrong way on the backs, or vice versa.

#3 Der Zuschneider

Der Zuschneider

    Master

  • Senior Professional
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,981 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:TX, Houston
  • Interests:- German Cutting Systems
    - Modern Tailoring by German Semi-Traditional Standards

Posted 22 November 2009 - 02:07 PM

Don't draw the pattern directly on the fabric, it is to dangerous for beginners, and it is inexact cheap work. The pattern schould go with the straight grain as well.

Schneidern heisst, viel Wissen, viel Arbeit und keine Kohle im Sack, dafuer aber viele Kunden, die alles besser wissen.  :Big Grin:


#4 jcsprowls

jcsprowls

    Pro

  • Senior Professional
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,030 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Washington DC Metro Area

Posted 22 November 2009 - 02:34 PM

You'd have it going the right way on the fronts and wrong way on the backs, or vice versa.

For cutting the one-off, you're right. In fact, it's probably safe to say any fabric with directional, plaid or stripe should not be done this way. Actually, that eliminates about 85% of the fabrics used in menswear. I would rather interpret that as the method shouldn't be used, period. It's gimicky, unreliable and, as Zuschneider states, sloppy.

Have I done it? Oh yes. Do I still do it? Hell no.
___________

Dir, Product Development

web: http://www.studio9apparel.com
portfolio: http://www.behance.net/studio9apparel

#5 jukes

jukes

    Pro

  • Senior Professional
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,003 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:London Suburbs

Posted 19 December 2009 - 09:57 PM

I see no problem with drafting straight on the cloth if you know what you are doing.
Far less sloppy and gimicky than cutting from and adjusting a block pattern, then telling the customer his suit is Bespoke.
The best cutter i have ever seen bar none cut direct from the cloth 90% of the time, for both ladies and men.

#6 Josef

Josef

    Umsie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 21 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:midwest USA
  • Interests:Tailoring Men's suits
    history of clothing

Posted 24 March 2010 - 11:13 PM

I see no problem with drafting straight on the cloth if you know what you are doing.
Far less sloppy and gimicky than cutting from and adjusting a block pattern, then telling the customer his suit is Bespoke.
The best cutter i have ever seen bar none cut direct from the cloth 90% of the time, for both ladies and men.


You know it funny I tailor Jacksonian clothing and all this talk of drafting the garment right on to the cloth made me think. I have always drafted the pattern using the methods of the period the garment was being made for on to brown paper and saved it. If you read "The Tailor's Friendly Instructor" by J Wyatt 1822, "The Tailor Complete Guide" 1796, "Taylor's Instructor" by James Queen and William Lapley 1809 and lastly "The complete Guide to Practical Cutting" by Edward Minister & Son 1853 they all talk about drafting the garment right on the cloth. They were not so concerned with making sure the nap and or the pattern run in the same direction, what they were concerned with was saving material and using the lest amount as possible. It interesting to see how things have changed so much 1796 to present.
Joe
Josef Kleffman




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users