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Style of German Men

german style typical different reasons why men dress like

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#19 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 23 January 2015 - 12:33 AM

I think that the world does definitely seem to be descending into a more uniform dress. Don't forget, Coronar Junkee, it isn't just the clothes but how, shall we say, national identities hold themselves. "Attitudes" are not just frames of thought but also physical postures and gestures.


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#20 CoronarJunkee

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Posted 28 January 2015 - 12:30 PM

That's a very Bourdieusian line of thought you're having here, Schneiderfrei, with your postures and gestures. Incorporated (social) knowledge. Although I'd be careful with terms like "national identities" anyways. I'd just add that while we might be aesthetically influenced by media, we are still very much socialised by the people we actually deal with. And that also involves peer pressure and thus an education in what is OK to do (and to wear) and what isn't. So, the uniformisation everybody is talking about might also be related to the geographical, social and financial mobility of individuals (and thus - if we hit the economic side of that aspect -, these socialisation processes might be highly influenced by the economic landscape of a particular country, it's gross product, import taxes, welfare, individual annual earnings etc.).

 

I wouldn't want to study that kind of topic. Bourdieu is of great help though, at least insofar as he problematises different clothing (and behavioural) styles varying in different socioeconomic groups.

 

I'll go to bed now :)



#21 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 30 January 2015 - 05:56 PM

I am very sorry but I missed your reply for a couple of days.  Any resemblance of my comment to Bourdieu is completely coincidental but most interesting. Thank you for bringing my attention to him.  My impressions are based mostly on my experience of studying Tai Chi and observation of life through that kind of lens.

 

But yes, the increased mobility and exposure through media including the internet to a uniform (and probably American) social display must have a massive influence on the current market.

 

And also just the massive ability to have whatever you want.


Edited by Schneiderfrei, 31 January 2015 - 09:06 AM.

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#22 tailleuse

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Posted 31 January 2015 - 07:25 AM

Funny to See that the trends of Florence... also showed up in a small shop in Cologne last week

 

img_23081.jpg?w=678&h=904


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#23 SPOOKIETOO

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Posted 31 January 2015 - 09:55 AM

Ok -its official...I'm old.

I truly do not believe I could be attracted to a man in one of those scarves.
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#24 Henry Hall

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Posted 31 January 2015 - 11:02 AM

They all have their hands in their pockets, probably to keep the trousers up in case they fall any further below the hips.

Why do they always roll up the trouser bottoms in clothing displays? You don't really see all that many people who roll up their trouser bottoms. Not normal people anyway.
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#25 tailleuse

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Posted 01 February 2015 - 11:51 AM

Ok -its official...I'm old.

I truly do not believe I could be attracted to a man in one of those scarves.

 

Every now and then The Sartorialist runs a photo of a man dressed like that who looks great. It's usually an Italian or Japanese man who's thin, handsome, and probably in the fashion industry.  The look can be pulled off by a very few.


Edited by tailleuse, 03 February 2015 - 08:00 AM.

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#26 cperry

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Posted 02 February 2015 - 01:18 AM

I'd have to agree with the both of you. I'm all for colorful accents for men, but it's the scarf of that fancy that seems to belong in the ladies' domain right now. Fancy scarves and equestrian style boots are all over the place in my little corner of the world.

I get the attempt there, though, as it's been said that in traditional or classic attire, a man only gets to express himself with his tie, shoes or maybe his vest.
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#27 greger

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Posted 02 February 2015 - 09:00 AM

Understand why you guys think as you do. Sometimes this is how change comes. Beau Brummell certainly went against the sensibilities of his day and age. But, would you rather be wearing what everybody else was wearing. Once people saw what he was wearing for a while the sensibilities changed. Also, those tailors who made those "funny looking" clothes were most likely scoffed, mocked, etc. But, they did it anyway. How many tailors did Beau go to only to be laughed out of their shops? It became those who wore, what had once been proper, recent past, were now laughed at. Has life changed? I was told not to judge the future of clothing. All those who scoffed Beau were wearing it. And the silly tailors who mocked were making and wearing it.

The picture above is just fun clothes. Those who enjoy those clothes respect them. The winds of change are good sometimes though at first sometimes we think not.

Edited by greger, 02 February 2015 - 09:13 AM.

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#28 SPOOKIETOO

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Posted 02 February 2015 - 11:05 AM

I don't mind change. Change is good. Change is interesting.

But just because something is "different" - doesn't make it good.

The scarves in the window seem nothing more than a "Madonna" marketing tactic. She was interesting and different in the beginning and when the novelty wore off - she just went for the shock value.

While I can appreciate that there may be a minute number of people that would enjoy this look it reminds me so very much of the fashion photography that began in the nineties with the stick-thin emaciated models in Zombie makeup and Zombie poses that usually detracted from being able to fully assess the garments being worn.

The window would have been just as eye-catching with one scarf - leaving the viewer able to better appreciate the garments on display.
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#29 greger

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Posted 02 February 2015 - 01:08 PM

Never said many catch on. Probably 80% doesn't. A person can only try. It is usually not just the view. Clothing is intertwined with so much more. The picture above is only for one season. If you think that is bad men have certainty worn worse.
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#30 Schneidergott

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Posted 02 February 2015 - 07:30 PM

A lot of what you see in window displays depends on the personal tastes of the decorators or the people who are responsible for buying those products for that company.

 

Lets just say that some are more open to colours than others...

 

Also, there is a lot of money to be made with accessories. In some shops the scarfs are as expensive as a proper garment, even though they cost less to produce.


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"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

http://www.dressedwell.net/ It's snarky, but fun.


#31 cperry

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Posted 03 February 2015 - 02:16 AM

That is true.  For the artistic value as a window display, I like it.  It is cheerful.

 

I was given a finely woven wool scarf, made up in Canada, by the Egli's Sheep Farm, from my step-father-in-law at Christmas.  I enjoyed learning about their story, and I have greatly enjoyed wearing it, with its cheerful colors.  A lightweight wool scarf is really nice to wear, and takes the chill away...as is needed here (especially this week!).

 

It is a good accessory, and I wouldn't take it away from anyone!


Edited by cperry, 03 February 2015 - 02:17 AM.

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#32 tailleuse

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Posted 03 February 2015 - 07:53 AM

I'd have to agree with the both of you. I'm all for colorful accents for men, but it's the scarf of that fancy that seems to belong in the ladies' domain right now. Fancy scarves and equestrian style boots are all over the place in my little corner of the world.

I get the attempt there, though, as it's been said that in traditional or classic attire, a man only gets to express himself with his tie, shoes or maybe his vest.

 

 

The main reason I posted the photo was because it referenced Germany. None of the previous discussions seemed to contemplate this kind of style. :-)


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#33 tailleuse

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Posted 03 February 2015 - 07:58 AM

Understand why you guys think as you do. Sometimes this is how change comes. Beau Brummell certainly went against the sensibilities of his day and age. But, would you rather be wearing what everybody else was wearing. Once people saw what he was wearing for a while the sensibilities changed. Also, those tailors who made those "funny looking" clothes were most likely scoffed, mocked, etc. But, they did it anyway. How many tailors did Beau go to only to be laughed out of their shops? It became those who wore, what had once been proper, recent past, were now laughed at. Has life changed? I was told not to judge the future of clothing. All those who scoffed Beau were wearing it. And the silly tailors who mocked were making and wearing it.

The picture above is just fun clothes. Those who enjoy those clothes respect them. The winds of change are good sometimes though at first sometimes we think not.

 

 

It's a tricky thing. I'm aware that my eye often has to be retrained to appreciate new styles and it adapts. But then there are trends that I thought were hideous at the start, during, and afterwards.  I thought 1980s clothes were ugly. I didn't have any alternative as to wearing them, but I am not like, "Oh, look at those hideous things we thought were so attractive long ago" -- I KNEW at the time they were ugly.  :)   If only I'd known how to sew and fit and to research styles from the past. If only the Internet had existed. If only I'd had time. If only....


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#34 greger

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Posted 04 February 2015 - 06:48 AM

Women's clothing in the US was dreadfully awful in the 80's. In the 70s fat young ladies were complaining that the clothes made them look fat and that wasn't fair and the young guys would pass them over when dating. Women's clothing industry tried to do something about that. And the 80's was the result. Did the idea work? Today, some models are under age and unhealthyly skinny. The history of women's clothing, some of it is rather unreasonable.
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#35 cperry

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Posted 04 February 2015 - 07:43 AM

I was in junior high and high school in the 80s. I gag looking at what we wore, and also the big hair. But there was always the classics too. What is it.......There are three types of people, those fashion forward, those indifferent about fashion, and those who love the classics.

Interesting on the women complaining about the clothes making them look fat.

Clothing appropriate to and flattering the person's body type.......a great idea.
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#36 Schneidergott

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Posted 04 February 2015 - 08:30 AM

 

Interesting on the women complaining about the clothes making them look fat.

 

I seems those days are gone. Now you can see a lot of seiously overweight women (and some men as well) wearing inappropriate garments. Skinny trousers, dresses that seem to be at least 2 sizes too small and, of course, leggings.

I wonder if that slight see-through effect is meant by design or caused by the body stretching the fibers to the max... :poke:

 

When I was working in Düsseldorf and had to commute every day I always had a good look at what people were wearing. Sad truth is, that hardly anyone was dressed in a manner that actually flattered their stature or teint. The clothes were either light, medium or dark grey. Very little blue, and even less people wearing garments made from beautiful cloths in more vivid colours.

There are still a few full bespoke tailors in Düsseldorf and at least 6 MTM companies I know of, not to mention high-end RTW shops for both, women and men. And yet all you can see is a sea of dark grey or black suits or costumes. Along with hoodies, jeans, flip-flops, beige shorts, shirts and sandals.

 

BTW, that is still the summer colour of German men and women at retirement age: beige or light beige from head to toe, every now and again a "spritz" of colour in the form of a pale blue (polo) shirt or a skirt with a colourful, small print.


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"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

http://www.dressedwell.net/ It's snarky, but fun.






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