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Style of German Men

german style typical different reasons why men dress like

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#37 greger

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Posted 04 February 2015 - 08:56 AM

For me colors are the way most times. Spent so much of my time looking at colors. So many paintings are lively with colors. How many black, grey and white paintings do you see. The earth is full of colors, why dress abnormally? Be part of real nature. If you are going to paint some green moss do you pick grey, or green? Maybe too many cities have grey buildings, sidewalks and streets, so they dress those colors.

The idea of those women's clothes was to have loose fabric hanging so they didn't look fat or thin. Nowadays, fat means triple the fat of the 80's. Life is to easy. Some of us need to be put out behind the plow.
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#38 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 04 February 2015 - 12:51 PM

LOL, my suits are all too small now. I need a 2.0 cm stomack dart in the side pocket.


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www.berlinbespokesuits.com

#39 greger

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Posted 04 February 2015 - 02:11 PM

Just head over to the next state, they have alligator wrestling over there. In no time flat you will fit again in your old suits.

Edited by greger, 04 February 2015 - 02:12 PM.

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#40 cperry

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Posted 05 February 2015 - 08:39 AM

[quote name="Schneidergott" post="40561" timestamp="1423002653"]
I seems those days are gone. Now you can see a lot of seiously overweight women (and some men as well) wearing inappropriate garments. Skinny trousers, dresses that seem to be at least 2 sizes too small and, of course, leggings.
I wonder if that slight see-through effect is meant by design or caused by the body stretching the fibers to the max... :poke:
 
When I was working in Düsseldorf and had to commute every day I always had a good look at what people were wearing. Sad truth is, that hardly anyone was dressed in a manner that actually flattered their stature or teint.
------------------
--There have been a few jokes going around on that topic.... horrible but so true.....as in what's the difference between two big box shoppers? Oh about 40 lbs. So much corn syrup and other easy calories doesn't help.

On the up side, I keep seeing places where people are discouraging the black tights look--like you look like you forgot something--and thinking about more tailored styles, if you'd like to look more slim. The Post Bulletin of Rochester, MN, had both of those ideas on their fashion/life page in the past week or so.

I also had a fun conversation with a young high school aged guy, who said, "Dressing up used to be an art." He had done a speech at school on various ways to tie a tie, and he was sporting a tie which I think he said was tied in a Martinelli manner.

I suppose it's good to remember people are not linear. :)

Edited by cperry, 05 February 2015 - 08:59 AM.


#41 cperry

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Posted 05 February 2015 - 09:38 AM

 

I seems those days are gone. Now you can see a lot of seiously overweight women (and some men as well) wearing inappropriate garments. Skinny trousers, dresses that seem to be at least 2 sizes too small and, of course, leggings.

I wonder if that slight see-through effect is meant by design or caused by the body stretching the fibers to the max... :poke:

 

When I was working in Düsseldorf and had to commute every day I always had a good look at what people were wearing. Sad truth is, that hardly anyone was dressed in a manner that actually flattered their stature or teint. The clothes were either light, medium or dark grey. Very little blue, and even less people wearing garments made from beautiful cloths in more vivid colours.

There are still a few full bespoke tailors in Düsseldorf and at least 6 MTM companies I know of, not to mention high-end RTW shops for both, women and men. And yet all you can see is a sea of dark grey or black suits or costumes. Along with hoodies, jeans, flip-flops, beige shorts, shirts and sandals.

 

BTW, that is still the summer colour of German men and women at retirement age: beige or light beige from head to toe, every now and again a "spritz" of colour in the form of a pale blue (polo) shirt or a skirt with a colourful, small print.

 

--There have been a few jokes going around on that topic.... horrible but so true.....as in what's the difference between two big box shoppers? Oh about 40 lbs. So much corn syrup and other easy calories doesn't help.

On the up side, I keep seeing places where people are discouraging the black tights look--like you look like you forgot something--and thinking about more tailored styles, if you'd like to look more slim. The Post Bulletin of Rochester, MN, had both of those ideas on their fashion/life page in the past week or so.

I also had a fun conversation with a young high school aged guy, who said, "Dressing up used to be an art." He had done a speech at school on various ways to tie a tie, and he was sporting a tie which I think he said was tied in a Martinelli manner.

I suppose it's good to remember people are not linear. :)          


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#42 SPOOKIETOO

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Posted 05 February 2015 - 11:48 PM

I will agree that much of the cothing of the 80's was dreadful. But I made almost all of my clothing that decade, so frankly very little was ghastly. Instead I used the trends specifically to balance out my body proportions and the added bonus was that the full shirts and shoulder pads eliminated the need to adjust for a full bust and narrow shoulders. I could really "work" a peplum skirt suit with my tiny waist. (How I miss it!) Dressed quite smartly and comfortable at the same time.

My favorite decade for womens wear was the 90's. An appropriate amount of ease was incorporated allowing for just enough drape to have a comfortable garment. Shoulder pads were greatly reduced (yeah!) But yet still existed to add some structure. The only truly bad thing were those horrid, clunky horse shoes. Young women weren't even able to learn how to walk in an appropriate heel.

A major problem now regarding fit and the current fitted trend, is that most- not all - but most, women truly need a fully structured, full body girdle to pull these styles off properly- the same way they did in the fifties. But that of course isn't going to happen, so we will continue to see young,otherwise thin beautiful girls sporting their muffin tops, and of course the truly heavy sporting much more than that. Eewwww!

If fashion would just relax a bit, clothing could be beautiful again.
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#43 cperry

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Posted 06 February 2015 - 03:27 AM

We have really wandered from the topic at hand, but I really enjoyed your post on how you created your clothing.

I also loved the clothing in the 90s. In the early 90s, I was working in an office at one of the big 3 automakers...and I loved the jackets and skirts and blouses. I was surrounded by people who understood good taste in the work place. Of course, evenings and weekends it was more casual.

Now I still like tailored clothing, even though I do not work in an office. Most of my wardrobe is capri pants or slacks and a nicer shirt when I leave the house (washable is good--sigh). I dress up more for church or other events on the weekend, even though there has been a relaxing of things there, for sure. My challenge is to create tailored things that speak femininity rather than corporate authority; and more matronly signals than youthful availability.

I love having a few tailored wool skirts that are always ready to go and look good. They don't have to be ironed or fussed with at all. That is what my husband likes to see me in.

I also think having a tailored jacket that meets the above mentioned characteristics could be great. I am coming to understand that the jacket is in the ranks of the highest level in clothes making.

I have just started reading Poulin's book!

Your point on the foundation is well taken. Agreed on the lovely lines from the 50s.
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