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The Modern Sakko, 1916

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#19 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 06 January 2015 - 07:30 AM

I have practiced my draft with ideal measuremants because you get ideal calculations.

 

Body hight  = 176cm

Chest         = 100 cm

Waist         =  90 cm

Hip             = 106 cm


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#20 Schneidergott

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Posted 06 January 2015 - 09:20 AM

This was originally done by member kuromaku, I'm just pasting it in:

 

 

The Modern Jacket

Appropriate and inappropriate templates:

There probably hasn't been any other time in which one can see as many different coat shapes in the fashion and various illustrated magazines as now. In them, figures are thrown in showing statures that don't exist, or garments presented and outlined as "modern" that are impossible for tailors to create and the clothing industry to make. Today, we'll show the error in this correlation pictorially with two figures.

Figure 1 is a strictly modern jacket from an illustrated magazine. The skirt and chest are well expressed, and are in the correct anatomical relationship to each other. The vertical pockets are easily used by the hands, as is possible with the general practice of every tailor.

In contrast to this is Figure 2, which recently appeared in a Berlin fashion magazine for tailors. This jacket, with its way too narrow hip in relation to the wide chest wouldn't work well with the help of a corset.

From these contrasting examples, we can see that the figure for the private customer is anatomically correct and tailorable, while the figure given to tailors must be regarded as untenable. We've repeatedly stressed this, but point out again that in this context, it's an offense against tailor shops as fashion. One sees so often figures where the legs are completely out of proportion to the upper body, while the latter is drawn totally unanatomically. There are poses drawn that don't exist in nature, and there are garments drawn that a tailor cannot make in a practical manner as shown. Is there any wonder then that a tailor gets in trouble with their customers because the customers want the garment made exactly as shown in the picture?

Our publisher has always chosen to put only anatomically correct principles underlying fashion figures, and show only anatomically correct garments which are also practical (to make.) As an example, Figure 3 shows a proper DB jacket that is strictly modern yet can be made by any tailor easily. This kind of modern jacket has a very broad back and lays firmly on the waist. The waist line has a pronounced kink. No bell shape or excess length. This modern jacket has smooth hips and "encloses them in baselines" (not sure exactly what is meant by this...) The rounded line is the typical character of the modern jacket.

The waist kinks some, then one finds rounded hips again. The side seams are adapted to this rounding from the waist down. The upper part's side seams are also adapted to the rounding. The transition from shoulder to sleeves is round and so requires a rounded shape for the shoulder seam. The lapel break rises up closer to the neck and is therefore very thick and round. The edge of the lapel is rounded up and runs rounded on the front edge to the waist. Even the tips of the lapels take a remarkable rounding. A barely visible curve shows from the front edge of the bottom button to the lower edge. The firm lay of the waist divides the body into two huge curves, the rounded chest and the rounded skirt. The buttonholes which are normally visible are gone. The jacket must be totally straight in the button part. The Sperrfalten (not sure what this is, something like "splayed folds" or "splayed open pleats") which have been viewed as fashionable will probably be in the future fitting errors.

For this modern jacket we show below a proportional draft from three measurements, and also a cm draft.

Proportional (fig. 4)

Back:

A-G = 2cm

A-C = 1/4 Ob = 23cm

A-E = Tl + 2cm = 45cm

A-Ec = Sl = approx. 80cm

E-c = 5cm

E-o = 3cm

Ec-Le = 3cm

Le-Ln = approx. 23cm

width of the vent hooks amounts to 3cm, evenly

A-B = 1/7 of half-Ow = 6.5cm

A-H = 1/5 Ow + 1cm = 19.5cm

H-K1 = 1/3 from H-L

K1-n = same

N is is the middle from n to L

N-Ne = 1cm

K1-K = 3cm

R-r = 1cm

b-s = 2cm

The back part should be stretched in the waist at s, moderately at the side seam at L,

Front:

Di-Y = 1/5 Ow = 18.5cm

Gi is midway from Di to Y.

Di - e = 1cm

Di - z = 1/4 Ow = 23cm

Di -FF = Tl + 2cm = 45cm

FF-S = 10cm

z-D = 1/4 Ow -2cm

FF-F = 1/4 Uw +2cm = 22.5cm

Y-V = Y-Gi -1cm = 9.25cm

F-Ut = E-Ec

Ut-Utt = 4cm

overlap Ut = 8cm, F = 5cm

V-v = 3.5cm

The dart cut from v-point4  = 4cm

Width of lapel point at point4 = 5.5cm

D to edge = 10.5cm

Gi-a = B-K1

z-w = 3cm

a-Bi = 2cm

Oe midway from Bi to w

Oe-j = 1.5cm

z-U = 4cm

S-point2 = 2cm

S-point4 = 5cm

point4 - point16 = 16cm

z-M = 1/8 Ow + 1cm = 12.5cm

Q under M perpendicularly

Q-point3 = 3cm

line from M over point3 to Lo shows the direction of the side seam

N-Ni = L-N + 1cm

Side seam runs from Ni-M with the direction line

from M it touches the M-Q line and then swings downwards towards the direction line of the side seam.

point3 - point5 = 5cm

remove 3cm from the side dart, 2cm from the breast dart

all curving of the waist stops at the F-point5 line

For reproducing the darts, you need to exactly follow the curved shapes shown in the draft.

The back width has been increased which caused a wider shoulder and the front shoulder has to be widened by 1cm at Bi.

The front needs to be shrunk in (with the iron) at around the bottom of the lapel, also at z from the the dart's side and a little at the front of scye. The shoulder and tip of the neck hole must be pulled strongly.

The same workup also for the following cm draft.


  • Der Zuschneider, Tony Rutherford, pfaff260 and 1 other like this

"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

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#21 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 06 January 2015 - 02:01 PM

Now we get some speed into my post.


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#22 Schneidergott

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Posted 08 January 2015 - 03:53 AM

 

Now we get some speed into my post.

 

 

I'm way too fast! Move, move!!!!!  :poke:

 

Schnecke_Weinberg_Wikipedia_J%C3%BCrgen-


  • Der Zuschneider, fronno, tailleuse and 2 others like this

"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

http://www.dressedwell.net/ It's snarky, but fun.





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